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Why SAP gobbled up Concur

Fri, 2014-09-19 13:46

If you travel for work, there's a good chance you've used Concur to help itemize all those minibar receipts, your taxi cab rides and cups of coffee. Well, this week software giant SAP has scooped up Concur for more than $8 billion, in one of the largest software acquisitions ever.

What would SAP want with a company that helps people track their travel expenses?

SAP has been successful selling software to help the world's biggest companies run their operations. The challenge, says Forrester Research analyst Ted Schadler, is that the software industry is changing, and SAP has an obvious hole.

"They've been missing this big transition which is the move to what they call cloud services," he says.

Schadler says, historically, SAP has installed software at the office, but the new — and cheaper — way to run software is through these cloud services, where businesses pay to have the software run for them. Schadler says buying Concur is a signal to SAP's clients that its taking a giant step into the cloud.

"With the cloud, it's very easy to add customers quickly, and it's a lot easier to improve the cloud software," he says.

For all the potential, analysts are mixed on SAP's purchase. Morningstar senior analyst Rick Summer says Concur does little to meet the needs of SAP's core customers.

"Simply by going out and buying Concur, SAP can't walk in and say 'hey, we can make your inventory management system ready for the cloud tomorrow," Summer says, but he does believe for $8 billion, SAP has bought itself some time.

"The companies that have great, strong relationships with their customers can be patient and over years, and even over a decade move their customers over to that public cloud," he says.

Summer says it's difficult and expensive for SAP's customers to rip out their software and plug into the cloud with a competitor, but to remain an industry leader, the software giant must clarify its cloud picture soon.

SAP gobbles up Concur

Fri, 2014-09-19 13:46

If you travel for work, there's a good chance you've used Concur to help itemize all those minibar receipts, your taxi cab rides and cups of coffee. Well, this week software giant SAP has scooped up Concur for more than $8 billion, in one of the largest software acquisitions ever.

What would SAP want with a company that helps people track their travel expenses?

SAP has been successful selling software to help the world's biggest companies run their operations. The challenge, says Forrester Research analyst Ted Shadler, is that the software industry is changing, and SAP has an obvious hole.

"They've been missing this big transition which is the move to what they call cloud services," he says.

Shadler says historically SAP has installed software at the office, but the new - and cheaper - way to run software is through these cloud services, where businesses pay to have the software run for them. Shadler says buying Concur is a signal to SAP's clients that its taking a giant step into the cloud.

"With the cloud, it's very easy to add customers quickly, and it's a lot easier to improve the cloud software," he says.

For all the potential, analysts are mixed on SAP's purchase. Morningstar senior analyst Rick Summer says Concur does little to meet the needs of SAP's core customers.

"Simply by going out and buying Concur, SAP can't walk in and say 'hey, we can make your inventory management system ready for the cloud tomorrow," Summer says, but he does believe for $8 billion, SAP has bought itself some time.

"The companies that have great, strong relationships with their customers can be patient and over years, and even over a decade move their customers over to that public cloud," he says.

Summer says it's difficult and expensive for SAP's customers to rip out their software and plug into the cloud with a competitor, but to remain an industry leader, the software giant must clarify its cloud picture soon.

What's the craziest thing you've ever worn to work?

Fri, 2014-09-19 13:46

The Suitsy is a combination between a business suit... and a onesie. It’s an idea by San Francisco designer Jesse Herzog, and it is exactly what it sounds like – a onesie that looks just like a suit, complete with fake buttons and a belt. The idea is for one to look professional enough for a workplace dress code, but feel like you’re wearing pajamas. Because you are.  

Professional dress codes have changed a lot. 

“I mean, think, over the last 20 or 30 years men came to work in suit and tie, women came in jackets and skirts,” says Marcia Ruben, chair of the Department of Management at Golden Gate University Edward S. Ageno School of Business. “Over time it’s really evolved to be much more casual. I’ve been at companies where people come to work in sweat suits.”

Traditionally, dress codes were used to separate work from home, and to separate the role from the individual person playing it, says Jeffrey Sanchez-Burks, assistant professor at the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business. “One of the things you find is a trend of trying to blur this boundary more — part of it’s a generational shift, part of it’s a cultural shift.”

This shift hasn’t come to all industries equally. 

“Lawyers still wear suits and ties,” says Ruben, and the business suit is thriving in the finance industry. “But if you go into [tech] companies at least in Silicon Valley, men wear khaki pants, starched shirts, women wear pants suits, some people in sweat suits, even jeans – it’s all over the place.”

