Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Thursdays 9:00-10:00 a.m.

The Peabody Award-winning "Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen," from PRI and WNYC, is public radio’s smart and surprising guide to what's happening in pop culture and the arts. Each week, Kurt Andersen introduces you to the people who are creating and shaping our culture.

Ways to Connect

Podcasts

  • Thursday, May 2, 2019 12:00pm
    Kurt Andersen talks with novelist Karl Ove Knausgård about his nonfiction book about Norwegian painter Edvard Munch. Ani DiFranco’s new memoir chronicles the ups and downs of being a feminist folk hero. Pete Seeger would have been 100 this week, and Kurt revisits a lovely afternoon he spent with the singer in the home he built himself along the river. And a site-specific art project, “Romantic Songs of the Patriarchy,” exposes misogyny in popular music in a grueling yet entertaining way.

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  • Tuesday, April 30, 2019 2:00am
    Ali Smith’s 2016 book Autumn was heralded as the first great post-Brexit novel. Kurt talks with her about politics, art, and the very nature of time.

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  • Thursday, April 25, 2019 12:00pm
    Kurt Andersen talks with Susan Choi, whose engrossing new novel about on- and offstage drama at a performance arts high school is called “Trust Exercise.” How Edward Doyle-Gillespie ended up writing poetry about being a Baltimore cop. And This Woman’s Work, our new series in collaboration with Classic Album Sundays that highlights classic albums by female artists, kicks off with Patti Smith’s groundbreaking first album, “Horses.” 

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  • Thursday, April 18, 2019 12:00pm
    Kurt Andersen talks with playwright Suzan-Lori Parks about “White Noise,” along with one of the play’s stars, Daveed Diggs from the original cast of “Hamilton.” Iggy Berlin explains what he does as an extra for operas and ballets, where they’re called supernumeraries. And the rich history of the song “In the Pines,” which many luminaries sang in their signature style, from Kurt Cobain to Lead Belly to Bill Monroe.

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  • Tuesday, April 16, 2019 2:00am
    This month marks the birth centennial of American dancer and choreographer Merce Cunningham. His defiant work transformed contemporary arts beyond dance. Cunningham talks about movement and technology, and dancers Daniel Roberts and Bill T. Jones tell us about his influence.

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The equipment manufacturer Caterpillar reported record profits per share in the second quarter, but the company also said it will have to raise prices because of new tariffs.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson discusses the latest with CBS News business analyst Jill Schlesinger (@jillonmoney), host of “Jill on Money” and the podcast “Better Off.”

Parents whose children who are addicted to drugs are routinely advised to be tough with their kids — even cut them off, if necessary. But a new video produced by the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids promotes compassion and understanding instead of punishment.

WBUR’s Martha Bebinger (@mbebinger) reports.

The Substation fire in northern Oregon burned more than 78,000 acres, most of it prime farmland for wheat. As Molly Solomon (@solomonout) of Oregon Public Broadcasting reports, it’s often farmers who are on the front lines fighting the blaze.

A group called Restore Hetch Hetchy met with Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke Sunday to discuss draining the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir, located in Yosemite National Park. The reservoir supplies water to San Francisco.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd speaks with Spreck Rosekrans, executive director of Restore Hetch Hetchy.

The hot weather many Americans are experiencing is actually happening across four continents.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson and Peter O’Dowd talk with The Weather Channel meteorologist Mark Elliot (@twcMarkElliot) about the extreme heat, as well as torrential rains along the Eastern Seaboard on Monday.

President Trump tweeted Sunday that Iranian aggression would be met with “consequences the likes of which few throughout history have ever suffered before.” He also continued to question allegations of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, writing, “it is all a big hoax.”

NPR’s Sarah McCammon (@sarahmccammon) talks with Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd from the White House.

A new study out this week has found that around a third of trials that look at antibiotics don’t report safety results, and almost a third didn’t report adverse affects of using probiotics.

Lynn Visson is a teacher and writer, and was an interpreter at the United Nations for 22 years, interpreting French and Russian into English for politicians like former President Jimmy Carter.

Speed is key when doing high-stakes interpreting with delegates and other notable figures, Visson tells Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson.

In Illinois, prisoners with disabilities may end up staying behind bars, long after their release date has passed. Most inmates are put on mandatory supervised release, which requires a person to have stable housing before they can leave prison. An analysis by WBEZ in Chicago found many facilities on the department’s housing directory could not take people who use a wheelchair.

Wimbledon is the world’s oldest tennis tournament, and it occupies a special place in the hearts of many players. Former champion Boris Becker once called it the most important tournament there is. It’s also a summer tradition across Britain, even for those who aren’t lucky enough to nab tickets.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with The Independent’s tennis corespondent Paul Newman about what makes Wimbledon unique, and the role of tradition at the tournament.

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