National / International News

AUDIO: NFB: Cut VAT to stop cash payments

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-09 03:04
Cutting VAT on home refurbishment would tempt people away from paying builders cash-in-hand, the NFB claims.

Man, 62, dies following flat fire

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-09 03:01
A 62-year-old man dies in hospital after being injured in a flat fire in Edinburgh's Wester Hailes.

Rare disease screening for newborns

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-09 02:59
The heel-prick blood test will now also test for a number of rare conditions.

Russia in expanded military parade

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-09 02:51
Thousands of Russian soldiers take part in an expanded military parade to mark the end of WW2, amid a surge of patriotism over the Crimea annexation.

Class of 2014 isn't celebrating the job market

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-05-09 02:47

This weekend, college seniors and their families will hear a lot of stirring words from commencement speakers as graduation season gets into full swing.

What comes next for many will be a little less stirring: the job hunt.

"The Class of 2014 is a little bit better off than the few classes who came before," says researcher Alyssa Davis, co-author of a report, 'The Class of 2014: The Weak Economy is Idling Too Many Young Graduates,' for the Economic Policy Institute. "Since the recession, this has become the new normal, with a weak job market, stagnant wages, high unemployment and underemployment."

Unemployment for young college graduates is 8.5 percent, compared to 5.5 percent in 2007. For young high school graduates, the comparison is 22.9 percent to 15.9 percent.

Employers do plan to hire more than last year—an increase of 8.6 percent is projected in a survey of employers by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE). But still, rates of involuntary part-time work, unskilled and low-wage work are up for college graduates. And, according to EPI's research, many more young people are now out of the labor force entirely—unemployed and not looking for work or attending school—than before the recession.

Management consulting firm Accenture recently surveyed Class of '14 members about their post-college expectations. Managing director Katherine LaVelle says, at least today's college students are prepared—having come of age as teenagers and early-twenty-somethings in an unforgiving economy that hasn't improved quickly or dramatically. She says many have picked their majors and internships with job prospects in mind.

"They've done their homework, they understand the marketplace they're in, and they're ready to tackle it," says LaVelle.

Still, says LaVelle, they're full of unrealistic expectations. Eighty percent think their first employer will provide a formal training program, and roughly the same percentage think they'll make more than $25,000-a-year. But the Accenture survey finds that only half that many graduates from the classes of 2012 and 2013 actually got training or earned that much.

And 46 percent of recent graduates consider themselves underemployed, working in jobs that don't require the education and training they received in college.

Pistorius ballistics questioned

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-09 02:37
A ballistics expert at the murder trial of South African athlete Oscar Pistorius questions the state's version of how he shot his girlfriend.

Why China and Vietnam are bumping boats

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-05-09 02:32

There's a battle brewing in the South China Sea. Ownership of territory near the Paracel Islands is disputed, and after China moved an oil drilling rig into the area, Vietnam sent ships to investigate.

The Chinese rammed the Vietnamese crafts and shot them with water cannons, but this fight is a lot bigger than one Chinese oil rig.

"It involves not just China and Vietnam, but also Taiwan, the Philippines, Brunei and Malaysia," says Taylor Fravel, a professor of political science at MIT. Fravel notes that border disputes in the area have been going on for decades and this is China's way of trying to demonstrate its claim to the territory.

"China is desperate for domestic sources of energy," says Ernie Bower, senior adviser for Southeast Asia Studies at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

Bower says there's potentially more gas under the waters in the disputed territories than in the Gulf of Mexico, and more oil than in Alaska. The U.S. Geological survey says it's likely there are 2.5 billion barrels of oil, yet to be tapped in the area.

"People have been shot at and killed before between these two countries on these very waters," Bower says, noting the fight is also about fish, a source of protein to feed enormous populations.

It's a very real dispute for the Vietnamese, says Bowers, with the location where the Chinese attacked the Vietnamese ships just 120 miles off its shore.

"And the Vietnamese are rightly concerned about their sovereignty."

