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Covid Numbers on the Rise

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PBS
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PBS

On the regular Thursday Covid Brief with host Josh Krohn, guests were South Peninsula Hospital’s Derotha Ferraro and Public Health Nurse Lorne Caroll.

South Peninsula Hospital’s Derotha Ferraro gave an update on current numbers. There have been 4 new ER visits in the past week, which is down from the previous week. However, there have been no new hospitalizations relating to Covid.

“We did 441 tests, and of those 52 were positive. So that's a 12% positivity rate, about the same as last week 11%. But that does mean 52 people tested positive for COVID. We did three of them, outpatient imu… monoclonal infusions. And we did eighty-two vaccines,” Ferraro said.

Alaska Public Health Nurse Lorne Caroll brought up Alaska’s hospital capacity. He said, not including Homer (which has remained relatively unburdened) hospitals around the state are filling up.

“In regards to all ICU beds, and non ICU beds across the state, about three quarters of the beds are filled with clients. And out of all of those, about three and a half percent of them have COVID. And right now, there's only one person in the state reportedly on a ventilator who is challenged with COVID 19,” Caroll said.

Ferraro mentioned that the reason the state's hospital capacity is reduced currently, is not because hospitals are filled with Covid patients. However it is tied to Covid, specifically, staffing.

“Summertime is traditionally quite busy with the hospitals and Alaska, having nothing to do with COVID. And Lauren shared those numbers that very, very small percentage of those beds were filled with COVID patients. So Summertime is a busy time for health care in Alaska. Number two, closed simply means number of amount of resources available to take care of a new admission. So it doesn't don't picture that all of the beds are full necessarily. Um, it just might be a staffing shortage and the staffing shortages right now are rolling because of the nature of COVID,” Ferraro said.

Caroll said that if you are over 50, it is recommended that you get the second booster. It just needs to be at least four months after receiving your first booster. There are other demographics that are eligible also.

“Kiddos and adults that are 12 years of age and older, who are moderately or severely immuno compromised Should, should really go ahead and get that second booster,” Caroll said.

To hear the full Covid Brief or any past Briefs, go to kbbi.org or find the podcast on your favorite app.

Simon Lopez is a long time listener of KBBI Homer. He values Kachemak Bay’s beauty and its overall health. Simon is community oriented and enjoys being involved in building and maintaining an informed and proactive community.