On the Media

Monday mornings 10-11 a.m.

Since On The Media was re-launched in 2001, it has been one of NPR's fastest growing programs, heard on more than 300 public radio stations. While maintaining the civility and fairness that are the hallmarks of public radio, hosts Bob Garfield and Brooke Gladstone tackle sticky issues with a frankness and transparency that has built trust with listeners

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Podcasts

  • Friday, January 22, 2021 8:00am

    On this week’s show, we take a deep breath. Plus, journalists reflect on the deep damage done to our information ecosystem and how we can begin to repair it. And, Brooke and Bob take a journey through 20 years of OTM.

    1. Brooke and Bob on the (short-lived) reprieve following the 45th president's departure, and McKay Coppins [@mckaycoppins], staff writer at The Atlantic, on how the environment for "elite" journalists has changed in the past four years. Listen.

    2. Yamiche Alcindor [@Yamiche], White House correspondent for the PBS NewsHour, Jay Rosen [@jayrosen_nyu], media critic and journalism professor at New York University, and Karen Attiah [@KarenAttiah], global opinions editor at the Washington Post, on what they've learned as journalists from the Trump era, and what comes next. Listen.

    3. Bob and Brooke reflect on more than a thousand shows together, and twenty years of On the Media. Listen.

    Music from the show:
    Misterioso — Kronos Quartet 
    Passing Time — John Renbourn 
    Newsreel — Randy Newman
    A Ride with Polly Jean — Jenny Scheinman
    You're Getting to be a Habit with Me — Bing Crosby & Guy Lombardo and His Royal Canadians

     

  • Wednesday, January 20, 2021 8:00am

    This story was co-published with ProPublica.

    A birth certificate, a bar receipt, a newspaper ad, a board game, a Ziploc bag of shredded paper, a pair of museum tickets, some checks, and a USB drive. The series finale of Trump, Inc.

    This episode was reported by Andrea Bernstein, Meg Cramer, Anjali Kamat, Ilya Marritz, Katherine Sullivan, Eric Umansky, and Heather Vogell. We assembled our time capsule at Donald J. Trump State Park; it will be stored until 2031 with WNYC's archives department.


    This is the last episode of Trump, Inc. But it's not the end of our reporting: subscribe to our newsletter for updates on what we're doing next. Show your support with a donation to New York Public Radio.

  • Friday, January 15, 2021 8:00am

    Evidence shows that insurrectionists used the walkie-talkie app Zello to help organize the riot at the capitol. On this week’s On the Media, a look at how the platform has resisted oversight, despite warnings that it was enabling right-wing extremism. Plus, how to sniff out the real corporate boycotts from the PR facades. And, how to build social media that doesn't exploit users for profit. 

    1. OTM reporter Micah Loewinger [@MicahLoewinger] on Zello's role in last week's insurrection, and what the app is finally doing about its militia members. Listen.

    2. Casey Newton [@CaseyNewton], writer for Platformeron why this wave of social media scrubbing might not be such a bad thing. Listen.

    3. Siva Vaidhyanathan [@sivavaid], professor of media studies at the University of Virginia, and Americus Reed II [@amreed2], professor of marketing at the Wharton School of Business, on the true costs of corporate boycotts. Listen.

    4. Eli Pariser [@elipariser], co-director of Civic Signals, on how to build digital spaces that do not monetize our social activity or spy on us for profit. Listen.

    Music from the show:
    Fallen Leaves — Marcos Ciscar
    The Hammer of Loss — John Zorn — A Vision in Blakelight
    Hard Times — Nashville Sessions — Songs of the Civil War
    What’s that Sound? — Michael Andrews
    In the Bath — Randy Newman
    Boy Moves the Sun — Michael Andrews
    Ain’t Misbehavin’ — Hank Jones

  • Tuesday, January 12, 2021 8:00am

    Over the past 10 months, debates have raged over how to keep the coronavirus in check. What to open? What to close? Where does the virus spread, and where are we relatively safe? Through it all, one kind of space in particular has been the subject of vigorous debate — and, starting a few months into the virus, a kind of unexpected conventional wisdom emerged: that schools were relatively safe. In the midst of the darkness, it brought some welcome light: kids are safe! They can go to school! While other institutions closed, countries around the world — particularly in Europe and the UK — kept their schools open.

    And yet, in response to rising rates and a new, more contagious variant, many of those same countries have since closed their school doors. It turns out that, if you believe the epidemiologists, schools do, in fact, bring risk of transmission. How could we ever have thought otherwise? Rachel Cohen has been covering the debates around school closings and openings, most recently at The Intercept. In this week's podcast extra, she tells Brooke about how the school transmission narrative has evolved since the beginning of the pandemic, and how our understanding of the issue came to be so muddled.

  • Friday, January 8, 2021 8:00am

    On this week’s On The Media, journalists struggle to find the words to describe what happened at the capitol on Wednesday. Was it a riot? A mob? An insurrection? Plus, why supporters of the president’s baseless election fraud theories keep invoking the “lost cause” myth of the confederacy. And, taking a second look at "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down."

    1. Brooke [@OTMBrooke] and Bob [@bobosphere] on the events at the Capitol on Wednesday. Listen.

    2. Caroline Janney [@CarrieJanney], historian of the Civil War at University of Virginia, on the evolution of the post-Civil War Lost Cause mythology. Listen.

    3. Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw [@sandylocks], professor of law at UCLA and Columbia Law School, on how post-Civil War appeasement allowed for the perpetuation of white supremacy in the United States. Listen.

    4. Jack Hamilton [@jack_hamilton], associate professor of American studies and media studies at the University of Virginia, on the mixed and missed messages in the rock anthem "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" by The Band. Listen.

    Music from this week's show:
    Invitation to a Suicide — John Zorn
    Sneaky Adventure — Kevin MacLeod

    Glass House/Curtains — David Bergeaud
    The Last Bird — Zoe Keating
    Lost, Night — Bill Frisell
    Using the Apostate Tyrant as His Tool — Kronos Quartet
    The Night They Drove Ol' Dixie Down — The Band
    The Night They Drove Ol' Dixie Down — Richie Havens

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Now it's time for Faith Matters. That's another part of the program that listeners have told us they very much appreciate. That's where we talk about matters of faith, religion and spirituality.