National / International News

VIDEO: Education warnings 'six years ago'

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-24 05:03
Concerns raised earlier this month about a lack of long-term vision for education in Wales were highlighted over six years ago according to a confidential document.

Jobless Claims Bounce Up From Earlier Weeks' Low Levels

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-24 05:03

The 329,000 applications filed last week for unemployment insurance were more than economists expected. One theory: Easter's relatively late date may have skewed the numbers.

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US to propose 'fast lane' net rules

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-24 04:59
New net neutrality rules will be published next month with some saying FCC will end principle of equal traffic for all.

The post-recall GM: What's it look like?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-04-24 04:56

[UPDATED: 8:13AM EDT] General Motors  said this morning that its profit fell 86 percent, its worst quarter since came out of bankruptcy in 2009.  A series of recalls hurt the auto giant, but excluding these one-time items, profits radically beat expectations.

GM is suffering not just from bad weather during the winter months -- but also from bad PR over its handling of faulty ignition switches going back ten years.

The problem has caused at least 13 deaths, and the belated recall -- in February 2014 -- could cost the company $1.3 billion. GM faces ongoing inquiries into its knowledge and handling of the defect, as well as lawsuits from consumers.

Since emerging from bankruptcy at the end of the recession in June 2009, GM has gone from a message of redemption to an acknowledgment of mistakes.

"We will not shirk from our responsibilities now and in the future," new CEO Mary Barra told a Congressional hearing earlier this month about the ignition-switch recall. "Today's GM will do the right thing."

That appears to include heads moving and rolling. Several top executives, in HR, communications and engineering, are out, says Paul Eisenstein of the Detroit Bureau, an auto-industry news service.

"Since the recall we have been seeing more and more changes in mid- to upper-management," says Eisenstein, and he adds that company executives have signaled to expect more of the same.

Meanwhile, GM plans to staff up two new engineering divisions -- one specifically to deal with safety and quality problems.

"The image of the company as a huge lumbering company where management holds back on innovation and change is an image that the company’s going to have to rid itself of very quickly," says Gary Chaison, a professor of industrial relations at Clark University who studies the auto industry. And he says HR shuffles alone aren’t likely to accomplish that goal.

Ecclestone denies bribery in Germany

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-24 04:54
Formula 1 boss Bernie Ecclestone denies charges of bribery at the start of his trial in Munich and says he will fight to clear his name.

Treats in moderation make kids happy

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-24 04:44
Seven-year-olds are happier when they are allowed sweets, snacks and television in moderation, suggests a study of children's well-being.

Labour to cut ties with Co-op Bank

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-24 04:43
The Labour Party is looking to sever its links with the troubled Co-op Bank, bringing to an end one of the oldest political partnerships in the UK.

Stowaway Teen's Father Was Shocked To Hear Son Was In Hawaii

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-24 04:39

The 15-year-old boy hid in the wheel well of a jet that flew Sunday from San Jose, Calif., to Maui. Though temperatures plunged and oxygen was scant, he survived. The father says Allah "saved him."

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AUDIO: Tuition fee savings may be 'small'

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-24 04:26
The savings made by university tuition fee reforms are likely to be "very small," an IFS study has found.

VIDEO: Sarginson finishes stunning team try

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-24 04:23
Dan Sarginson of Wigan Warriors scores the Super League's try of the week in his side's 33-14 win at St Helens.

Cornish granted UK minority status

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-24 04:16
Cornish people are granted minority status under European rules for the protection of national minorities.

Climate change: how to talk about bad news

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-04-24 04:16

It’s been almost eight years since "An Inconvenient Truth," Al Gore’s call-to-action on climate change. Now the televison channel Showtime is taking up the challenge with its nine-part docu-series "Years of Living Dangerously." In between these two films, advocates have learned a lot about communicating climate change. No. 1, it’s harder than anybody thought.

After years of dire warnings, a little over half of Americans worry about climate change “only a little,” if at all, according to a Gallup poll. 

