National / International News

PODCAST: It's on me

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-03-30 03:00

We had news this morning from the Commerce Department, reporting the latest economic data on income and spending for the month of February — both rose. More on that. Plus, Northeastern University announces Monday its plan to launch a series of educational hubs embedded directly in select companies across the Bay Area. The Boston college says the program takes a unique hybrid approach—part online, part face-to-face instruction—and aims to draw in more women and minorities to the STEM field. How does it plan to do that? And over the past 50 years, women have made great strides towards equality in the work place. But when it comes to dating, most men still pay for the majority of expenses at the beginning of a relationship. In a day and age where women make as much as or more than men, why are they still not picking up the dinner tab? 

Scottish soldier dies in Florida

BBC - Mon, 2015-03-30 02:59
A Scottish soldier, who was in his 20s and from Edinburgh, has died while on holiday in Florida.

Rights body defended in cake row

BBC - Mon, 2015-03-30 02:59
The role of the Equality Commission in the 'gay cake' case is defended in court.

VIDEO: Nigeria awaits 'tense' election results

BBC - Mon, 2015-03-30 02:56
Nigeria's election body says it expects to announce the first results of Saturday's contested presidential poll on Tuesday.

Bank stress tests cover global slump

BBC - Mon, 2015-03-30 02:52
The UK's banking industry will have to prove it can endure a global economic slump in this year's Bank of England stress tests.

VIDEO: LIVE: Cameron visits Buckingham Palace

BBC - Mon, 2015-03-30 02:50
David Cameron visits Buckingham Palace to hold his final audience with the Queen before the general election.

Teachers call to publish heads' pay

BBC - Mon, 2015-03-30 02:49
The ATL teachers' conference has heard calls for schools to publish details of their pay structure, with warnings of excessive pay rises for top staff.

VIDEO: Overtakes & tattoos at Malaysian GP

BBC - Mon, 2015-03-30 02:42
Watch an alternative take on the weekend's Formula 1 action as Ferrari's Sebastian Vettel beats Mercedes pair Lewis Hamilton and Nico Rosberg to a shock win in Malaysia.

VIDEO: Sollecito: 'Many horrible moments'

BBC - Mon, 2015-03-30 02:41
Raffaele Sollecito has described the last 7 years and 5 months as unbearable, following his acquittal in the Meredith Kercher murder trial.

BBC News website changes for Africa coverage

BBC - Mon, 2015-03-30 02:36
How the BBC News website's coverage of African news is changing

Lib Dems 'won't play footsie on EU'

BBC - Mon, 2015-03-30 02:22
Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg says his party will not "play footsie" with leaving the EU - and says he wants to "serve out the next Parliament".

Vettel win a wake-up call - Wolff

BBC - Mon, 2015-03-30 02:17
Sebastian Vettel's shock Malaysian Grand Prix win on Sunday is a 'wake-up call' for Mercedes, says boss Toto Wolff.

Bank of England puts global recession at heart of doomsday scenario

BBC - Mon, 2015-03-30 02:13
UK banks face stress test against economic collapse in Europe and Asia.

Chile floods death toll rises to 14

BBC - Mon, 2015-03-30 02:09
The number of people killed in flash floods in northern Chile rises to 14 while the search continues for 20 people still missing.

'Tube rescuer' hit by train dies

BBC - Mon, 2015-03-30 02:09
A would-be rescuer, who was hit by a Tube train as he attempted to save another man who had fallen onto the tracks, has died.

Interstellar lands Empire treble

BBC - Mon, 2015-03-30 02:05
Deep space epic Interstellar leaves the competition earthbound at this year's Empire awards, taking off with three prizes including best film.

Hillary's Email Controversy Hasn't Changed Much For 2016

NPR News - Mon, 2015-03-30 02:03

Three weeks after Hillary Clinton's widely covered news conference about her use of private emails as secretary of state, polls continue to show her ahead of Republicans in the 2016 presidential race.