This has to do with what each industry is trying to convey to itself and to others, says Sanchez-Burks.

“There are certain industries where society would prefer there to be less change,” he says.

Banks who want you to trust them with their money are expected to communicate stability. “They set up their establishments in places that look like they were built by the Greeks and will last forever; creative accounting is a bad thing.” The traditional, expected dress code, signals a kind of stability and trust in the institution – you don’t see bankers, you see a grand institution you can trust with your money.

Likewise for doctors and their white coats – “I would be nervous if my doctor were dressed too casually,” says Ruben. In most circumstances, experimental medicine is not a selling point, whereas the authority of modern medicine is. The dress code is a way of channeling that broader identity, emphasizing the role and not the individual. 

The tech industry, however is different. It isn’t less concerned with appearance – even non-conformists are sending signals with how they dress – it’s rather about which signal. Creativity and change are the selling points. And the casual or unorthodox dress code reflects that.

“By breaking people’s expectations you’re literally signaling a sense that something new is to be learned you’re trying to accomplish something that’s not necessarily mainstream, you’re focusing on issues from a new perspective, you’re signaling a break from tradition,” says Sanchez-Burks.

In the creative industries, the individual and the role are much more closely tied. So to get the best role – production of creative ideas – you have to make the individual comfortable. “There’s a feeling that if the work atmosphere is more relaxed, than people will feel more comfortable,” says Ruben. “I think some of the larger high tech companies where people are hiring knowledge workers and looking at them to be creative and innovative, that that creates relaxation and comfort.”

Luckily for radio reporters, nobody can see what we’re wearing.

And we can't see you. Unless, of course, you tell us: What's the craziest thing you've ever gotten away with wearing to work?

A utili-kilt:

A trucker hat:

Pink fuzzy slippers:

Historic garb and more:

Scotland says no to independence. Now what?

Fri, 2014-09-19 11:30

The "no's" have it: the United Kingdom is still united as a kingdom.

Scotland's vote struck down their independence movement, 55 percent to 45 percent. The referendum posted the highest voter turnout–nearly 85 percent of the electorate–since the 1951 UK general election.

"There's a really strange atmosphere here in Glasgow, because the very vocal 'yes' campaign are now very quiet, very despondent," says the BBC's Lucy Burton. "The 'no' voters feel relief. They're not gloating, they just feel relieved."

Questions such as which currency an independent Scotland would use, or how much of the North Sea oil they would actually own, will now go unanswered, much to the 'no' campaign's relief.

Not everyone's votes, however, were economically driven, says Burton. 

"For the 'no' voters, it perhaps played an even bigger part," she said. She had gone down to interview some shipbuilders for BAA Systems, who were concerned about their jobs. Certain businesses, including the Royal Bank of Scotland, had threatened to move their headquarters to London if the 'yes' vote had won out.

On the other side, though, the 'yes' voters believed the economic concerns outlined in the days leading up to the referendum were scare tactics by design. They were also concerned that Prime Minister David Cameron's promised devolution of power to Scotland wasn't enough to meet their demands of having more Scottish power.

"In the end, it came down to a case of, 'who do you trust?' And for a lot of people, it came down to, 'what does your heart tell you?'"

 

Double Charged: Does paying back victims cost kids their futures?

Fri, 2014-09-19 11:13

Ricky Brum stood in an alleyway behind a furniture store in Manteca, California, and to be honest, it was a little awkward. He didn't really want to be there. Last February, Brum set some cardboard boxes on fire just a few feet away.

"Just that right there," he said, pointing to a black spot on the pavement. "Just a little burn mark on the floor."

Brett Myers/Youth Radio

One match did the trick, said Brum. "Like, I just sat there and was like 'Bam!'"

That "bam" changed Ricky Brum’s life. He was 15 when he set the fire. It was his first time getting in trouble with the law. He was lucky: his charges were reduced to a misdemeanor. Brum went on probation, and into juvenile hall.

Brum, and his mom Leanne, thought the worst was behind them. But then, while meeting with their public defender, they found out about restitution.

"We thought it was a joke,” said Leanne Brum.

Sitting at his kitchen table, Ricky Brum flipped through the restitution claim. Even though the fire department report said there was no damage to anything in the furniture store, the owner claimed his entire inventory of nearly 1,400 items was smoke-damaged.

The bill came out to $221,000.

The Brum family is fortunate. They own a house and have homeowner's insurance, and the insurance company went to bat for them, negotiating the restitution down to $10,000, and paying for that amount.

