Adrian Florido

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Derek Chauvin is in a jail cell this morning after being found guilty of murder and manslaughter. In reaction yesterday, George Floyd Square in Minneapolis sounded like this.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: George Floyd.

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All right, I'm going to bring in NPR's Adrian Florido, who's been covering Derek Chauvin's trial in Minneapolis. Hi, Adrian.

ADRIAN FLORIDO, BYLINE: Good morning, Noel.

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Adrian is now on the line with us from Minneapolis. Adrian, there has been so much anticipation and so much anxiety about the start of this trial. What is the mood today in Minneapolis?

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The jury chosen for the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, charged with murder in the death of George Floyd, is notable because it is significantly less white than Minneapolis itself.

Among the 12 jurors and three alternates selected for the panel are three Black men, one Black woman and two jurors who identify as multiracial. If none of the three alternates — all of them white — is needed in the deliberation room, 50% of the panel that will vote on Chauvin's fate will be Black or multiracial.

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Pedro Pierluisi was sworn in as Puerto Rico's 12th elected governor on Saturday, promising to turn the page on years of social and political turbulence in the U.S. territory and to restore trust in a government whose credibility has been badly damaged by its response to a string of recent crises.

Speaking from the steps of the island's Capitol, the new governor addressed a reduced crowd of a few hundred invited guests who wore face coverings and sat in chairs spaced out as a precaution against the coronavirus.

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Updated at 6:32 p.m. ET

For nearly four days, tension mounted in American households as an anxious nation awaited the results of the presidential election. But in an instant on Saturday, that tension washed away.

It took only seconds after Joe Biden was declared the winner over President Trump for a divided country's relief, frustration, anger and joy over the outcome to begin spilling into the streets.

Anti-Black racism had always bothered John Collins, but he'd never personally done anything about it.

That changed after police killed George Floyd in May.

Stuck at home and furloughed from work because of the pandemic, Collins had time to watch coverage of the protests Floyd's death had set off and to reflect on the nation's history of racial injustice.

When, on June 7, nine members of the Minneapolis City Council went onstage at a rally organized by Black activists and took turns reading a pledge to dismantle their city's police department, many in the crowd at Powderhorn Park let out not just cheers, but full-throated screams.

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It hadn't been easy, but before the pandemic Elia Gonzalez had always managed to keep her family fed by stretching her food stamps and her partner's modest income as a D.J. at bars around Puerto Rico's capital, San Juan. That changed in mid-March, when those bars closed and her daughter's school, where she'd gotten free breakfast and lunch, did too.

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