“At first the attitude was, the truth speaks for itself,” says Dan Kahan, a professor of law and psychology at Yale Law School and a member of the Cultural Cognition Project. “Show them the valid science and the people will understand. That’s clearly wrong.”

Ed Maibach, director of George Mason University’s Center for Climate Change Communication, says there are at least three things “we know that you shouldn’t do,” when communicating the science: don't use language people don’t understand, don't use too many numbers, and don't talk about “plants, penguins and polar bears” instead of people. Maibach says another error is talking about the threat of climate change without giving people solutions.

Elke Webber, a business and psychology professor Columbia University’s Earth Institute, takes that one step further. She believes that instead of “scare campaigns” and “visions of apocalyptic futures,” climate advocates need to present visions of what a world less dependent on fossil fuels would look like.

“Focus on the benefits,” Webber says. “Scare campaigns work extremely well when there’s a simple thing you can do to remove the danger. But if it takes protracted action, over time, nobody wants to feel bad for that length of time. People just tune out.”

The real challenge, however, may be to talk about climate change in ways that don’t push people’s cultural and political buttons. Dan Kahan’s research shows that the way people view climate change is closely tied to their values.

People “aggressively filter” information that doesn’t conform to their worldview.

“And remarkably the more proficient somebody is at making sense of empirical data," he says, "the more pronounced this tendency is going to.”

Robert Lalasz, director of science communications at the Nature Conservancy, is convinced that real progress will come at the local level, where people are already confronting drought and rising seas and looking to community leaders for solutions. 

“We need to show people that the people they respect and trust are paying attention to climate science and using it to make decisions about issues they’re dealing with right now and issues in the future,” Lalasz says. Those conversations, however, tend to be about adaptiing to the effects of climate change. The question is whether they can help move the needle on mitigating it, before it's too late.

Day in pictures: 24 April 2014

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-24 04:02
News photos from past 24 hours: 24 April

Caption Challenge: Flower power

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-24 03:57
It's the Caption Challenge. Oh yes it is.

Care needs to 'outstrip' family help

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-24 03:57
The number of older people in England needing care will "outstrip" the number of family members able to provide it by 2017, a think tank warns.

The business of tourist traps

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-04-24 03:52

The iconic New York restaurant Tavern on the Green is reopening Thursday under new ownership after being shut down for years. It has a storied history, but suffered in recent years from a reputation as a tourist trap with dreadful food. The new owners vow to restore it to its old glory and have invested millions in revitalizing the space and the menu.

By Shea Huffman

In light of Tavern on the Green's return, we decided to look at some of the most well-known, or infamous "tourist trap" restaurants around the country. These restaurants may have originally gained noteriety for good food or intriguing historical origins, but have since become better known for their tourist draw.

Top of the World Restaurant - Stratosphere Hotel, Las Vegas

One could argue Las Vegas itself is one big tourist trap, but to pick one restaurant out of all of them, you have to go with the rotating restaurant atop the Stratosphere Hotel, the Top of the World. Like most touristy places to eat, this one banks mostly on the view it offers customers, but doesn't offer the high quality food to match its high price range (it costs $18 just for admission).

Zehnder's of Frankenmuth - Frankenmuth, Michigan

This all-you-can-eat chicken restaurant is somewhat of a landmark in Michigan, known for its massive 1,500 person seating area, making it one of the largest restaurants in the U.S. Zehnder's staff all wear traditional German-style uniforms to match the general style of the restaurant, though the food is decidedly American.

Fisherman's Warf - San Francisco

This is probably one of the most well known tourist traps in the world, and it would be unfair to single out just one of the restaurants that inhabit it for being unremarkable beyond the fact that they are in Fisherman's Warf.

The Billy Goat Taven - Chicago

"Cheezborger! Cheezborger!" The famous line from the Olympia Restaurant skit in Saturday Night Live was inspired by the Greek immigrant owners of the Billy Goat Taven in Chicago. To this day the restaurant is graced with long lines of patrons waiting to hear the staff recite the words, but the general consensus is that it's just typical diner food.