Restitution laws are by in large designed, to “make victims whole,” by requiring offenders to repay victims for their financial losses. Some states limit restitution for juveniles. In Missouri, restitution is capped at $4,000 for juvenile offenders. In New York, it’s $1,500. But in California, there are no limits to how much money minors can owe victims, often on top of serving time behind bars.

Christine Kroger is Ricky Brum's attorney, and she argues that restitution is anything but rehabilitative for young people. "What we see is that it’s all about punishment,” said Kroger. “For example, there's a whole caseload of kids that have satisfied every other term and condition of their probation, but they just don't get off probation because they still owe money."

Restitution can’t be erased by claiming bankruptcy. And if restitution is still owed by the time offenders turn 21, it can turn into a civil judgment. Victims can garnish up to 25 percent of offenders’ wages, can take their tax refunds and place liens on property.

Sueann Koster's grandson threw a pool party at her house while she and her husband were away on vacation. The grandson was in high school, and one of the teens who came over to swim came back and robbed her.

At the time, Koster was recuperating from breast cancer. She said, "I had done a year of chemo and my husband told me he wanted to take me on a little trip. Well, when I came back, I was not just a victim of cancer, but of a burglary."

Suanne Koster collected $8600 in restitution after her Woodland, California home was burglarized by a teen who was friends with her grandson.

Myles Bess/Youth Radio

The teen stole jewelry including her husband’s wedding band and a necklace Koster got as an anniversary gift, and in court, Koster says the teen spat at her to intimidate her from claiming restitution.

"Well, he did not realize that the more he did that, the more I was determined,” said Koster. “You know, 'You little punk. You’re not going to intimidate me.'"

Koster won $2,600 restitution for the stolen jewelry, and another $6,000 for things like mileage, lost wages and the cost of new security upgrades to her home – including the cost of spaying and neutering her new watch dogs Dorothy and Toto.  The offender still owes Koster about $1,000 in interest, but has otherwise paid the restitution in full.

Suanne Koster adopted Dorothy and Toto as guard dogs after her home was burglarized. The cost of spaying and neutering was covered by restitution. 

Myles Bess/Youth Radio

Payment is rare. There are no statewide statistics on juvenile restitution, but Youth Radio collected numbers from three of California’s largest counties and found that less than 30 percent of restitution amounts are paid.

"I think that people recognize there are certain dollar amounts that are not going to be paid at all, ever," said Roger Chan, who runs the East Bay Children’s Law Offices in Oakland. Juvenile law, said Chan, is about reform, giving young people a chance to start over. However, Chan argues that restitution too often gets in the way because it saddles kids with unreasonably high debt.

"If you order such a huge amount of restitution to a young person who has no ability to pay it, how meaningful is that as a consequence?” said Chan. “Is that really an effective way for the young person to be rehabilitated, and is that really beneficial to victims?"

Chan is trying to change California’s law to let judges consider a kid’s ability to pay. It’s not just for the benefit of young offenders, Chan says, it’s for victims too – because when restitution sums are realistic, he says victims are more likely to get paid.

To say that juvenile restitution is complicated is an understatement. It’s a process that wrestles with two competing philosophies around the idea of justice: justice for victims who have the right to be paid for their losses – even when the offender spends time in jail -- and justice for juvenile offenders, who need to be held accountable, but also allowed to move on from their crimes, and from the system.

What's the new normal for the housing market?

Fri, 2014-09-19 10:50

Susan Wachter, Professor of Real Estate and Finance at the University of Pennsylvania, explains the 'new normal' in the housing market:

Lizzie O'Leary: “What do you think about the kind of lending standards we have seen post-crisis? Because there’s arguments to be made that lending standards were really lax before the crisis, but then at the same time that now credit is so hard to get for a lot of people. Is there a median point that the economy should try to hit?

Susan Wachter: “Lenders have tightened up. Standards have tightened up. Way beyond where they were in the period before the crisis. As well they should. But they’ve gone beyond that. So, if you compare credit standards today to where they were in 2001, which was a period way before the crisis, where we had earlier decades of lending that [was] reasonable, responsible, sustainable, we’re not there yet. Standards have eased up slightly over this past year, but they’re far tighter than historically were their norm. So, why is that? In part it’s because of the experience of lenders, that if they make a mistake on the loan that loan is coming back to them. Reps and warranties are going to prevail. So they’re being extremely careful. We need a solution to that problem and we’re not there yet, but the solution that we have right now, which is keeping hundreds of thousands of people in renter-ship who would sustainably be able to be home owners- that solution is where we should be pushing towards.”

