salmon

This Week in Landings - 08/02

Aug 2, 2019
Salmon
University of Washington

Sockeye salmon continued pouring into Upper Cook Inlet.  Six hundred forty thousand found their way into the nets of the commercial gillnet fleet, up from three hundred ninety thousand the week before.  The Alaska Department of Fish and Game announced that the Kenai and Kasilof rivers have exceeded escapement goals, and they have extended fishing periods for set gillnetters and opened expanded areas in the Kasilof, Kenai, and Anchor Point subdistricts  to drifters.

Juniper - Episode 21

Jul 28, 2019
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Common_juniper_berries_(Mica_B).JPG

Check the Pantry goes evergreen this week.  The Grog Shop's Patrick Driscoll leads a collection of gin lovers and haters featuring Grady Avant, Mel Strydom, and Pat Ahern through several different gins and gin cocktails, and host Jeff Lockwood makes a juniper-enhanced sauce soubise and a salmon and juniper sausage. 

Gin provided by the Grog Shop.  Produced by KBBI AM 890 in Homer, Alaska.

This Week in Bycatch - July 17

Jul 17, 2019
Halibut
Nancy Heise / Wikimedia

Bycatch of prohibited species in the Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea/Aleutian Islands regulatory areas continued to be relatively low this week across all fisheries, according to the update by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) covering the week of July 6.  Only fifty kings and two thousand non-king salmon were caught incidentally. The bycatch of crab has also been low, only five thousand total animals.

Salmon
University of Washington

Halibut landings across the state have slowed down as boats turn their attention to salmon.  Homer landed 109,763 pounds of halibut on fifteen deliveries in the last week, over twice as much as Kodiak.  Seward recorded 37,573 pounds. Almost eight and a half million pounds have been caught so far around the state in the IFQ longline fishery.  

This Week in Landings - June 28

Jun 28, 2019
Salmon
University of Washington

The first two openers of the 2019 Upper Cook Inlet drift gillnet season are done.  The June 20 and 24 Central District fishing periods each yielded about two thousand salmon for a total harvest of four thousand one hundred thirteen (4013) fish on one hundred forty six (146) deliveries.  Ninety two percent were sockeye. Setnetters on the west side of the Central District caught just under twenty-five hundred fish, of which all but fifteen were sockeye.

This Week in Landings

Jun 20, 2019
Salmon
University of Washington

The Southern District of Lower Cook Inlet, which includes Kachemak Bay, opened to seiners this Monday, June 17, with sixteen-hour openers scheduled for Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays.  The Alaska Department of Fish and Game reported Monday’s salmon harvest as four Chinook and 110 sockeye on four deliveries, all from the China Poot section. Sections with fewer than three deliveries are not included in public reports.

 

Copper River sockeye fishery off to a good start

May 22, 2019
Photo by Daysha Eaton/KBBI

Alaska’s first commercial salmon fishery is off to a good start on the Cooper River in Prince William Sound. After two fishing periods, Alaska Department of Fish and Game Area Management Biologist Jeremy Botz said fishermen have caught nearly 74,000 sockeye and about 4,000 chinook.

Alaska Department of Fish and Game

As a number of commercial salmon fisheries around the state kick off this week, the outlook for ex-vessel prices is looking good. Fishing economists say between lower run forecasts and strong foreign and domestic demand, commercial fishermen will likely see higher prices this year. But that doesn’t necessarily mean commercial fishermen will earn more this season compared to last year.   

Andy Wink with Wink Research and Consulting said although prices vary by species and region, most fisheries should see stable or higher prices this year.

KBBI News

The Copper River commercial sockeye fishery is likely to fall below forecast for the second year in a row. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game closed one of the fishery’s 12-hour openings last week due to low escapement and abysmal harvest levels.

That trend continued this week with a slow fishing period on Monday, and the department announced Wednesday that it’s closing the fishery on Thursday for the second week in a row.

Copper River sockeye run off to a really slow start

May 23, 2018
KBBI News

The sockeye run on the Copper River is off to an incredibly slow start. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game opened the fishery on May 17 for a 12-hour fishing period.

Gillnetters came home with roughly 1,900 sockeye and returned on Monday for another opening, but fishing still remained slow with only 3,400 fish winding up in nets.

Fish and Game biologist Jeremy Botz said those numbers are well under what the department expected.

Courtesy of the Alaska Humanities Forum

The Alaska Humanities Forum announced 16 new additions to its Alaska Salmon Fellows program last week. Two Homer residents were selected for the second round of the program. Homer City Council member and Gulf Watch Alaska Science Coordinator Donna Aderhold was among those selected throughout the state. Homer commercial fisherman Catie Bursch and Kenai Peninsula Borough Land Manager Marcus Mueller were also on the list.

Alaska Department of Fish and Game

The North Pacific Fishery Management Council formed a committee Thursday to explore management options for salmon in the federal waters of Cook Inlet. The court-ordered move comes after the council lost a lawsuit in 2016 against an industry group. The lawsuit first began in 2013 after the council gave control of federal salmon fisheries in Cook Inlet to the state. Here’s NPFMC council member Glenn Merrill.

Alaska Department of Fish and Game

Earnings from commercial fisheries on the Kenai Peninsula have been going down in recent years according to the 2018 Kenai Peninsula Borough Comprehensive Draft Plan.

The plan, released in December, states that fishery earnings declined from 2013 to 2016 and cites research from the Commercial Fisheries Entry Commission. Total revenue from fisheries on the peninsula during that time decreased from roughly 150 to 90 million dollars. Craig Farrington is a researcher at the commission and said smaller earnings are likely due to less salmon.

KBBI News

Every good fish story seems to be based in the past, and as most fishermen will tell you, the fish were bigger way back when. But in the case of chinook, or king salmon, that actually seems to be the case. At the turn of the twentieth century, you can find photographs of fishermen holding up massive king salmon, now, not so much. But a recent study published in Wiley Online Library may have an idea as to why kings up and down the West Coast are shrinking.

Alaska Department of Fish and Game

Salmon runs in Prince William Sound are predicted to be average or below average in 2018.

 

For seiners, wild pinks are expected to come in about 20 percent under the 10-year average for even years, but Alaska Department of Fish and Game Area Management Biologist Charlie Russell said hatchery fish are expected to pick up some of the slack.

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