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Scented emails: gimmick or game changer?

Thu, 2014-06-19 02:00

For decades, inventors have been trying to capitalize on the power of scent – the way smelling lilacs can immediately transport you to your mother’s garden, while pine reminds you of that long-past camping trip. This week, Harvard Professor David Edwards unveiled what he says is the first scented email.

Colleagues in France used the free app oSnap to send Edwards an email with a photo tagged with a handful of pre-encoded smells that were supposed to suggest champagne, macaron, and chocolate. The smells wafted out a table-top device called an oPhone, which has two mini smokestacks to release the scented vapor.

The first caveat is that the system didn’t capture a smell to transmit, but rather tried to approximate the smell by drawing on a library of scents, like “tropical” or “creamy sour.” And while the device definitely released a scent, it wasn’t easily identifiable. Rather, it had a tangy, artificial aroma.

Edwards says the technology is still a work in progress. He’ll be refining both the library of scents and the oPhone distribution system.

Moreover, he hopes his technology will be used for more than just email. He wants companies to be able to create scents for specific products – to use scents to sell.

“It could be coffee, it could be wine, it could be chocolate,” he says. “It could be a trip to the ocean.”

He’s already working with a café chain in Paris to use smells to help customers select a coffee. Eventually, he could imagine doctors or hospitals using the technology.

“The idea is, as we get more virtual, how can we create more real experiences to get people to buy or relive something?” says Lisa Bodell, CEO of FutureThink, a consulting firm focused on innovation.

That could mean augmenting virtual reality with scents to make a digital experience feel more authentic, or smelling  a “new car smell” while browsing an online dealership.

The idea of transmitting scents digitally may seem wild, says Bodell, but crazy ideas can become the next big thing depending on how they’re executed.

For smell, execution has been a stumbling block in the past, like smell-o-vision in the 1960s, or more recently when a greeting card company tried to introduce scented cards.

“The problem wasn’t getting [scent] into a card,” she says. “The problem was at the display. There were so many scents competing with each other that it didn’t work. That’s an example of an execution problem.”

The activists who changed American surveillance

Thu, 2014-06-19 01:45

The film 1971 is receiving a screening at the American Film Institute's documentary film festival, AFI DOCS, in Washington. It’s about a group of anti-war activists who broke into a Federal Bureau of Investigation office in Media, Pennsylvania, and changed the course of government surveillance.

The files they stole and mailed to journalists exposed rampant domestic surveillance, and led to the formation of the Church Committee, which ultimately led to the FISA court.

Those involved in the break-in practiced lock picking and swore off home phones to stay anonymous. But decades later identities have been revealed.

Click the audio player above to hear two of the involved activists, John and Bonnie Raines, in conversation with host of Marketplace Tech Ben Johnson.

The Raines' were unsure of what they would find in the FBI files, but they quickly discovered many that were damaging in terms of actions to intimidate anyone critical of government policy.

As to their ability to escape cature and remain anonymous for so long, John Raines credits the vastly different technological landscape.

"We were lucky to do this in an era of relative primitivism in terms of the technology of surveillance,” says Raines. 

American Apparel boots CEO

Thu, 2014-06-19 01:30

The head of American Apparel, Dov Charney, has been sacked, the board announced in a statement.

Charney built American Apparel – the clothing line known for its racy ad campaigns and emphasis on American-made products – out of a tshirt business in his dorm room at Tufts University. He was an outspoken opponent of sweatshop labor and a prominent advocate for immigration reform.

He was also a weird guy.

“It’s important that every generation there’s going to be people that push boundaries, and those are my people,” Charney told Marketplace’s Kai Ryssdal in an interview earlier in 2014. Ryssdal asked Charney what his biggest weakness was, to which he replied: “my biggest weakness is me, lock me up already. It’s obvious! Put me in a cage, I’ll be fine. You know, I’m my own worst enemy. But what can you do, I was born strange.”

Charney has been the subject of numerous lawsuits alleging sexual harassment or mistreatment, including one alleged incident where he rubbed dirt in the face of a store manager. All of the suits, which Charney and American Apparel have previously said were frivolous attempts at extracting money, have been dismissed or settled.

The board, it would appear, got tired of either the negative attention, or Charney’s personal idiosyncrasies, or both. In any case, some event appears to have given them what they needed to make a move; the board cited an “ongoing investigation into alleged misconduct.”