O'Leary: “Warren Buffet gave an interview a while back in which he said ‘Listen, I don’t think the economy is really going to recover until housing does.’ I know you’re probably not going to like me trying to put a time frame on this, but when could you see housing really come back?”

Wachter: “Well I think housing is going to come back in the new normal frame within a year to two years. That’s not the difficult question. The question of when will housing come back so it brings us to a traditional role in wealth building, in home ownership for families as they begin their family formation period, that’s a much larger issue, and one that I don’t have an answer to.”

What have we lost in a world of constant connection?

Fri, 2014-09-19 09:55

There was a moment, a few years ago, that Michael Harris felt digitally overloaded.

So Harris quit his job and went offline.

Harris explores this experience in his new book “The End of Absence: Reclaiming What We’ve Lost in a World of Constant Connection”.

“Soon enough, nobody will remember life before the Internet. What does this unavoidable fact mean?

For future generations, it won’t mean anything very obvious. They will be so immersed in online life that questions about the Internet’s basic purpose or meaning will vanish.

But those of us who have lived both with and without the crowded connectivity of online life have a rare opportunity. We can still recognize the difference between 'Before and After.' We catch ourselves idly reaching for our phones at the bus stop. Or we notice how, mid-conversation, a fumbling friend dives into the perfect recall of Google.”

Is the Internet taking us back in time? The return of handmade goods

Fri, 2014-09-19 09:43

Jody Rice fell in love with needlework as a child. After an unfulfilling series of jobs in film, Rice decided to quit her 9-5 life.

Her online business of digital patterns may sound modern, but Jody feels her colorful, geometric graphics actually get back to where cross-stitch started, thousands of years ago. Jody lives off her business full time, and connects to an entire community who appreciate her reinterpretation of this ancient form of decoration. 

Click play above to hear her story

Will Jack Ma’s quirkiness play in the U.S.?

Fri, 2014-09-19 09:35

There’s no two ways about it. 

Jack Ma is a quirky guy.

From dressing up like Lady Gaga, to belting out the "Lion King" theme song, to revealing on CNBC that his hero is, the decidedly fictional, Forrest Gump.

Jack Ma is Jack Ma. 

And Jack Ma is not the buttoned up (or turtle-necked up) CEO that we’re accustomed to.

But don’t let his antics fool you.

"Everyone seems to underestimate Jack Ma," says Porter Erisman, former Alibaba VP and director of the documentary 'Crocodile in in the Yangtze.'

He calls Jack Ma "incredibly  innovative, very visionary."

Ma is also ambitious. And to achieve his goal of reaching an audience outside of China, some think he'll need to tone his antics down a bit.

"The particular quirky flamboyance that he has historically displayed seems to sell very well there," says Max Wolff, an economist at Manhattan Venture Partners, which helped institutional investors get Alibaba shares. "It won't sell quite as well for a global audience."

But Ma’s flash doesn't seem to be scaring off investors today. Even though the company is set up in such a way that Ma will be in control, not shareholders.

Thousands line up to exchange Ray Rice jersey

Fri, 2014-09-19 08:43

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell had a press conference today. He said, again, that he's sorry he handled the Ray Rice incident the way he did, that the NFL will do all it can to assist groups that fight domestic violence and that he hasn't thought about resigning.

But on a day when Apple fans lined up by the thousands to get their hands on the iPhone 6, so too did Ravens fans line up at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore.

Also by the thousands.

To trade in their No. 27 Ray Rice jerseys.

This is not a line for the new #iPhone! Thousands line up to exchange @ravens #RayRice jersey at #M&TBankStadium pic.twitter.com/W3VBwJHjVX

— Kelly Blanco (@KellyNBC6) September 19, 2014

The numbers for September 19, 2014

Fri, 2014-09-19 07:39

Alibaba founder Jack Ma is having a great morning. After a record-breaking IPO, the Chinese e-commerce company began trading Friday at $92.70, the New York Times reported. That price values the company at more than $228.5 billion.

While we calculate just how much human hair you could buy with that, here are some other stories we're reading — and numbers we're watching — Friday.

55 percent

In a much more decisive vote than expected, the majority of Scots elected to keep the country in the United Kingdom overnight Friday. The full results show a huge turnout, and the BBC reported that the vote has resonated around the world, from secessionists in Spain to state media in China. 

