David Bianculli

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DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

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DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

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DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

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DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

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DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

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DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

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TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

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TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. I'm TV critic David Bianculli, sitting in for Terry Gross.

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DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

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TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR.

Hemingway, the latest PBS documentary series from Ken Burns and company, has several names attached who have become a sort of repertory group. Lynn Novick, Burns' frequent co-director, is back. So is writer Geoffrey C. Ward, who helped make Burns a PBS phenomenon with the landmark non-fiction mini-series The Civil War. And the narrator, who has lent his voice to so many past productions, is Peter Coyote.

If you've read Sarah Pinborough's 2017 novel Behind Her Eyes, you already know what to expect from Netflix's new miniseries adaptation. But if you don't know what to expect, you ought to do everything you can to keep it that way, and come to this series as uninformed as possible. Just promise yourself, in advance, that you'll stay with it, and allow its secrets to slowly reveal themselves. Get to the end — the very end — and I all but guarantee you'll be ready to start watching the whole thing all over again. Immediately.

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