City of Homer

City of Homer

Part I:
Jenny Carroll, Information Officer for the City of Homer, Nurse Lorne Carroll from the Homer Public Health Clinic, and Derotha Ferraro of South Peninsula Hospital discuss the latest from the Homer Unified Command and answer listener questions.

Part II:
Rachel Tussey from the City of Homer and Harbormaster Bryan Hawkins address issues, policies and practices specific to the Homer Harbor.

The live, on-air panel for the COVID Brief convenes every Thursday at 9 a.m. If you have questions for the panel, email them to kathleen@kbbi.org.
 

KBBI

Jenny Carroll, Information Officer for the City of Homer, Nurse Lorne Carroll from the Homer Public Health Clinic, Derotha Ferraro of South Peninsula Hospital, and Homer Fire and EMS Chief Mark Kirko discuss the latest from the Homer Unified Command and answer listener questions every Thursday at 9 a.m. If you have questions for the panel, email them to kathleen@kbbi.org.

Transcripts

Part I

PBS

At Monday night's Homer City Council meeting, the Emergency Operations Center's weekly report opened with state public health nurse, Lorne Carroll addressing the question of how COVID-19 deaths are identified and classified.

“ Per national guidance, COVID-19 should be reported on a death certificate for those who have passed, where the disease is assumed to have had a cause, or contributed to a death. So, that's according to the attending physicians’ best judgement,” said Nurse Carroll.

City of Homer

When the State of Alaska started issuing health mandates, people started buying cleaning supplies they don't ordinarily buy, like sanitary wipes and cloths.

People who already used them, like parents and caregivers, combined with people who are using them now to help keep the virus out of the house, are having an effect on sanitation and wastewater systems.

Todd Cook is Wastewater Superintendent for the City of Homer. Cook says when schools and workplaces first closed, the City's systems were tested.

Two new COVID-19 cases in Homer - one hospitalized

Apr 30, 2020
PBS

The number of COVID-19 cases associated with Homer doubled yesterday, with the announcement by the city that two new individuals have tested positive for the disease. 

    According to the announcement on the city’s Covid-19 web page, one patient is currently hospitalized, while the other is confined to home. Both were tested earlier this week at South Peninsula Hospital. The city has no information indicating that the cases are related.

Treatment Plant Operator Magazine

Knowing how many people in Homer have COVID-19 is crucial to safely opening up business on the peninsula. With narrow parameters for who can be tested and an initial scramble for test kits and protective equipment, local health care providers have only been able to determine so much.  KBBI's Kathleen Gustafson has the story on the city of Homer's efforts to detect COVID-19 in wastewater.

CDC

As of Monday, April 20 at 5 p.m. South Peninsula Hospital has submitted 178 COVID-19 tests, 158 returned negative, 19 are still pending. Since testing began, one test has come back positive. That was three  weeks ago. That person has since been determined  to have recovered.

KBBI’s Kathleen Gustafson met, virtually, with Jenny Carroll from the City of Homer, Public Health Nurse, Lorne Carroll and Derotha Ferraro of South Peninsula Hospital for a COVID-19 Update. Ferraro begins by explaining why more people are now eligible for tests.

In this age of Covid-19, even decisions made by the Homer Foundation are taking the pandemic into consideration. The organization last week announced the grants awarded through the City of Homer’s Grant Program to the 13 local nonprofits that applied this year, totaling $39,500.
    While the amount is about $4,000 less than the 20-year average, it is in line with recent years’ grants, according to Homer Foundation Executive Director Mike Miller.

CDC

Local city, state and hospital officials called-in to KBBI on Monday night for a COVID-19 update.
Derotha Ferraro from South Peninsula Hospital says The Homer Medical Clinic on Bartlett Street is now serving as the hospital’s urgent care center and staying open until 8 p.m.
And, as of this week, more people will be eligible for a test and SPH will be adding an additional location for testing.

Derotha Ferraro from South Peninsula Hospital, Nurse Lorne Carroll from the AK Department of Public Health, Chief Mark Kirko of Homer Volunteer Fire Department and Jenny Carroll from the City of Homer join KBBI's Kathleen Gustafson for the Thursday COVID-19 Brief.

If you do not have a health care provider and are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19, call the Homer Public Health offices at (907) 235-8857.

The City of Homer has added a section to its website devoted specifically to the Covid-19/coronavirus. City Information Officer Jenny Carroll detailed some of the site’s easy-to-use features in a conversation with KBBI.

We've put a lot of work into this website so that it can be as comprehensive a source of information for people as can be.

Mike Ilg, Director of Homer Community Schools, is the city's new coordinator for local relief and response to COVID-19. He talks about access to services and checks-in with Homer Church on the Rock, The Homer Foundation, Homer Chamber of Commerce, and Green Dot Homer, The Homer Community Food Pantry and The Salvation Army.

For a master list of phone numbers of resources for food, food deliveries, rental and utility assistance, go to https://www.cityofhomer-ak.gov/covid19

South Peninsula Hospital

Updates and information from:
Nurse Lorne Carroll from AK Department of Public Health, Chief Mark Kirko from Homer Volunteer Fire Department, Derotha Ferraro from South Peninsula Hospital, Pegge Erkeneff from Kenai Peninsula Borough School District and Jenny Carroll from the City Of Homer.
You can access updated information anytime at the City of Homer website.  http://cityofhomer-ak.gov/

City of Homer

When it comes to coronavirus, we need to flatten the curve.  We want to avoid huge spikes in infections in a short period of time. Let’s not overwhelm our healthcare system.  Flattening the curve means taking actions now that keep the virus from spreading quickly.  Don’t shake hands.  Make sure to cover your sneezes and coughs.  Wash your hands more frequently.  Call your health provider first before going in.  Telemedicine options are also highly encouraged.  Learn more at coronavirus.alaska.gov
 

City of Homer

To prevent the spread of coronavirus, it is important that all Alaskans take social distancing seriously. It is also really important that you stay home if you are sick, even with a mild respiratory illness. We recommend preparing your home to self-quarantine for two weeks. That means having enough food and essential supplies on hand for fourteen days, not for four months. Learn more about how to prepare and prevent the spread of COVID-19 at coronavirus.alaska.gov.

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