23,000

That's the number of people killed annually by issues stemming form antibiotic-resistance. The White House launched a new initiative to combat the public health threat Thursday, the Times reported, with a $20 million prize for the development of a better resistance test and a suggested $1.7 billion in funding for research and other initiatives.

$400 million

In an unprecedented sponsorship deal, Microsoft reportedly paid the NFL $400 million to get hundreds of its Surface tablets on the sidelines and in coaches booths for the next several seasons. But the Los Angeles Times reported that announcers keep accidentally calling the tablets "iPads," showing just how much Microsoft's key rival owns the tablet industry.

The risks and rewards of Alibaba's IPO

Fri, 2014-09-19 06:54

Alibaba ticks two boxes that get investors very excited: China and technology.

That has investors “salivating,” says Steven Davidoff Solomon, a professor at University of California Berkeley School of Law.

The massive Chinese e-commerce site Alibaba will start trading on the New York Stock Exchange Friday, using the ticker “BABA.” Shares will start at $68, the top of the company’s price range.

There are more people and companies interested in buying stock than there are shares available, but some experts advise caution.

Davidoff Solomon says investors should be aware that the deal is structured in such a way that they’re actually buying into a Cayman Islands company that will receive profits from Alibaba.

“Let’s say that Alibaba China decides just not to pay on those profits,” he explains. “Shareholders would have to sue a Cayman Islands company, gain control of it, and have that Cayman Islands company sue in China. Good luck with that.”

Second, a small group of insiders will retain control of the company and appoint directors, even though they’ll own a small percentage of its shares.

The question then is whether the price is worth these risks.

Matt Turlip, an analyst with PrivCo, has done his own valuation and thinks Alibaba’s shares are actually worth $100 each.

“It’s a giant, profitable company right now that’s growing like a startup still,” says Turlip.

So buy or buyer beware – you decide.

PODCAST: The nuance of inflation

Fri, 2014-09-19 03:00

We have screens at the ready here to watch what happens when stock in the massive Chinese online commerce operation, Alibaba, starts trading in New York. Shares will start at $68, the top of the company's range. But while many investors are eagerly diving in, others are advising caution. Plus, as we've been hearing, the Scots have voted to stay with the United Kingdom, and this--among other things--has a bearing on interest rates. And as Marketplace celebrates its 25th birthday this year, we are looking at the surprising, sometimes delightful and sometimes destructive ways that prices have changed during that quarter century. Last week, we heard a classical definition of inflation from the Harvard professor who literally wrote the textbook definition. But price changes have many causes and can effect people with varying incomes quite differently. Today, we talk to Dean Baker, co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington.

Weekend Brunch: AliBaba's IPO and the Fed's new normal

Fri, 2014-09-19 02:12

Venessa Wong from Bloomberg and Business Insider's Nicholas Carlson chat about the week's news. Click play above to hear them break down the Federal Reserve's latest decision and the AliBaba IPO.

Brunch reading list:

Bloomberg: 3 Photos That Help Explain the Frenzy Over Alibaba's IPO

Businessweek: I Used Alibaba to Make 280 Pairs of Brightly Colored Pants

CNBC: Fed will end QE next month, 'considerable time' remains

Washington Post: Federal Reserve details new exit strategy, keeps record-low rate

 

 

 

Want to sell a house? Head West. Want to buy? Go East.

Fri, 2014-09-19 02:00

Online real estate site Zillow released a study on Friday that listed the markets for sellers and buyers in the United States. 

Stan Humphries, Zillow's chief economist said the lists show an east/west divide.  

Most of the best markets for sellers, says Humphries, are on the West Coast. Markets like San Jose, San Francisco and Seattle top the list. Most of the cities that favor buyers are in the east and midwest. 

"Markets like Providence, Cleveland and Philadelphia. And it’s not necessarily by historical standards that they’re bad markets," Humphries said. 

He said home prices in many of the buyers' markets haven’t risen as sharply, but that also means that when the market slows, home prices won’t crash as hard.

Kevin Hamilton knows all about seller’s markets. He’s with Red Oak Realty in the San Francisco Bay Area.

"You know a lot people think realtors are really excited about this hot market, and truthfully we’re not," he said. 

Hamilton said right now, buyers are offering way too much for houses. While responsible realtors advise against such irrational behavior, he said, when the market slows and prices crash, clients don’t remember.

"Everyone kinda came back and said, 'Why did you tell me to buy this?'" Hamilton said. "You know, well, if you looked back at that day, we didn’t."

