National / International News

VIDEO: Nigel Farage: 'I was deeply shocked'

BBC - Fri, 2015-03-20 03:11
UKIP leader Nigel Farage has said he was shocked to find out about allegations of a "serious financial nature" against UKIP MEP Janice Atkinson.

Brigade fined over firefighter death

BBC - Fri, 2015-03-20 03:11
The Scottish Fire and Rescue service is fined £54,000 after admitting health and safety breaches that contributed to a firefighter's death.

Australia hold nerve to reach semis

BBC - Fri, 2015-03-20 03:09
Australia withstand a pulsating spell from Pakistan's Wahab Riaz to set up a meeting with India in the World Cup semi-finals.

Tunisia president to address nation

BBC - Fri, 2015-03-20 03:06
The president of Tunisia is to address the nation, two days after the museum attack that killed 23 people, mostly foreign tourists.

Blackpool fans to watch AFC Blackpool

BBC - Fri, 2015-03-20 03:02
Blackpool fans plan to protest against the club's owners, the Oyston family, by going to watch AFC Blackpool on Saturday instead.

PODCAST: A grande race relations conversation

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-03-20 03:00

An announcement from Tesla in the I'll-believe-it-when-I-see-it category. More on that. Plus, Starbucks said this week it wanted to use its big retail footprint to foster a conversation on race in America. It hasn’t gone as planned, as critics have panned the effort as ham-handed. We look at ways companies have had success in talking about diversity and inclusion. And women with limited education beyond high school, especially single working mothers, earn less than men. They’re often shunted into minimum-wage unskilled jobs—in the Wendy’s drive-through or behind the register at Rite-Aid. At the same time, the skilled trades are begging for new recruits: electricians, welders, machinists. There are initiatives to bring women into these traditionally male-dominated professions (by labor unions, community colleges, employer groups). But it’s not an easy gig to work—with a bunch of men on a building site or a machine-shop floor.

Solar eclipse finishes in NI

BBC - Fri, 2015-03-20 02:59
A rare eclipse of the sun in Northern Ireland which was visible to many ends.

VIDEO: Moment of total eclipse over Svalbard

BBC - Fri, 2015-03-20 02:57
Millions of people in the UK and northern Europe have observed spectacular scenes as the Moon passed between the Earth and the Sun.

'Cash dash' fear in pension overhaul

BBC - Fri, 2015-03-20 02:53
Pension policyholders have been warned not to be tempted to "dash for the cash" when the new rules come into effect in April.

VIDEO: Anonymity sought for sex crime suspects

BBC - Fri, 2015-03-20 02:44
People arrested for sexual offences in England and Wales could have their identities protected if a cross-party group of MPs get their way.

Contraceptive implant for girl, 11

BBC - Fri, 2015-03-20 02:37
An 11-year-old is among more than 600 girls under the age of 16 in Northern Ireland given contraceptive implants in the last five years.

VIDEO: Six Nations meets Game of Thrones

BBC - Fri, 2015-03-20 02:28
The Six Nations gets the Game of Thrones treatment, with everyone asking 'who will wear the crown'?

Indian train derails killing many

BBC - Fri, 2015-03-20 02:06
A passenger train derails in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, killing at least 30 people and leaving dozens injured.

Tax receipts cut government borrowing

BBC - Fri, 2015-03-20 02:06
Britain's public finances improve in February with government borrowing down by a third from a year earlier thanks to a pick up in seasonal income tax payments.

Michelle Obama promotes girls' education in Asia

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-03-20 02:00

First lady Michelle Obama is traveling in Asia this week to promote a new initiative with the Peace Corps aimed at closing the education gap for girls. Around the world, an estimated 62 million girls between the ages of 6 and 15 are not in school. The Peace Corps plans to recruit and train at least 650 new volunteers to help remove the barriers to education in developing countries like Albania, Cambodia, Georgia, and Uganda.

The economic payoff can be significant, says Sarah Lynch, a senior director of the global charity Care, which will help train volunteers. "Investments in girls' education have proven to go further than any other spending in global development," she says.

Click the media player above to hear more.

