Marketplace - American Public Media

New brands take a chance with Super Bowl ads

Fri, 2015-01-30 02:00

More than a dozen brands will run Super Bowl ads for the first time this Sunday. Look for brands like Skittles, Weight Watchers, and Always, maker of feminine hygiene products, to make their game-day debut. That’s the most newcomers in about 15 years.

NBC finally sold out of Super Bowl ads four days before the game. In 2014, Fox sold out two months before kickoff.

“Due to some of the controversy over the past year with the NFL, there were probably some brands that have traditionally been Super Bowl advertisers that decided maybe this was a good year to not get involved,” says David Griner, digital managing editor at Adweek.com.

Watch the Always commercial here:

Silicon Tally: Earthquakes, Made in the U.S.A.

Fri, 2015-01-30 02:00

It's time for Silicon Tally! How well have you kept up with the week in tech news.

This week, we're joined by Kyle Wagner, a sports stats fan and a writer at Deadspin.

The online version of this week's Silicon Tally quiz is forthcoming.

Cheap gas could cut into transit ridership

Fri, 2015-01-30 02:00

With gas prices as low as $2 in some parts of the country, mass transit providers are starting to worry that their ridership numbers will also dip.  

Use of public transit in the U.S. is at levels not seen since the 1950’s — That’s according to the American Public Transportation Association.

High gas prices are a part of that growth, and now that costs are falling some cities fear a drop-off in ridership.

So far that has not been the case in Chicago, at least.

"In the two months that fuel prices have been well below $3 we have not seen any significant shifts on either the rail side or the bus side," says Brian Steele, a spokesman for the Chicago Transit Authority.

Steele points out that gas is just one cost associated with driving a car, in addition to parking costs, insurance costs, maintenance costs. 

But others question whether public transit use has really gone up as a percentage of population growth.

"Think of it in terms of inflation: has mass transit ridership, in terms of a percentage increased each year, kept up with inflation? No, it hasn't come close to it," says Ray Mundy, Director of the Center for Transportation Studies at the University of Missouri—St. Louis.  Despite increases in ridership, Mundy says transit still only accounts 5 percent of trips in metro areas.

Super Bowl Sunday's MVC: Most Valuable Commercial

Fri, 2015-01-30 01:30
2.6 percent

Gross Domestic Product expanded at a rate of 2.6 percent in the fourth quarter, as reported by the WSJ. That puts GDP growth for 2014 at 2.4 percent, a below average rate compared to previous growth periods.

9 percent

That's how far Alibaba's stock tanked Tuesday following a solid, if slightly underwhelming, quarterly earnings report. The fall has much more to do with a government report leaked Tuesday accusing Alibaba of being lax on illegal practices from vendors. Quartz has the full story.

15 years

More than a dozen brands will air their first Super Bowl ads this Sunday, the highest number of newcomers in almost 15 years. Look for brands like Skittles, Weight Watchers, and Always, maker of feminine hygiene products, to make their game-day debut. 

70

Speaking of Super Bowl commercials, 70 is how many ad slots NBC had to sell for this year's game. The ads — which cost about $4.5 million for a 30-second spot — finally sold out this week, AdAge reported. Post-game and digital slots are all filled too, but there's still a little time to buy to a pre-game spot if you have the cash to spare. Here's a roundup of the all the ads confirmed so far.

$37,500

That's what an ad in the first Super Bowl cost in 1967, $266,000 adjusted for inflation. Slate has a retrospective of the most iconic ads over the game's last 48 years.

4,500

The number of users currently on This., a new social network that is, based on its coverage in the New York Times, the new Ello. The invite-only site promises a pared-down social media experience wherein users may only share one link a day and nothing more.

4 purchases

That's how many purchases are needed to ID you, despite anonymous credit card data. As reported by Reuters, scientists at MIT worked with metadata (data that only identifies time and place of purchases), and then looked at public information like non-anonymous purchases and social media to try and match people with their credit card activity. In some cases, it took as little as two purchases by a person to positively ID them.

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