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Updated: 28 min 16 sec ago

Even if it's not "123456", change your password

Wed, 2015-03-18 01:30
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The age Rep. Aaron Schock was elected to the Peoria school board, shortly after graduating. He would become board president at 22 and eventually represent Peoria's district as one of the youngest lawmakers on Capitol Hilly. Schock resigned Tuesday amid a spending probe, and the Washington Post has traced the congressman's rapid rise and the never-too-big attitude that may have been his undoing.

9 minutes

The gap between when students were alerted to a shooting at Florida State University via Yik Yak and when the school's emergency notification came through. The app, popular on college campuses, is part of a theme the Marketplace Tech team has seen running through SXSW Interactive this year: Users want more than just data privacy, they value anonymity too.

123456

Speaking of privacy, that's the most common password among 15 million put online by a security analyst and Russian hackers, Quartz reported. That seems obvious, but interestingly that pattern of keystrokes is also the most common, accounting for passwords like "qwerty," "asdfgh" and any other combination of six adjacent keys to the right. Here are the other most common combinations:

Courtesy:WP Engine via Quartz 20-24 years

The age group researchers at Syracuse University found a sizeable gap in employment between veterans and non-vets. There's plenty of anecdotal evidence showing veterans from the post-9/11 era have more trouble finding employment, Marketplace's Dan Weissmann learned hard numbers are difficult to come by.

Snapchat worth as much as Campbell's Soup?

Tue, 2015-03-17 14:03

Pinterest is the latest company to get a multi-billion dollar valuation. But how do investors and the startup founders decide what a company is worth in the first place?

Marketplace host David Gura spoke with Sarah Frier of Bloomberg Business to find out.

“The founder will go out and take meetings with venture capitalists, sovereign wealth funds, institutional investors like the big banks who are trying to get in on these big deals and they’ll negotiate,” Frier says. 

Take Snapchat, for example. The company is valued at almost $15 billion — which might be proof that a messaging app is worth about as much as Campbell’s Soup, a company that actually makes food.

“What you don’t hear is the steps that it took to get there,” Frier says.

Companies are realizing how easy it is to get funded by venture capitalists. And investors are eager to provide that cash.

“It’s easy to go to investors who have fear of missing out on the next Google or Facebook. They want to get in your company early,” Frier says. 

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