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Northeastern's Silicon Valley campus

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-03-30 02:00

Northeastern University announced on Monday its plan to launch a series of educational hubs embedded directly in select companies in Silicon Valley.

The announcement comes a few months after the Boston-based university opened a branch campus in tech-heavy Seattle.

There is a reason colleges rarely open branches on the opposite side of the country. They tend to be expensive and hard to pull off. But that is not stopping Northeastern.

“When you have people who are in the workforce already, then we don't expect them to come to Boston, we have to go to them,” says University President Joseph Aoun. "People who are in the workplace who want to retool or advance and their knowledge is becoming obsolete." 

Northeastern has partnered with the San Jose company, Integrated Device Technology (IDT), to offer a mixture of long-term internships and classroom instruction.

Scott Jaschik is the editor of Inside Higher Ed. He says it’s still too soon to tell how students will respond.

"We'll either be seeing a lot of people going into the program and coming out and getting good jobs and having their careers advance, or not," says Jaschik.

Jaschik says other schools might offer similar programs at a lower cost but might not have the same industry connections that Northeastern has.

In an age of equality, who should pay for dates?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-03-30 02:00

Over the past 50 years, women have made great strides towards equality in the workplace. But when it comes to dating, most men still pay for the majority of expenses at the beginning of a relationship. In a day and age where women make as much as or more than men, why are they still not picking up the dinner tab?

Porscha Kazmierzak is one of the many women who still think that men should pay on a first date, even though she identifies as a hard core feminist.

“If somebody offers to pay for my meal, I’m thinking this person is considerate and they are maybe going to take care of me,” she says.  “If I insist on paying on a first date, it’s because I’m not interested.”

The tradition of paying for dates is a “short cut to figure out what the other person is thinking," says Rita Seabrook, a PhD student in women's studies and psychology at the University of Michigan.

Seabrook says when a men pays for dinner, it sends clues to the other person such as I like you or I want us to be more than friends. It makes things seem comfortable and certain when dating can feel so uncomfortable and uncertain. So the tradition has stuck around. But so has its other—more subtle—message.

“Men are expected to make a lot of money,” says Seabrook. “And women are expected to value men who make lots of money.”

Evan Major used to think these ideas never really affected him. Then he lost his job at the same time he was dating someone new. When they went out, sometimes he would pay as much as he could. Other times, his girlfriend would cover his half. This challenged his sense of self.

“There is such a tight link between financial security and the identity of a man” he says.

But after the beginning of a relationship, men and women usually start to do things differently.

“Couples start to split somewhere in the first six months” says Dr. David Frederick, a professor of psychology at Chapman University.  

But when it comes to changing gender norms, things move slowly.

“Causing those to change, I think, is a very long process that we’ve seen starting over the past 50 years," says Frederick. 

But Frederick says as long as we continue to see a shift towards more gender equality in the workplace, there’s no reason why we shouldn’t also see the same shift at the dinner table.

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                                             

Northeastern's Silicon Valley campus

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-03-30 02:00

Northeastern University announced on Monday its plan to launch a series of educational hubs embedded directly in select companies in Silicon Valley.

The announcement comes a few months after the Boston-based university opened a branch campus in tech-heavy Seattle.

There is a reason colleges rarely open branches on the opposite side of the country. They tend to be expensive and hard to pull off. But that is not stopping Northeastern.

“When you have people who are in the workforce already, then we don't expect them to come to Boston, we have to go to them,” says University President Joseph Aoun. "People who are in the workplace who want to retool or advance and their knowledge is becoming obsolete." 

Northeastern has partnered with the San Jose company, Integrated Device Technology (IDT), to offer a mixture of long-term internships and classroom instruction.

Scott Jaschik is the editor of Inside Higher Ed. He says it’s still too soon to tell how students will respond.

"We'll either be seeing a lot of people going into the program and coming out and getting good jobs and having their careers advance, or not," says Jaschik.

Jaschik says other schools might offer similar programs at a lower cost but might not have the same industry connections that Northeastern has.

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