National / International News

VIDEO: PM wants Lansley as UK commissioner?

BBC - Thu, 2014-06-05 04:01
Andrew Lansley implies the prime minister asked him to be the UK's next European Commissioner.

Day in pictures: 5 June 2014

BBC - Thu, 2014-06-05 03:58
News photos from past 24 hours: 5 June

AUDIO: The decline of teen magazines for girls

BBC - Thu, 2014-06-05 03:51
Marina Gask and Daisy Buchanan discuss the decline of teen magazines in the digital age.

Is vocal fry hurting women's job prospects?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-06-05 03:48

A new set of data suggests that vocal fry -- or vocal creakiness -- could negatively impact female job applicants. The study, published by the online journal PLOS, played samples of male and female subjects speaking in both a normal voice and with vocal fry. Participants were then surveyed as to which candidates they found to be more suitable to hire for a job. 

While a preference for a normal speaking voice was nearly equally matched for both men and women -- results show a preference for a normal voice 86 percent of the time for female speakers and 83 percent of the time for male speakers -- those surveyed reacted more negatively to women with vocal fry than men.

Olga Khazan, who covered the topic for The Atlantic, joins Marketplace's Mark Garrison to discuss the study and its implications for women in the workplace. Click on the audio player above to hear more.

Do you prefer a normal voice or fry voice? Click below to hear the vocal samples from the study:

 

Is vocal fry hurting women's job prospects?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-06-05 03:48

A new set of data suggests that vocal fry -- or vocal creakiness -- could negatively impact female job applicants. The study, published by the online journal PLOS, played samples of male and female subjects speaking in both a normal voice and with vocal fry. Participants were then surveyed as to which candidates they found to be more suitable to hire for a job. 

While a preference for a normal speaking voice was nearly equally matched for both men and women -- results show a preference for a normal voice 86 percent of the time for female speakers and 83 percent of the time for male speakers -- those surveyed reacted more negatively to women with vocal fry than men.

Olga Khazan, who covered the topic for The Atlantic, joins Marketplace's Mark Garrison to discuss the study and its implications for women in the workplace. Click on the audio player above to hear more.

Do you prefer a normal voice or fry voice? Click below to hear the vocal samples from the study:

 

Cave-Dwelling In Spain Offers A Welcome Inconvenience

NPR News - Thu, 2014-06-05 03:48

In the province of Granada in Southern Spain, thousands of people live completely unplugged in caverns. The caves have been a place of refuge for centuries. Now they provide a new kind of escape.

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VIDEO: 'We are apes in denial' over religion

BBC - Thu, 2014-06-05 03:46
Religion has "far too strong and subtle control" over society, says James singer Tim Booth, in a personal film.

AUDIO: Missing girl hoaxer 'will be back'

BBC - Thu, 2014-06-05 03:44
A father, who was harassed by a woman pretending to be his missing daughter, fears she will return after jail.

'Extreme concern' over biker deaths

BBC - Thu, 2014-06-05 03:34
A spike in motorcycle road deaths among mainly middle-aged men is of extreme concern, says the Dyfed-Powys Police commissioner.

Bergdahl's Hometown Cancels Celebration Of His Return

NPR News - Thu, 2014-06-05 03:29

Organizers of a rally held in Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl's honor while he was a prisoner say they're canceling this year's event, citing backlash over the prisoner swap that freed him.

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Caption Challenge: Plastic Goethes

BBC - Thu, 2014-06-05 03:19
It's the Caption Challenge. Oh yes it is.

Trial for Venezuela opposition leader

BBC - Thu, 2014-06-05 03:13
Jailed Venezuelan opposition leader Leopoldo Lopez must go on trial on charges related to mass anti-government protests, a judge rules.

Book News: Experimental Debut Novel Wins Prestigious Baileys Prize

NPR News - Thu, 2014-06-05 03:05

Also: A book at one of Harvard's libraries is "without a doubt bound in human skin"; J.K. Rowling has released an excerpt of her new novel.

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Bank keeps UK rates on hold at 0.5%

BBC - Thu, 2014-06-05 03:00
UK interest rates are kept on hold at the record low of 0.5% for another month by the Bank of England.

The Clippers' price tag could catch on

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-06-05 02:59

The world of business has been abuzz about the $2 billion sale of the Los Angeles Clippers to former Microsoft executive Steve Ballmer, and for good reason -- $2 billion is nearly quadruple the previous record for an NBA team (last month's $550 million price tag for the Milwaukee Bucks).

"I think this sets a new bar for pricing," says Matt Powell analyst with SportsOneSource. "It’s like the real estate market, right? What’s your comparable? And I think this is always going to be thrown up in people’s faces about what a team is worth."

$2 billion might not be as crazy as it sounds when you consider a couple of factors, like "the size of the LA market and the fact that there’s a big pending TV contract coming up and quite a few interested bidders," says David Carter, director of USC’s Sports Business Institute. "The number on the surface seems a little bit high, but when you peel it back, ultimately, it might make sense."