 

Tesla plans to launch 'autopilot' feature this summer

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-03-20 02:00

Tesla announced a few software updates it’s planning for its electric vehicles on Thursday, including one where the car tracks its distance from charging stations to try to alleviate driver anxiety about running out of juice. CEO Elon Musk said that the company could push another update — autopilot — to its Model S fleet as soon as June.

While Musk said cars would be technically capable of getting from place to place without a driver having to do anything, initially this feature limited to use on highways, as neighborhoods pose safety issues given their many obstacles and variables. Eventually, drivers could also summon their cars or let the vehicles park themselves.

Mike Wall, an auto analyst at IHS, says this move echoes steps taken by other car companies and that driver-less technology is advancing faster than regulations that will govern its use.

Michelle Krebs, an analyst with AutoTrader, says driverless cars could be on the road tomorrow, but manufacturers are holding back because of regulatory concerns and questions about who’s to blame if there’s an accident. Tesla believes its autopilot feature meets current regulations. 

Michelle Obama promotes girls' education in Asia

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-03-20 02:00

First lady Michelle Obama is traveling in Asia this week to promote a new initiative with the Peace Corps aimed at closing the education gap for girls. Around the world, an estimated 62 million girls between the ages of 6 and 15 are not in school. The Peace Corps plans to recruit and train at least 650 new volunteers to help remove the barriers to education in developing countries like Albania, Cambodia, Georgia, and Uganda.

The economic payoff can be significant, says Sarah Lynch, a senior director of the global charity Care, which will help train volunteers. "Investments in girls' education have proven to go further than any other spending in global development," she says.

Click the media player above to hear more.

 

Silicon Tally: Where's my tax refund?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-03-20 02:00

It's time for Silicon Tally! How well have you kept up with the week in tech news?

This week, we're joined by David Gura, senior reporter for Marketplace in our Washington D.C. bureau. We're celebrating his last day at Marketplace, as he leaves for Bloomberg TV.

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Starbucks' race push irks some

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-03-20 02:00

Starbucks new #RaceTogether campaign has set off a storm of controversy. The coffee giant is hoping baristas and customers will have a more frank discussion about American race relations. 

So what's the best way to bring up issues of diversity? Nicole Sanchez, CEO of Vaya Consulting, says Starbucks may have helped create controversy by trying to force this conversation when people are at their most vulnerable—that is to say, before they've had their morning coffee.

But Robert Raben, president of the Raben Group, says Starbucks may be onto something. Its coffee houses are so ubiquitous and integrated that they serve as de facto town halls and community centers for places all across the country. 

Freight rail is king in U.S.

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-03-20 02:00

Railways carry more than 40 percent of the freight shipped between U.S. cities. The U.S. freight rail system is uniquely profitable, and it's been attracting international attention. Europe, Russia, Brazil and Australia have all sent representatives here.

“There have been dozens of delegations just over the last couple of years,” says Patricia Reilly, senior vice president  for communications at the Association of American Railroads, a trade group for freight rail companies.

Reilly has met with some of the international visitors. They want to know everything, down to what stone is used for rail beds. Some come with interpreters, but Reilly says they speak a common tongue.

“They might not speak our language, but they love railroads," she says. "They love the sound of a whistle.”

Garrick Francis loves the sound of a whistle, too. He’s a lobbyist with the freight rail company CSX Transportation.  

He’s also met with the international delegations. He says they’re curious about a huge difference between the U.S. and the rest of the world. The American freight rail system is run entirely by private companies. Francis says he gets lots of questions about investment.

“So how do we have private investors," he says. "How is this a business that attracts investment from major funds or major shareholders on Wall Street and in other places?” 

But Francis gets harder questions, too, about rail congestion in places like Chicago. Freight trains have to share track with passenger trains, adding to the congestion. 

The international delegations also want to know about new safety technology freight railways have developed. Freight rail’s safety record has improved, with the accident rate down by 42 percent since 2000. Still, accidents do happen. 

“Some of these accidents with the crude oil trains have been drastic reminders that there’s still a long way to go,” says Pasi Lautala, director of the rail transportation program at Michigan Technological University. 

Lautala says, in some ways, freight rail in the U.S. is a victim of its own success, making money and growing enough to attract admirers from around the world — but still facing expensive challenges.  

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

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