For now, the company’s CFO John Luttrell is taking over as interim CEO.

But succession is often difficult for large companies.

“Think about what you learned in history or the Bible,” says Joseph Bower, Baker Foundation professor at Harvard Business School. “How often were successions smooth, as opposed to how often did sons kill fathers, fathers kill sons, wars happen.”

Plus, it’s not every CEO that is cooperative. “Succession is also about power, and you’re asking someone to give up power,” he says. 

Whoever takes over American Apparel for the long haul will have a difficult challenge. The company posted a net loss of $106.3 million in 2013, a $ 5.5 million loss for the first quarter of 2014, and is selling $30.5 million in stock to pay its debts.

American Apparel also noted that the change in management may have triggered a default, a status it is negotiating with creditors.

SAT gets the rejection letter from Hampshire College

Wed, 2014-06-18 23:21

You’re a high-school senior applying to a competitive college where the SAT and ACT are optional.  You want to  skip the test, but your inner nag says, “if you don’t submit your scores, you’re not getting in.”

Starting in the fall, Hampshire College in Amherst, MA,  won’t look at your scores, even if you do submit them. Not for admissions, or to evaluate students for scholarships. The small, liberal-arts college used to make test scores optional.

It was hardly alone. Since 2005 the list of schools switching to test-optional admissions keeps growing. There are 150 top- tier schools on the list now.

But scrapping standardized tests completely can come with a cost.  Sarah Lawrence College in New York, stopped collecting SAT scores in 2005 from applicants, but went back to doing it in 2012. Without those stats, it was removed from the U.S. News & World Report college rankings.

In explaining their decision, Hampshire administrators went for the well-worn arguments about the tests’ bias against low-income and disadvantaged students.  Administrators also pointed to what they believe is an over reliance on tests, in general, as a means of evaluation:

At Hampshire, students receive detailed evaluations from professors rather than letter grades. Classroom discussions, written work, and projects are evaluated. But not, according to the school, “ through the use of “tests” in the traditional sense.”

Hampshire’s move comes not long  before the debut of a revamped SAT  in 2016. The new  test will put more focus on demonstrating knowledge and skills that the College Board —the test’s creator—believes are most important for college and career readiness.

Why a lot of recalled cars and trucks never get fixed

Wed, 2014-06-18 13:59

If history is any guide, a significant number of the cars GM has recalled this year may never get repaired, because the owners won’t end up bringing them to the shop. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says that only about 75 percent of recalled cars and trucks get fixed.

The used-car company Carfax keeps a database with the VIN number of every car or truck that’s under recall.  “Our data suggests that right now there are at least 36 million cars across the U.S. that have a recall that has not been fixed,” says *Chris Basso from Carfax.  

Older cars are less likely to get brought in, according to research from economist George Hoffer, who has studied the auto industry for decades. He says that’s partly because many are on a second or third owner— who may not be in touch with a dealer. “And, the older the car, probably you’re more fiscally challenged,” he says, “and the last thing you want is for the dealer to start mining for other things and to say, ‘You know, while you’re here, we found this.’”

Also, a lot of recall notices may have gotten tossed out as junk mail. Bill Powers, a roofing contractor from the Chicago suburbs, owns three cars. Asked if any of them had ever been recalled, he paused. “Ooh. I don’t know,” he said, and laughed, shaking his head. “I guess I should probably know if they’ve had recalls, right?”

Does he ever get mail from his car dealer he doesn’t open?  “Yeah, quite a bit.”  More rueful laughter.

In February, hoping to improve on that 75 percent rate for repairs, NHTSA required carmakers to add a big label to recall notices. It looks like this:

But that rate doesn’t sound so bad compared to recalled child car seats. According to NHTSA, just 30 percent of those get repaired.

*CORRECTION: An earlier version of this story misidentified the company that provides repair histories on used cars. The company is Carfax. The article has been corrected.

Yes, the Redskins can still sell Redskins gear

Wed, 2014-06-18 13:59

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has ruled that the Washington Redskins trademark cannot be registered because it disparages Native Americans.

But the decision is expected to have a limited financial impact: The team can still sell Redskins merchandise.

The ruling makes it harder to defend against counterfeit imports from abroad -- but it’s not like the team is suddenly very vulnerable.

“Generally speaking, if someone is selling counterfeit Redskins gear, Redskins would still be able to go to court to shut them down,” says UCLA law professor Eugene Volokh.