The Clippers brought in an estimated $128 million dollars in revenue last year, according to Forbes. That's a far cry from $2 billion, but sports teams tend to be reliable earners. "Franchise values are going to continue to climb," says Carter. "We’ve seen nothing short of a real appetite for sports content and fans consuming it so many different ways."

Carter also points out that a team like the Clippers actually coming up for sale is a rare window of opportunity.

 

The Clippers' price tag could catch on

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-06-05 02:59

The world of business has been abuzz about the $2 billion sale of the Los Angeles Clippers to former Microsoft executive Steve Ballmer, and for good reason -- $2 billion is nearly quadruple the previous record for an NBA team (last month's $550 million price tag for the Milwaukee Bucks).

"I think this sets a new bar for pricing," says Matt Powell analyst with SportsOneSource. "It’s like the real estate market, right? What’s your comparable? And I think this is always going to be thrown up in people’s faces about what a team is worth."

$2 billion might not be as crazy as it sounds when you consider a couple of factors, like "the size of the LA market and the fact that there’s a big pending TV contract coming up and quite a few interested bidders," says David Carter, director of USC’s Sports Business Institute. "The number on the surface seems a little bit high, but when you peel it back, ultimately, it might make sense."

The Clippers brought in an estimated $128 million dollars in revenue last year, according to Forbes. That's a far cry from $2 billion, but sports teams tend to be reliable earners. "Franchise values are going to continue to climb," says Carter. "We’ve seen nothing short of a real appetite for sports content and fans consuming it so many different ways."

Carter also points out that a team like the Clippers actually coming up for sale is a rare window of opportunity.

 

Burwell's highest priority: get more Latinos insured

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-06-05 02:59

The Senate votes today on the nomination of Sylvia Mathews Burwell for Health and Human Services Secretary. And it’s a pretty good bet that high on her priority list will be enrolling Latinos in the Affordable Care Act. 

Latinos have the highest uninsured rates compared to other ethnic groups. They're also a younger segment of the overall population, and The White House has said enrolling young, healthy people is one of the keys to the success of the ACA.

So how to go about enrolling more Latinos in the ACA? Take Houston, Texas, for example, where nearly half the population is Latino, and where Benjamin Hernandez is assistant director of Health and Human Services.  He says one thing the new Secretary could do to help him boost Latino enrollment would be to give him access to real time data on who is signing up and where they live.

“That is very helpful to us because we shift resources and people into those communities that aren’t getting the message,” says Hernandez.

Targeting those who aren’t getting the message is also the mission of Anne Filipic. She is president of Enroll America, which has collected data from the first enrollment period and is studying it to determine what got people to sign up for healthcare. “Specifically for Latinos, we do see that the in-person assistance, the presence in communities goes along way,” says Filipic.

Enroll America found that people who had personal assistance were about twice as likely to enroll, compared to people who just went online.  And Latinos and African-Americans were 43 percent more likely to seek that assistance than their white counterparts. 

Filipic says it’s also important for the new secretary of Health and Human Services to provide resources for on-the-ground workers in underserved communities, “and to make sure that they have the bilingual tools to reach consumers.”

Burwell's highest priority: get more Latinos insured

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-06-05 02:59

The Senate votes today on the nomination of Sylvia Mathews Burwell for Health and Human Services Secretary. And it’s a pretty good bet that high on her priority list will be enrolling Latinos in the Affordable Care Act. 

Latinos have the highest uninsured rates compared to other ethnic groups. They're also a younger segment of the overall population, and The White House has said enrolling young, healthy people is one of the keys to the success of the ACA.

So how to go about enrolling more Latinos in the ACA? Take Houston, Texas, for example, where nearly half the population is Latino, and where Benjamin Hernandez is assistant director of Health and Human Services.  He says one thing the new Secretary could do to help him boost Latino enrollment would be to give him access to real time data on who is signing up and where they live.

“That is very helpful to us because we shift resources and people into those communities that aren’t getting the message,” says Hernandez.

Targeting those who aren’t getting the message is also the mission of Anne Filipic. She is president of Enroll America, which has collected data from the first enrollment period and is studying it to determine what got people to sign up for healthcare. “Specifically for Latinos, we do see that the in-person assistance, the presence in communities goes along way,” says Filipic.

Enroll America found that people who had personal assistance were about twice as likely to enroll, compared to people who just went online.  And Latinos and African-Americans were 43 percent more likely to seek that assistance than their white counterparts. 

Filipic says it’s also important for the new secretary of Health and Human Services to provide resources for on-the-ground workers in underserved communities, “and to make sure that they have the bilingual tools to reach consumers.”

China criticises Windows 8 security

BBC - Thu, 2014-06-05 02:58
Microsoft's Windows 8 is branded a threat to China's cybersecurity in a state-backed news report.

Pirlo could destroy England - Scholes

BBC - Thu, 2014-06-05 02:55
Paul Scholes says England cannot afford to underestimate Andrea Pirlo again when they take on Italy in their World Cup opener.
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