Kachemak City

Image Courtesy of the City of Homer

The Homer City Council allowed a Kachemak City low-income housing project to access Homer’s water system via a waterline on East End Road in March. The move spurred a conversation about how similar requests should be handled.

Homer’s council members will need to make a decision soon because the Kachemak City Council is now asking Homer to provide water services to other properties along East End Road.

Image Courtesy of the City of Homer

On Monday, the Homer City Council postponed a discussion of whether to incorporate the city’s current policy prohibiting water services from being extended outside of city limits into city code. The change would also lay out a process for exceptions to that rule.

Donna Aderhold sponsored the ordinance.

Image Courtesy of the City of Homer

The Homer City Council is maintaining its plan to provide water and sewer services to a low-income housing project in Kachemak City. The council considered rescinding the ordinance Monday after learning that Homer Mayor Ken Castner knowingly withheld a letter from Kachemak City asking the council to provide utilities to other properties. 

Kachemak City

Kachemak City changed its stance on Homer providing water services to a low-income housing project. Kachemak City’s mayor originally penned a letter urging Homer to provide water services to all properties in Kachemak City along an existing water line on East End Road.

However, during a special meeting Monday, Kachemak City Council members decided to write a letter supporting Homer’s plan.

Image Courtesy of the City of Homer

The Homer City Council approved the extension of city water and sewer services to a low-income housing project in Kachemak City last week. But now that decision may be reversed.

City Council Member Donna Aderhold wants the council to consider rescinding that action because she says it was not made aware that Kachemak City Mayor Bill Overway sent a letter to the city asking it to consider providing other Kachemak City properties with water utilities rather than just one property, input council members had requested.  

Renee Gross, KBBI News

It’s easy to complain about potholes and poorly maintained roads. But one community has been taking road repair into its own hands. Kachemak City sits on the southern Kenai Peninsula and it offers grants to residents to fix roads. Some residents say DIY roadwork beats higher taxes.

Taz Tally used a run-of-the-mill garden rake to smooth out some ruts on his neighborhood road in Kachemak City this week. As he raked, he discussed the technical term for the gravel.

“That's the D1 gravel, which is what you want for a good quality road,” he said.

Image Courtesy of the City of Homer

A low-income housing complex coming to Kachemak City will be able to hook up to Homer’s water and sewer system. The Homer City Council’s decision Monday night conflicts with a city policy prohibiting non-Homer residents from utilizing the city’s water and sewer system. Council members were divided on the issue but Mayor Ken Castner cast his tie-breaking vote in favor of the one-time deal, breaking his campaign promise to never settle a tie vote. 

Image Courtesy of the City of Homer

The Homer City Council postponed its decision Monday on whether to extend city water services to a low-income housing development outside of city limits. East End Partners offered the city $100,000 to provide city water services at the site in Kachemak City.  However, the ordinance would not allow other residents outside of city limits to access Homer city water.  

The council wants the Kachemak City Council to decide whether it will write a letter of support for the ordinance before it votes on the measure. The Kachemak council will meet Tuesday.

Kachemak City

Affordable housing is coming to Kachemak City. Swell, an Alaska-based housing developer, plans to build a 24-unit apartment complex off East End Road. It’s calling the complex East End Cottages.  

The complex near Crested Crane Street will feature two and three-bedroom units ranging from about $850 to $1,100 a month. John McGrew is one of the developers of the project.

Kachemak City

An affordable housing development may be coming to Kachemak City. Housing developer Swell wants to build a 24-unit apartment complex near Crested Crane Street off East End Road. The two developers that make up Swell are planning to construct mostly one and two-bedroom units and some three-bedrooms.

Swell says rent would be tied to income, and rent for a one-bedroom could be as low as $375 per month. Swell presented its proposal to the Kachemak City Council earlier this month.

Glenn Gellert is one of Swell’s developers: