National / International News

The Violence In Gaza, Through The Lens Of One Family's Losses

NPR News - Tue, 2014-07-15 14:29

The Gaza Strip has sustained more than 1,500 Israeli airstrikes. A family with no apparent ties to Hamas lost one of two sons last week; the mother and father died in similar attacks six years ago.

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Stroke Rate May Be Declining In Older Adults

NPR News - Tue, 2014-07-15 14:24

Deaths from stroke are dropping too, a study suggests. But don't celebrate just yet. Diabetes, a big risk factor for these "brain attacks," is still on the rise.

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VIDEO: 'Entire families' hit by Afghan bomb

BBC - Tue, 2014-07-15 14:22
At least 42 people have been killed and dozens injured in a suicide attack at a busy market in eastern Afghanistan's Paktika province, local officials say.

Apple and IBM to co-develop apps

BBC - Tue, 2014-07-15 14:16
Apple and IBM - once bitter rivals - announce a tie-up that will see the two firms co-develop business-centric apps for the iPad and iPhone.

KR Reykjavík 0-1 Celtic

BBC - Tue, 2014-07-15 14:11
Callum McGregor scores the only goal to get Celtic boss Ronny Deila's reign off to a winning start against KR Reykjavik.

University Of Texas Can Continue Affirmative Action, Court Rules

NPR News - Tue, 2014-07-15 14:10

In a case sent back by the Supreme Court last year, a federal appellate court ruled Tuesday that the university's use of race as a factor in admissions is acceptable. Plaintiffs have vowed to appeal.

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Utah officials face bribery charges

BBC - Tue, 2014-07-15 14:06
John Swallow and Mark Shurtleff deny accepting cash or campaign contributions from people facing potential scrutiny by the attorney general's office.

At-a-glance: Reshuffle movers

BBC - Tue, 2014-07-15 14:02
David Cameron has reshuffled his ministerial team - here's a guide to the winners, the losers and those taking a sideways move.

VIDEO: Ancient Chinese town under water

BBC - Tue, 2014-07-15 13:59
The ancient Chinese town of Fenghuang has been submerged in water after severe storms battered the region.

Officer 'moved from abuse inquiry'

BBC - Tue, 2014-07-15 13:51
A former senior Metropolitan Police officer says he was moved from his post when he revealed plans to investigate politicians over child abuse claims.

Anderson faces ICC misconduct charge

BBC - Tue, 2014-07-15 13:49
England's James Anderson is charged with misconduct by the ICC after an incident in the first Test against India.

Intel shares rise on strong profit

BBC - Tue, 2014-07-15 13:42
Shares in chip maker Intel rise 4% after the firm reports profits rose 45% in the second quarter to $2.8bn, driven by stronger-than-expected PC sales to businesses.

Superhero Thor recast as a woman

BBC - Tue, 2014-07-15 13:29
Marvel Comics says it is recasting its hammer-wielding Norse superhero Thor as a woman in a bid to attract more women and girls to comic books.

Readers remember India's iconic car

BBC - Tue, 2014-07-15 13:21
Readers remember the Herculean efforts of India's iconic car

Life as a remover

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-07-15 13:19

It takes something very specific to be a remover – the guy who transports a recently deceased body to the funeral parlor. It’s a job that Andrew Meredith describes in his new memoir titled, “The Removers.”

He says his dad, a literature professor and poet who did removals on the side, had the perfect manner for the job.

“He was one of the best at that manner. He was really good at going into a home and making people feel like he was in charge, that everything would be fine, that you’d be hearing from the funeral director in the morning, nothing to worry about, maybe you should go into the kitchen so you don’t see us leave…”

Meredith began his work as a remover after dropping out of college.

“The funeral director would get a call saying so-and-so has died, we need her to be picked up, often at home…so we would get a beep, in 1998, as it were.”

Eventually, Meredith went back to school for his MFA and his working on a novel. But he says he had to write about the experience first.

 “I knew I wouldn’t write about anything worthwhile until I wrote about this.”

Faith school accused of pupil bias

BBC - Tue, 2014-07-15 13:17
A top Catholic state school, attended by Nick Clegg's eldest son, is accused of discrimination and ordered to change its admissions policy.

