Asma Khalid

Asma Khalid is a White House correspondent for NPR. She also co-hosts The NPR Politics Podcast.

Khalid is a bit of a campaign-trail addict, having reported on the 2014, 2016, 2018 and 2020 elections.

She joined NPR's Washington team in 2016 to focus on the intersection of demographics and politics.

During the 2020 presidential campaign, she covered the crowded Democratic primary field, and then went on to report on Joe Biden's candidacy.

Her reporting often dives into the political, cultural and racial divides in the country.

Before joining NPR's political team, Khalid was a reporter for Boston's NPR station WBUR, where she was nearly immediately flung into one of the most challenging stories of her career — the Boston Marathon bombings. She had joined the network just a few weeks prior, but went on to report on the bombings, the victims, and the reverberations throughout the city. She also covered Boston's failed Olympic bid and the trial of James "Whitey" Bulger.

Later, she led a new business and technology team at the station that reported on the future of work.

In addition to countless counties across America, Khalid's reporting has taken her to Pakistan, the United Kingdom and China.

She got her start in journalism in her home state of Indiana, but she fell in love with radio through an internship at the BBC Newshour in London during graduate school.

She's been a guest on numerous TV programs including ABC's This Week, CNN's Inside Politics and PBS's Washington Week.

Her reporting has been recognized with the Missouri Honor Medal for Distinguished Service in Journalism, as well as awards from the Society of Professional Journalists and the Gracie Award.

A native of Crown Point, Ind., Khalid is a graduate of Indiana University in Bloomington. She has also studied at the University of Cambridge, the London School of Economics, the American University in Beirut and Middlebury College's Arabic school.

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When President Biden looked into the cameras last week and firmly declared that "the war in Afghanistan is now over," his words were, in his view, the culmination of a central campaign promise.

In the summer of 2019, Biden delivered a speech laying out the blueprint for his foreign policy agenda. He argued that it was "past time to end the forever wars, which have cost us untold blood and treasure."

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Updated August 26, 2021 at 1:10 PM ET

In January 2002, when the U.S. Embassy in Afghanistan reopened for the first time since 1989, Ambassador Ryan Crocker said the first member of Congress to visit him in Kabul was the then-senator from Delaware, Joe Biden.

"One of his really great qualities, I thought, was his driving need to see things for himself ... and I just really respected that," Crocker said, pointing out that Biden also visited Iraq many times.

Updated August 5, 2021 at 7:08 PM ET

Major automakers and the Biden administration are mapping out a route toward a future where Americans drive a lot more electric vehicles.

President Biden, standing before a display of electric trucks and SUVs and surrounded by union officials and auto executives, signed an executive order Thursday setting a target that half of all new vehicles sold in the U.S. in 2030 be zero-emission cars, which would include plug-in hybrids.

Maureen Nicholas says she had no ideal presidential candidate in the last election.

"I voted for Biden, but I didn't want to," the former Republican said as she walked across a Walmart parking lot in Easton, Pa.

Nicholas said that she personally feels lucky, but that the overall economy feels pretty bad these days.

"Price increases — astronomical," she said. "Health care — it just seems like it's out of control."

With voting rights legislation stalled in the Senate because of Republican opposition, Vice President Harris suggested that she has talked to senators about exceptions to the legislative filibuster but said she will not be publicly negotiating an issue that the White House insists is up to lawmakers, she told NPR in an interview Tuesday.

"I believe that of all of the issues that the United States Congress can take up, the right to vote is the right that unlocks all the other rights," Harris said. "And for that reason, it should be one of its highest priorities."

Updated July 9, 2021 at 2:51 PM ET

President Biden unveiled a new plan on Friday taking aim at powerful industries where a handful of players have so much market clout that they can drive up prices, depress wages and make it hard for small companies to break in.

"We know we've got a problem, a major problem. We've also got an incredible opportunity," Biden said in remarks before signing the order.

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Good morning, and happy Fourth of July.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

PRESIDENT JOE BIDEN: Put simply, our economy is on the move, and we have COVID-19 on the run.

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In the last few weeks, the Biden administration began distributing an unprecedented amount of money to states: $195 billion dollars from the American Rescue Plan that congressional Democrats passed in March.

With the sheer scale of dollars at stake, a huge fight has already begun brewing between some GOP-led states and the administration over exactly how to use that money, part of a larger trend of partisan warfare between state capitols and Washington over the past decade.

Updated June 10, 2021 at 1:01 PM ET

In their first face-to-face meeting, President Biden and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson signed a 21st century version of the historic Atlantic Charter, an attempt to depict their countries as the chief global leaders taking on the world's biggest challenges.

The two leaders pledged to work "closely with all partners who share our democratic values" and to counter "the efforts of those who seek to undermine our alliances and institutions."

Updated June 8, 2021 at 12:01 PM ET

The White House on Tuesday announced a plan to manufacture more crucial medicines in the United States through an expanded use of the Defense Production Act, a relic of the Cold War that gives the president the authority to direct industrial production for national defense purposes.

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