Team owner Daniel Snyder has resisted pressure to change the Redskin’s name. Even though a name-change would mess with traditions, it could also inspire die-hard fans to go out and spend money on new T-shirts, caps or coffee mugs.

“It would be a financial windfall for the team from a marketing standpoint,” says Dan Bruton, a sports marketing professor at San Diego State University.

But the Redskins don't appear any closer to changing the name.

In a written statement, the team’s lawyer says the Redskins plan to appeal the trademark decision.

What does the Majority Leader do? Brings in the cash

Wed, 2014-06-18 13:57

House Republicans are electing a new majority leader Thursday. What exactly does the majority leader do? Job number one: Keep the majority. To do that you need money. Lots of it. 

“The majority leader has the dirty work,” says Paul Light, professor of public policy at NYU. 

He estimates that House majority leaders spend about 30 percent of their time raising money, but it’s not just fundraising. They also have to man the firehose of campaign cash that’s gushing in.

“There is so much money," Light explains. "The majority leader has to work to see whether it can get deployed to places where it’s needed.”

Republican Kevin McCarthy of California is expected to win the House majority leader vote. He’s already raised a lot of money for other Republican House members, whose votes he'll be counting on.

“Just like the godfather did, you call on your beneficiaries to give you a service, and in this case the service is supporting him for majority leader, ” says Jack Pitney, who teaches government at Claremont McKenna College.

Of course, Democrats do this too. But it wasn’t always this intense; the money race got tougher after Republicans took control of the House after the 1994 elections, ending decades of Democratic control. Dan Glickman of Kansas was one of the Democrats voted out that year. He says now that the House is in play, you need more money to stay in control.

“I think the competitive nature of the House certainly ups the ante,” he says.

Glickman says it ups the ante for the minority leader as well, who’s also out raising money to try to reclaim control of the House. 

Smartphones: nuisance or teaching tool?

Wed, 2014-06-18 13:53

Teachers are kind of  like parents, sometimes. You push them long enough and they come around. Or sometimes, they just get tired of fighting.

Project Tomorrow, a non-profit education group, surveyed thousands of teachers, librarians and district officials in 2010, to gauge their attitudes about mobile devices in the classroom.  Sixty-three percent said they weren’t likely to allow students to use them anytime soon; 22 percent said it was likely they would allow mobile devices in class soon, and three percent said their students were already using them in the classroom.

Fast forward to 2013. Fifty-one percent said either they were already allowing mobile devices, or would likely be allowing them in the classroom.  That compares to 32 percent, who said it was unlikely they would allow phones, tablets and the rest into classrooms.

Our own unscientific survey of classroom-tech policies,  found that teachers have lots concerns about mobile devices, particularly smartphones.  Teachers worried about students being distracted, cheating on tests and more.  Even teachers who use laptops or tablets in class said smart phone use is a big problem.  

Tom Odendahl, an economics and history teacher at a Minneapolis high school, wrote that he has agreed to let some students use laptops and tablets, but can't imagine how a smartphone could be put to good use:

As I write I can envision ways to use devices, but I keep coming up against the reality of how my students use cell phones, and it is not for clarifying questions, or fact-checking my often absurd pronouncements. One popular service I have witnessed during class is shopping for prom dresses.

At the same time,  quite a few teachers said they have have started to allow smart phone use in the class.  Paul Isom is a professor at North Carolina University.

I find students generally use them appropriately, rarely perusing facebook, instagram, etc (except during breaks), and often using them to find answers to questions that come up in class. In more than one case, they've proven very helpful when a question arises. Anyway, to fight the students over laptops/phones/tablets would be tilting at windmills.

 Pam Pailes, the Dean of Students at Flour Bluff High School in Corpus Christi, Texas, is among those who will make the transition iin the fall.  Her school will switch to a "BYOD" (bring-your-own-device) policy.  Pailes says there’s more upside than downside:

In a traditional classroom, we are asking them to learn in a way that seems stodgy and boring to many young people. In their minds, they can learn so much more if they could just "find it on the internet." Allowing laptops, tablets, phones, etc., into the classroom allows us to educate students to be better cyber-citizens and helps us teach them to use the information available on the web in a balanced and appropriately skeptical.

Smartphone: nuisance or teaching tool?

Wed, 2014-06-18 13:53

Teachers are kind of  like parents, sometimes. You push them long enough and they come around. Or sometimes, they just get tired of fighting.

Project Tomorrow, a non-profit education group, surveyed thousands of teachers, librarians and district officials in 2010, to gauge their attitudes about mobile devices in the classroom.  Sixty-three percent said they weren’t likely to allow students to use them anytime soon; 22 percent said it was likely they would allow mobile devices in class soon, and three percent said their students were already using them in the classroom.

Fast forward to 2013. Fifty-one percent said either they were already allowing mobile devices, or would likely be allowing them in the classroom.  That compares to 32 percent, who said it was unlikely they would allow phones, tablets and the rest into classrooms.

Our own unscientific survey of classroom-tech policies,  found that teachers have lots concerns about mobile devices, particularly smartphones.  Teachers worried about students being distracted, cheating on tests and more.  Even teachers who use laptops or tablets in class said smart phone use is a big problem.  

Tom Odendahl, an economics and history teacher at a Minneapolis high school, wrote that he has agreed to let some students use laptops and tablets, but can't imagine how a smartphone could be put to good use:

As I write I can envision ways to use devices, but I keep coming up against the reality of how my students use cell phones, and it is not for clarifying questions, or fact-checking my often absurd pronouncements. One popular service I have witnessed during class is shopping for prom dresses.

At the same time,  quite a few teachers said they have have started to allow smart phone use in the class.  Paul Isom is a professor at North Carolina University.

I find students generally use them appropriately, rarely perusing facebook, instagram, etc (except during breaks), and often using them to find answers to questions that come up in class. In more than one case, they've proven very helpful when a question arises. Anyway, to fight the students over laptops/phones/tablets would be tilting at windmills.

 Pam Pailes, the Dean of Students at Flour Bluff High School in Corpus Christi, Texas, is among those who will make the transition iin the fall.  Her school will switch to a "BYOD" (bring-your-own-device) policy.  Pailes says there’s more upside than downside:

In a traditional classroom, we are asking them to learn in a way that seems stodgy and boring to many young people. In their minds, they can learn so much more if they could just "find it on the internet." Allowing laptops, tablets, phones, etc., into the classroom allows us to educate students to be better cyber-citizens and helps us teach them to use the information available on the web in a balanced and appropriately skeptical.

AT & T and Udacity partner up on a degree

Wed, 2014-06-18 13:51
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Getting a degree from Udacity

Wed, 2014-06-18 13:51
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Michigan's vineyards: Wine that survives the winter?

Wed, 2014-06-18 13:09

Places like California are known for growing grapes that have been around for more than a century. But there are new types of grapes that have only been around for decade or two and are allowing wine to be made in places never imagined before -- like colder Midwest states.

One winemaker who’s joining the northern wine region is Dave Anthony. He and his wife, own and run a four and a half-acre vineyard and winery in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, near the northern Lake Michigan shore.

Anthony says people were pretty surprised when he said he wanted to start a winery so far north 15 years ago.

“I think there’s some shock out there, that it actually works,” Anthony says. “The first reaction was beyond 'are you crazy?': 'It’s just stupidity, total stupidity.'”

Because the winters are cold here. This winter, temperatures in January and February were often well below zero.

But Anthony is growing what is called "cold hardy" wine grapes, and they can withstand 25 below zero temperatures. Many of these wine grapes were created by the University of Minnesota. It released its first cold hardy grape in 1996. Since then, Minnesota tripled the number of wineries in the state to 30. Iowa more than tripled the amount of grapes it’s growing.

But Anthony says the biggest challenge is the lack of name recognition for his wines.

“Who's ever heard of Marquette or La Cresent?” Anthony says.

But there already is a developed wine region in Michigan, it’s farther south near Lake Michigan, around Traverse City. It's a bit warmer there so the vineyards can grow the European varieties like Merlot and Pinot Grigio.

Charlie Edson is the owner and winemaker at Bel Lago winery near Traverse City.

He grows 100 varieties of grapes on his vineyard, including some cold hardy grapes. But he says customers like to buy wines with names that they know.

“I think it is marketable in certain circumstances. In our circumstances I probably wouldn’t go that route because consumers don’t know what those varieties are,” Edson says.

Edson says the biggest criticism of these new grapes - at least in terms of taste - is that they don’t have the same structure and character as the centuries old wines, like cabernet.

But Edson says cold hardy grapes are a type of crop insurance, considering how cold this winter was.

“There is winter injury in the vineyards right now, in most vineyards, and I can tell you the cold hardy varieties -- they laughed in the face of this winter, so we will have full crops of cold hardy varieties which is terrific,” Edson says.

That is not the case for most of the European varieties this year.

But back on the northern side of Lake Michigan, Anthony thinks this might be a wakeup call for grape growers, which might allow cold hardy grapes to expand and grow even further in the future.

Yo, $1 million. Yo.

Wed, 2014-06-18 13:03

Yo.

That's it.

Just Yo.

Capital Y; lower case O.

It's a new messaging app with a twist, I guess you could say. You can text somebody else with the Yo app. But all you can say is...Yo.

Here's the yo-crazy part: The guy who built it has moved from Israel to San Francisco. He's opened an office and hired staff. He's looking for "strategic partners."

And he's raised a million dollars from investors.

...yo.

C'mon...tell me we're not in a tech bubble.

Go ahead.

I dare you.

Yo.

San Francisco losing black residents, black businesses

Wed, 2014-06-18 11:58

During World War II, the Navy hired thousands of workers for its San Francisco Bay Area shipyards. Many were black migrants from the South who settled in the city's Fillmore District -- a neighborhood left with vacancies because of the internment of Japanese-Americans.

A vibrant black community flourished, and music venues opened up on nearly every block, hosting jazz greats like Ella Fitzgerald, Charles Mingus, and Duke Ellington. The Fillmore District was nicknamed the Harlem of the West.

In those years, if you were a black visitor to San Francisco, you most likely made a pilgrimage to Marcus Books. In 1956, the NAACP convention came to town, and Reverend Amos Brown -- then just 15-years-old -- was a delegate from Mississippi traveling with his mentor, civil rights hero Medger Evers. It was the first time Brown met Dr. Martin Luther King Jr, and the first time he visited Marcus Books.

It was an iconic institution of culture, information, sociopolitical empowerment,” Brown reminisced. “Many international scholars and thinkers and civil rights leaders appeared at Marcus bookstore.”

The store began as a publishing company, printing hard-to-find texts from black leaders like Marcus Garvey, whom the bookstore was named after.

San Francisco poet Devorah Major says her father first brought her to Marcus Books when she was two years old. Later, the store was crucial to her career as a writer.

“I did readings when my first novel went out at Barnes & Noble, and they didn’t care -- I’d have five, or six, or ten people there,” she said. “I went to Marcus, and it was standing room only. It also is a measure of support, and those turn into sales.”

Marcus Books got into financial trouble last year, and the owners couldn’t afford to keep the store open. They tried a crowdfunding campaign to help raise money to buy back the property, and their supporters rallied on the steps of City Hall. But Reverend Amos Brown says the store’s problems started long before this. Business took a hit as San Francisco’s black residents moved out.

“We’ve lost over 50,000 since 1970, and that’s tragic,” Brown said recently when I talked to him in his office at San Francisco’s Third Baptist Church, where he arrived as pastor in 1976.  In the 1960s and '70s, city redevelopment policies displaced thousands of African Americans, and segregation often made it difficult to find new housing.

Brown is now the president of the San Francisco chapter of the NAACP. The city, he says, is not as liberal and friendly towards African-Americans as its reputation might suggest.

“When it comes to employment, education, and housing opportunities, it’s not the ideal place to be in. If there is not a positive effort made to work with the African-American community to stop this hemorrhaging, I predict that in the next 5 to 10 years, there will not be 20,000 blacks left in this city.”

Black residents began leaving long before the current tech boom in the city, which has only made housing rentals even more difficult to secure. Mayor Ed Lee has committed to building 30,000 new affordable housing units in by 2020. Today, most of San Francisco’s black residents are low income renters.

Theodore Miller is director of San Francisco’s Out-Migration Initiative, the government’s latest attempt to retain black residents. One of Miller’s priorities is attracting young, college educated African-Americans to the city.

“We know the city of San Francisco is experiencing record growth across industries, and we need to make sure that African-Americans throughout the country think about San Francisco as a place to live and grow and raise their families,” he said.

But even if a new wave of black residents settles here, they’ll arrive in a city without many black-owned businesses. And Marcus Books in San Francisco won't be one of them -- it's gone for good.

This story was produced by TurnstyleNews.com, a project of Youth Radio.

Forget your wallet, text messaging is the way to go.

Wed, 2014-06-18 11:24

Bloomberg Businessweek contributor Charles Graeber spent 10 days in Kenya with only one requirement: to not use his wallet -- and to pay for everything by phone.

"I've never gone to Africa and I've never paid for anything with my phone," he said. So, intrigued by Kenya's M-pesa system ("M" stands for mobile and "pesa" means payment in Swahili). The system allows users to transfer money from phone-to-phone through text messages. Once Graeber landed in Kenya, it took him fifteen minutes to get set up with a phone, SIM card and become a client of the country’s largest mobile provider, Safaricom.

Charles was able to use his phone to pay for his taxi, book his hotel and even haggle down meat prices from the local market. This use of payment has become widely popular since its launch in 2007.

"Something like 93 percent of Kenyans with mobile phones have this... The truth is it's an alternative to banking... it is quickly becoming people's bank accounts. In fact, some people will keep their money on a SIM card, and then take that SIM card out and keep it in a cookie jar, sort of as a virtual savings account."

While the majority of Kenyans are using this method of payment, the U.S. has yet to adopt a system like this. It’s a shame, at least for Charles, who says he’s already missing it.

"You walk out the door only needing your phone… and your wallet is one less thing to forget."

How an Illinois company does businesses in Iraq

Wed, 2014-06-18 10:39

Jason Speer, President of Quality Float Works Inc., a float metal ball manufacturing company, has travelled several times to Iraq since their expansion into the troubled country:

"People still don’t even believe me, I have to show them some pictures," says Speer, about his business trips to Iraq.

Speer says he saw investing in Iraq as an opportunity.

"The country needs to be rebuilt," says Speer. "Everything has been destroyed over the years of neglect. I think there are a lot of opportunities for American businesses especially."

Doing business in Iraq is definitely not easy. Just shipping the float metal balls can be a tricky process. Speer says they work with a local business man that assists with the logistics of getting their product into the country, but sometimes their products sit for weeks at a time, just waiting for the paperwork to be handled and to be cleared.

Listen to the full interview in the audio player above.

A time to be leisurly en route to your next engagement

Wed, 2014-06-18 10:22

From the Marketplace Datebook, here's a look at what's coming up Thursday, June 19:

In Washington, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee holds a closed hearing on Iraq.

The Conference Board is scheduled to release its monthly index of leading economic indicators.

Let's all slow down and maybe wear something fetching for World Sauntering Day.

And "The Rocky Horror Show" stage production opened on June 19, 1973 at a small 63 seat theatre in London. Wider audiences were exposed to the film version. A toast!

Amazon likely to unveil new smart phone

Wed, 2014-06-18 04:00

The online retailing giant Amazon is expected to unveil a smart phone at a media event in Seattle today, with tech observers buzzing over the anticipated bells-and-whistles-like 3D features.

But many think the phone will largely function as a handheld shopping cart that you can then fill with more of Amazon's stuff.

“They want you to interact with them five, ten times a day, and the mobile phone is a great way to ensure that Amazon is there whenever you might need something,” says James McQuivey, a media analyst with Forrester Research.

McQuivey says an Amazon phone might also include a built-in payment system that could be used with any retailer.

Colin Gillis, senior technology analyst with the brokerage firm BGC Financial, thinks the phone might well be free. Same goes for the data if you're, say, downloading music from Amazon.

“It's the classic razor and blades. You can have the razor for free as long as you keep buying blades from us,” Gillis says.

Even so, Gillis thinks a smart phone won't bust Amazon out of its low profit margins.

The ‘Maker Movement’ heads to Washington

Wed, 2014-06-18 03:30

Some say that America is becoming a country of paper-pushers; that we aren’t actually making much real stuff anymore. But grassroots designers and fabricators are looking to change that perception. Today these so-called makers are gathering at the White House for a kind of trade fair to promote their businesses and their movement.

Jules Pieri, CEO of The Grommet, who helped shape the event, joins Marketplace Morning Report host David Brancaccio to discuss.

Click the audio player above to hear Jules Pieri in conversation with Marketplace Morning Report host David Brancaccio

PODCAST: Guardians of interest rates

Wed, 2014-06-18 03:00

In advance of the press conference coming out of the Federal Reserve's two-day meeting, a look at what to expect from Chair Janet Yellen. Plus, more on the debut of the amazon phone. Also, while some criticize the U.S. for not making anything anymore, several fabricators and makers head to Washington, D.C. as part of the 'maker movement.'

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