Allardyce not expecting West Ham sack

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-09 02:24
West Ham boss Sam Allardyce says there is "no indication" from co-owner David Sullivan his position is under threat.

VIDEO: Floatels: Hotels for the open sea

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-09 02:20
How do you build a floating hotel that can withstand 100ft waves? The BBC's Sharanjit Leyl gets a tour of the technology behind the latest 'floatel'.

Pressure mounts over US net rules

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-09 02:19
A group of more than 50 venture capitalists add their voice to growing opposition for US plans to change net-neutrality laws

VIDEO: Tech review: This week's headlines

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-09 02:15
The fridge, washing machine and cooker that can be controlled by text message, plus other tech news.

'Skull Cracker' in court over raid

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-09 02:14
A man known as the "Skull Cracker" appears in court accused of committing an armed robbery while being unlawfully at large from an open prison.

Warm Texas wind blows green for Mars

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-09 01:59
Warm Texas wind blows green for Mars

Ferry relatives protest in S Korea

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-09 01:57
Relatives of passengers aboard a ferry that sank last month try to make their way to South Korea's presidential office to demand a meeting.

Sex attack boys enticed into cars

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-09 01:56
Two boys are enticed into cars in Leicester and sexually assaulted in two separate incidents which could be linked, police say.

'Wee Oscar' dies after cancer battle

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-09 01:56
Oscar Knox, the County Antrim boy whose long battle against an aggressive form of cancer captured the hearts of many people in Northern Ireland, has died.

Jones and Rooney fit for World Cup

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-09 01:49
Manchester United interim boss Ryan Giggs says England's Phil Jones and Wayne Rooney will be fit for the World Cup in Brazil.

Hamilton edges Button in practice

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-09 01:42
Lewis Hamilton sets the fastest time in first practice for the Spanish Grand Prix, almost a second ahead of Jenson Button.

Wenger wants FFP rule-breakers banned

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-09 01:41
Arsenal boss Arsene Wenger says Uefa should exclude clubs that break financial fair play regulations from European competition.

The best conversations happen over brunch

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-05-09 01:37

Here in the New York Bureau of Marketplace, we're getting ready for brunch. We even have the fixings for mimosas.

Yes, in the middle of the week. And, yes, in the middle of a work day.

But brunch, or really "Marketplace Brunch" is one of the segments we're trying out for our new show, Marketplace Weekend. The idea is to take some of the really smart and creative people inside the Marketplace family, and have the kind of conversation you might have over a meal with your friends... but do it on the radio.

So I'll be gathering in the studio with people like Stacey Vanek Smith, Sabri Ben-Achour and Mark Garrison, to talk about what they're covering. And probably more importantly: what's on their mind as they look ahead to the week that's coming up.

All this is part of how you create a new show: You come up with ideas for segments, try them out, and see how they sound. Earlier, we tried a segment that took responses from Twitter and Facebook, and folded them into a personal finance conversation. I'll let you into a secret: it sounded awful! Nobody (even my mother) wants to listen to me reading a bunch of tweets. So we reworked it, with a listener calling in to talk about her student loan debt. And that version was great!

We want to make sure that Marketplace Weekend is fun and dynamic, and that we never lose sight of where human experiences fit in economic stories.

A while back, we did a story on Marketplace Money that examined gentrification. It's a model for where we want to go with the new show.

We introduced listeners to Britty Krone, a lifelong Harlem resident. She took me on a tour of her neighborhood and told about the changes that were happening, and what it felt like to live through them.

Gentrification is a huge story: it touches on policy, politics, housing prices, race, and the changing nature of our cities. But at its heart, it's really a story about human beings. Brittny's example was a good reminder of that.

As we create this new show, we want to keep doing stories like that: complex, multi-layered, and demanding a little extra thought and care.

We also want your input. So keep it coming! Tell us what you want in Marketplace Weekend. The kinds of stories and sounds that you want to listen to when you have your own... well... brunch. 

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