Adrian Florido

Adrian Florido is a reporter for NPR's Code Switch team, where he's covered race, identity and culture since 2015.

He's based in Los Angeles but reports nationally, looking for small or nuanced human stories that tell us something larger.

In 2018 he was based in San Juan, Puerto Rico, reporting on the aftermath of Hurricane Maria while on special assignment for NPR's National Desk.

Before joining NPR, he was a reporter at NPR Member station KPCC in Los Angeles, covering public health. Before that, he was the U.S.-Mexico border reporter at KPBS in San Diego. He began his career as a staff writer at the Voice of San Diego.

Florido is a Southern California native. He graduated from the University of Chicago with a degree in history, with an emphasis on U.S.-Latin America relations. He was news editor of the student paper, the Chicago Maroon. He's also an organizer of the Fandango Fronterizo, an annual event during which musicians gather on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border and play together through the fence that separates the two countries.

Florida Congressman Mario Diaz-Balart delivered the Spanish-language response to the State of the Union address, with a different message on immigration than the one in South Carolina Gov.

After a turbulent week spurred by racial tensions at the University of Missouri, students are reflecting and thinking about what changes they hope for next on campus.

After anonymous threats targeting black students at the University of Missouri were posted online Tuesday evening, saying things like, "I'm going to shoot any black people tomorrow, so be ready," the fear on campus grew quickly.

Some black students were so scared that they left their dorms to stay with friends off campus. Others didn't go that far, but did stay inside and away from windows.

Presidential candidate Donald Trump's proposal to deport all 11 million immigrants living in the country illegally, along with their U.S.-born children, sounds far-fetched. But something similar happened before.

During the 1930s and into the 1940s, up to 2 million Mexicans and Mexican-Americans were deported or expelled from cities and towns across the U.S. and shipped to Mexico. According to some estimates, more than half of these people were U.S. citizens, born in the United States.

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