Recent News Stories

Kachemak Bay - Photo by Shady Grove Oliver/KBBI

According to a recent NOAA study, Alaskan shellfish hatcheries risk becoming unsustainable by 2040 because of ocean acidification. Over the last week, we’ve heard how a hatchery in Oregon is dealing with changes in ocean chemistry and about groundbreaking genetic research on shellfish adaptability. But the big questions still remain- how far reaching will the effects be and can we mitigate them before it’s too late? KBBI’s Shady Grove Oliver has more.

Diagram of upwelling - Photo courtesy of http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/upwelling.html

A recent NOAA study found that by 2040, Alaskan shellfish hatcheries may no longer be sustainable because of ocean acidification, unless serious mitigation efforts are put in place. Last week, we reported on a hatchery in Oregon that’s become a model for adapting to these different conditions. But the long term solution may actually lie in shellfish genes. KBBI’s Shady Grove Oliver has more.

Inside the Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery - Photo courtesy of ceoas.oregonstate.edu

A recent NOAA study named 2040 as the date for the potential end of Alaskan shellfish hatcheries. That is, unless serious mitigation efforts are put in place to combat ocean acidification. Earlier this week, we reported on the research, done at the Alutiiq Pride Shellfish Hatchery in Seward. Now, we’ll take a look at what a hatchery on the Oregon coast is doing to deal with these harmful changes in ocean chemistry. KBBI’s Shady Grove Oliver has more.

Image Courtesy of the Kenai Peninsula Borough

The Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly will not repeal restrictions meant to protect salmon habitat from human interference. KBBI’s Quinton Chandler reports the assembly voted five to four Tuesday night against an ordinance that would have lifted the Anadromous Waters Protection District from all streams except the Kenai and Kasilof River Watersheds.

Alutiiq Pride Shellfish Hatchery in Seward - Photo courtesy of Wiley Evans/NOAA

New research paints an unsettling picture of the future of shellfish in coastal Alaska. The effects of ocean acidification are worsening and could mean the end of hatcheries in the next 25 years if costly mitigation efforts aren’t put in place. KBBI’s Shady Grove Oliver has more.

Homer City Hall - Photo by KBBI

The state’s dramatic loss in oil revenue means budget cuts to local municipalities across Alaska. And the City of Homer is no different. This fiscal year Homer’s jail will lose nearly half its state funding and the city is also bracing for a loss in state funds that typically help balance its operating budget. KBBI’s Quinton Chandler reports the cuts come at a time when the city’s budget is already stretched thin.

I bet she knows the answers! - Photo by Shady Grove Oliver/KBBI

Fireworks, parades, and American flags- that’s what most people think of when Fourth of July rolls around. But how much does the average Alaskan actually know about Independence Day? KBBI decided to find out. We hit the Homer parade route with a little holiday quiz. KBBI’s Shady Grove Oliver has more.

The 19th annual Land’s End Regatta ended the way a sailboat race shouldn’t- it was called on the second day for lack of wind. For two days, boats and crews tried to make the best of the extremely calm weather. And as KBBI’s Shady Grove Oliver reports, there’s more to sailing than just following the breeze.

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