A Peacock Murder Mystery: (Pea)Fowl Play In California

NPR News - Tue, 2014-07-15 13:16

The boisterous birds are a familiar sight in an upscale community near LA, but in recent years they've become a source of conflict. Now, someone is killing them — 20 in the past six months alone.

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'War cabinet' for election battle

BBC - Tue, 2014-07-15 13:15
Cameron unveils key players in fight for 2015 election

Killing Archie, to keep his brand healthy

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-07-15 13:14

Archie Andrews dies on Wednesday. Not Archie the teenager, who will return in future issues of "Archie Comics" and other titles. This is a grown-up version of Archie in a series called "Life with Archie," featuring stories about Archie as a married adult. Each issue features two versions of Archie's grown-up life — married to Betty in one, Veronica in the other. Both die in issue number 36.  

Killing Archie-the-character fits into a strategy for keeping Archie-the-brand alive and relevant.

Archie gets shot defending his friend Kevin Keller, who is gay, married and running for office.

"It’s not your traditional high-school aged Archie," says Jonathan Goldwater, CEO of Archie Comics Publications. "It’s Archie aged-up just a little bit."

And grown-up Archie is a hit. Goldwater estimates the comic sells more than 75,000 copies an issue — a lot more than an issue of "Archie Comics." Just as important as the narrative tweaks, "Life with Archie" comes in a different size and shape — one that goes on magazine racks in supermarkets and bookstores, not just comic shops.

"Basically, the 32 page comic on the newsstand is going away," says Goldwater.  "And most of the sales now on the traditional comics are in the comic-book shops."

The company's other big hit is "Afterlife with Archie"— in which the gang from Riverdale live through the Zombie Apocalypse. (Jughead, ever the hungriest of the bunch, makes a terrifying zombie.)

 Just as important as the content, "Afterlife with Archie" is published as a series of graphic novels sold in bookstores. The latest issue was the biggest-selling graphic novel for June, according to ComicChron.com, which tracks sales figures.

John Jackson Miller, who runs the site, says fans know better than to take the death of a character seriously.  

He credits longtime comics writer Len Wein with the following maxim:  "No one in comics is ever really dead, unless you can see the body. And usually not even then."

Killing a character is also a time-tested way to grab extra sales. Superman died in 1992, and Captain America died in 2007. Both sold lots of comics, and both came back.

"I appreciate in the publishing world that they need to get some kind of event and sensation to get noticed," says Nick Purpura, co-owner of the store JHU Comics in New York. "You’re not calling me because Archie came out every month— you’re calling me because there’s something happening in Archie."

He hopes people come to his shop to find out more. 

What's a comic book death worth?

Killing off its namesake will likely boost sales for Archie Comics, but high-profile deaths (and resurrections) are common in comic books. So with characters meeting their "end" at every turn, what's a comic book death actually worth? We looked back at some recent deaths that made headlines and how they helped – or hurt – sales.

Superman

(Courtesy:DC Comics)

Perhaps the best-known entry on this list, DC Comic's "Death of Superman" storyline found the Man of Steel fighting an alien rock monster called Doomsday, and the image of him dying in Lois Lane's arms became iconic. Collectors snapped up that issue, which sold millions and made headlines around the world.

Of course, it didn't last. Superman returned – with a black suit and a mullet, because it was the '90s – to fight off impostors and resume his post. Fans labeled Supes' death a gimmick, and the backlash arguably helped push the industry into collapse. You can buy the issue, still sealed in cellophane, on eBay for a few bucks.

Spider-Man

(Courtesy:Marvel Comics)

This one depends on your definition of "death," which is already pretty slippery in comic books. To commemorate the 700th issue of "Amazing Spider-Man," Marvel Comics had the wall-crawler swap brains with his dying nemesis Dr. Octopus. During the ensuing battle, Peter Parker died trapped in Doc Ock's body. The issue sold more than 200,000 copies, according to ComicChron.com, making it one of the best-selling comics of 2012. The $8 price tag probably helped.

The decision to have Doc Ock take on Spider-Man's identity divided fans, but a new series about Octopus' exploits debuted with 188,000 copies sold. "Superior Spider-Man" ran for about a year-and-a-half, selling a solid 70,000 to 80,000 copies per issue before Parker returned to his own body this past spring.