Times Square - New York

Another famous tourist trap whose restaurants we just couldn't single out. If we had to pick one though, it would probably be Guy's American Kitchen & Bar, the restaurant belonging to celebrity chef Guy Fieri, if only for its brilliantly scathing review in the New York Times.

P.O.V. Rooftop Bar at the W Hotel - Washington, D.C.

This lounge, sitting atop the W Hotel in Washington, D.C., offers patrons a great view of the White House and a number of the city's historic monuments, as well as a chance to rub elbows with a few classy politicos. But that might be all it has to offer, as reviewers contend the drinks are overpriced and the food isn't that good.

The Ivy - Los Angeles

Adorned with flowery cottage-style decor, this nouvelle American restaurant sits not far from the talent agency International Creative Management, which has prompted a number of visits from celebrities and pursuing paparazzi. The chance to spot their favorite movie stars drives many tourists to The Ivy, and they pay for it.

The Varsity - Atlanta

The main branch of this burger chain in Atlanta is the largest fast food drive-in in the world, and has become an iconic fixture in the city's culture. The unofficial catchphrase, "What'll ya have?" has become ingrained in Atlanta's folklore, and the restaurant has even been graced with visits from presidents Jimmy Carter, George H. W. Bush, Bill Clinton and Barack Obama. But pretty much everyone who goes there agrees, the food is just "meh."

Wiggins & Froome skip Giro d'Italia

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-24 03:48
Team Sky will be without Britons Sir Bradley Wiggins and Chris Froome for the Giro d'Italia, which starts in Belfast on 9 May.

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal: The Road Show

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-04-24 03:47

To celebrate its 25th year of bringing economics to life, Marketplace® is hitting the road.

On stages across the U.S., "How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Numbers" will provide an irreverent, insightful look at the numbers in our lives. Numbers in headlines, numbers without context. From the Dow to the NASDAQ to weekly unemployment, we're bombarded with newsworthy numbers every day, how do we make sense of what they all really mean?

Join Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal — plus reporters Adriene Hill, Stacey Vanek Smith, Lizzie O'Leary, Rob Schmitz and Paddy Hirsch — as they humanize the numbers. It's an evening of radio, with sound elements, interviews and engaging storytelling.

What Marketplace does best, but in person, on stage, at the Strathmore.

April 24, 2014
7:00pm

To purchase tickets visit: http://www.strathmore.org/eventstickets/calendar/view.asp?id=10819

Limited number of half-price tickets available from Goldstar.

London Grammar vie for top Novello

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-24 03:41
London Grammar, John Newman and Palma Violets are in the running for this year's prestigious Ivor Novello songwriting award.

Sharing is caring: a collaborative commons economy

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-04-24 03:39

Airbnb has had an up-and-down couple of days. On Friday, investors put an additional $500 million into the company, valuing it at roughly $10 billion. This week, they're in a New York courtroom, defending their model against a subpoena for their list of New York hosts. Hotel regulators argue that the company violates New York law that an apartment cannot be rented for less than 30 days.

Jeremy Rifkin, author of "The Zero Marginal Cost Society," thinks the way Airbnb operates is a sign of a shift in how business will be done in the future. The conflict comes down to the elimination of marginal costs. That's the term for how much it costs for a business to add an additional good or service. According to Rifkin, Airbnb's marginal costs are almost nothing, and that's problematic for brick-and-mortar businesses.

"Businesses have always wanted to reduce marginal costs. They simply never anticipated a tech revolution so extreme in its productivity that it could reduce marginal costs to near zero, making goods and services nearly free, abundant, and sometimes not prone to market exchange forces."

Rifkin also points out that this struggle between Airbnb and hotel regulators is different than, say, what the music industry went through when users tried to share content for free. In that case, the market had to adjust and learn to coexist with new technologies. Sharing economies, however, may have larger implications with how bussinesses operate. According to Rifkin:

"The capitalist market will stay. It will have a role to play. I don't think it'll be the primary arbiter of economic life in 30 years from now. I think the collaborative commons is here to stay."

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