Jim Zarroli

Jim Zarroli is an NPR correspondent based in New York. He covers economics and business news.

Over the years, he has reported on recessions and booms, crashes and rallies, and a long string of tax dodgers, insider traders, and Ponzi schemers. Most recently, he has focused on trade and the job market. He also worked as part of a team covering President Trump's business interests.

Before moving into his current role, Zarroli served as a New York-based general assignment reporter for NPR News. While in this position, he reported from the United Nations and was also involved in NPR's coverage of Hurricane Katrina, the London transit bombings, and the Fukushima earthquake.

Before joining NPR in 1996, Zarroli worked for the Pittsburgh Press and wrote for various print publications.

He lives in Manhattan, loves to read, and is a devoted (but not at all fast) runner.

Zarroli grew up in Wilmington, Delaware, in a family of six kids and graduated from Pennsylvania State University.

Double-amputee sprinter Oscar Pistorius will be released on parole on Tuesday, one year after his conviction for killing his girlfriend by shooting her through a bathroom door, South African officials say.

He will be held temporarily under house arrest, and his parole will continue through 2019.

Taking on Wall Street makes for good politics in the Democratic Party. And several of the candidates at Tuesday night's debate had tough words about big banks. That was particularly true of former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders.

Although he didn't say so directly, O'Malley suggested several times that consolidation in the banking business was a big factor in the 2008 financial crash and that the U.S. economy remains vulnerable because of it.

The Minnesota dentist who killed Cecil the black-maned lion in Zimbabwe last summer, generating international outrage, won't face charges and can return to the country, government officials said.

Zimbabwe officials announced last summer that they would try to extradite Walter Palmer, the big-game hunter who killed Cecil in a bow-hunt, after allegedly paying $50,000 for the "privilege." But after reviewing the case, they decided Palmer hadn't broken any hunting laws.

After just a week back on the job, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey is making his presence felt in a big way, announcing plans to cut up to 8 percent of the workforce at the money-losing messaging company.

The cuts, some 336 of them, were approved by Twitter's board on Monday, as part of what the company calls "an overall plan to organize around the company's top product priorities and drive efficiencies."

In corporate speak, that means: "We need to get our act together before too many more investors lose patience with us."

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