Silicon Tally - Mo Money, Mo Facebook

Fri, 2014-09-19 02:00

It's time for Silicon Tally! How well have you kept up with the week in tech news?

This week, we're joined by Jennifer Pahlka, founder and executive director of Code For America. Pahlka also recently served as the Deputy Chief Technology Officer for the United States Government.

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Why you'd pay more for a car with hand-crank windows

Fri, 2014-09-19 01:30

As Marketplace celebrates its 25th birthday this year, we are looking at the weird, delightful and destructive ways that prices have changed during that quarter century.

But first, let's take a ride...back to 1989.

Back then, the cheapest Accord sedan had just 98-horsepower, hand-crank windows, no AC, and retailed for $11,770.

A commercial for the popular automobile posits that maybe one day, someone will build a better car than the Accord...maybe.

 

 

Since then, improvements have been made, and the Honda Accord is currently the best-selling car in America.

But how has the price changed? And when you adjust for inflation, is it more or less expensive than back in 1989?

We checked in with Joe Ciaccia, general manager of Honda Manhattan, to see how much the car will set you back with today's prices. And as for how it compares to its 25 year old counterpart, the answer might surprise you.

Click the media player above to hear more on the surprising affect inflation has had on the Honda Accord.

TV Guide Network creates a POP

Thu, 2014-09-18 13:52

The TV Guide Network is breaking away from the magazine of the same name and rebranding itself as "POP."

The new network is set to launch early next year. Their new demographic? 

An 18 to 54 year old age range who are, "socially engaged and connected and who have a thirst for pop culture," according to the Hollywood Reporter. 

White House and colleges grapple with sexual assault

Thu, 2014-09-18 13:52

If you're in the business of higher education, the issue of sexual assault is on your radar.

The White House is expected to unveil a nationwide plan to address the issue Friday at the same time some 70 colleges and universities are under investigation for how they've handled sexual assault cases.

High-profile lawsuits are grabbing headlines and threatening reputations. As you may expect, all of this is getting the attention of college and university presidents and administrators. 

You don't have to look any farther than the University of California at Berkeley — one of the schools being investigated — to see that sexual violence is becoming a top concern.

This fall, the school made its sexual violence training mandatory and all but several hundred students showed up. Spokesperson Claire Holmes says the clock is ticking for the no-shows.

"If they do not complete the training by Oct. 1, we will put a hold on their registration for the spring semester," she says.

Schools around the nation have gotten the memo, says Terry Hartle, with the American Council on Education. It's certainly in university and colleges' long-term financial interest to toughen up their response to sexual assault, and Hartle says he's seen a dramatic rise in student, faculty and security training.

"That is clearly the most obvious, immediate action," he says. "It is also in many ways the easiest."

Finding ways to investigate and resolve these cases is a more complicated and difficult matter, Hartle says. There's pressure on colleges and universities to act because schools out of compliance with federal Title IX rules could lose funding for student aid.

Attorney Cari Simon, who represents victims of sexual assault, says there are businesses out there ready to offer quick fixes.

"We are seeing folks who call themselves trainers or experts who maybe haven't been around all that long saying 'Pay me this, and I'll get you in compliance.' But it's really about checking the box and not getting at the heart of the issue and changing rape culture," she says.

So, how will prospective students and their parents will know if a school is safe or not?

Diane Rosenfeld, who runs the Gender Violence Program at Harvard Law School, says people must be smart consumers and do some digging.

"See if there are dedicated resources to preventing campus sexual assault, look at statements the president has made [look at] whether the school has been sued or not," she says.

Campus sexual assault by the numbers

One in five

The big statistic here, touted by the White House task force on campus sexual assault and many lawmakers: one in five women will be sexually assaulted during her college years. That figure becomes even more concerning the portion of victims who report their attacks to police — 12 percent — and the way those numbers were found.

5,446

That's the number of respondents to the government's Campus Sexual Assault Study, where the "one in five" figure comes from. The Justice Department distributed web surveys to two major public universities and based their results on the 5,446 respondents, according to a PolitiFact analysis. That very small sample size doesn't invalidate the study's findings — which were consistent with other, wider-reaching studies — but shows just how hidden and difficult to track these crimes are.

480

In July, the Washington Post analyzed sexual assault reports at four-year colleges and universities nationwide from 2010 to 2012. According to their data, 480 schools reported no forcible sex offenses in those three years. Missouri Sen. Claire McCaskill told the Post those schools are more concerning than schools with many reported assaults, and she questions if or how they are encouraging victims to come forward.

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