Batman

(Courtesy:DC Comics)

Four years before the Dark Knight met his end (sort of) on movie screens in 2012, Batman was killed off in the comic book storyline "Batman RIP." The final issue, in which Batman seemingly died in a helicopter crash, sold a disappointing 103,000 copies, according to ComicChron.com. Maybe that's because Batman survived, only to be killed in an epic battle during a huge crossover series. That issue only sold a little better, but it was another fake-out; it turns out Batman's charred corpse was that of a clone. The real Batman was unstuck in time and ended up back in the Stone Age... you know what? Never mind.

It's worth noting that the conclusion of "Batman RIP" was beat out by the debut of "Ultimatum," a limited series that brutally killed off dozens of Marvel heroes and villains (not to mention thousands of regular folks) in an alternate universe.

Captain America

(Courtesy:Marvel Comics)

As these things go, Captain America's death in 2007 was downright realistic: following a superhero civil war, sniper downed Cap on the steps of a federal courthouse. In the midst of an economic downturn, seeing America incarnate bleeding to death was a poignant image. "Captain America" issue 25 made headlines and became the top-selling comic of the year with over 290,000 copies sold.

Believe it or not, Capitan America's resurrection involved both time travel and brain-swapping. He was back on the job by 2010. In the meantime, Cap was replaced by former sidekick Bucky Barnes, who was himself killed during World War II and resurrected in 2005.

Got all that?

Corporate inversion: an expensive way to save on taxes

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-07-15 13:14

American drug companies AbbVie and Mylan won’t be American long if all goes as planned. Both are involved in international mergers (worth $53.6 billion and $5.3 billion, respectively) with the ultimate goal of moving their home bases abroad.

It’s a move called an inversion, when companies move headquarters outside of the U.S. to avoid American taxes. And many large American companies are doing it or at least considering it.

“What’s going on now is a feeding frenzy,” says University of California, Berkeley law professor Steven Davidoff Solomon. “Every investment banker now has a slide deck that they’re taking to any possible company and saying, ‘you have to do a corporate inversion now, because if you don’t, your competitors will.’”

The math is simple, but international mergers rarely are. Dealing with legal requirements of a new country can be complex and there are invariably cultural issues to handle. There’s also the potential image hit.

“To shift their profits overseas, to some seems unpatriotic,” says Steve Rosenthal of the Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center. “That’s a real public relations concern.”

Members of Congress are stomping their feet about the current wave of corporate runaways, but partisan gridlock means they’re unlikely to change anything soon. There’s an ongoing debate about how to tax corporations here fairly, but more and more companies are basically exiting that argument, and the country itself.

Mark Garrison: AbbVie is offering $53 billion for Shire. It links up with another company, and in the process saves a bundle on taxes. Arizona State accounting professor Don Goldman says moves like this are especially tempting when competitors do the same.

Don Goldman: It’s kind of a no brainer that if you have a transaction that would allow you to do this, you need to be doing it or you’re gonna get left behind.

Big banks are helping convince companies to move abroad, says Berkeley law professor Steven Davidoff Solomon.

Steven Davidoff Solomon: What’s going on now is a feeding frenzy. Every investment banker now has a slide deck that they’re taking to any possible company and saying you have to do a corporate inversion now, because if you don’t, your competitors will.

The math is simple, but international mergers rarely are. Dealing with legal requirements of a new country can be complex and there are invariably cultural issues to handle. And Steve Rosenthal of the Tax Policy Center points out: companies that do inversions can take a real image hit.

Steve Rosenthal: To shift their profits overseas, to some seems unpatriotic and I think that’s a real public relations concern.

Members of Congress are stomping their feet about the current wave of corporate runaways, but partisan gridlock means they’re unlikely to change anything soon. Mihir Desai is a Harvard Law and Business professor who says it’s no longer a given that companies will be meaningfully part of America, or any country.

Mihir Desai: You can have a financial home in New York, you can have a legal home in a tax haven and your management can sit in London. So that notion that firms are of a country, I think is going away.

There’s an ongoing debate about how to tax corporations here fairly. But more and more companies are basically exiting that argument, and the country itself. In New York, I'm Mark Garrison, for Marketplace.

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