National / International News

Looking for a job? How new tech is helping companies find potential employees

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-01-20 11:19

Technology is making all kinds of choices for us these days, like how Netflix and Pandora can use big data to tell us which movies and music we might like. Now, it’s changing the way job seekers and employers connect.  Case in point: 21-year-old Isaiah Bien Amie, a Boston College senior who’s on track to graduate this spring with a major economics. 

He wants to get an MBA, but first he needs a job, so Bien Amie signed on with AfterCollege.com. The free website sends college students and recent grads curated alerts with job and internship postings based on where and what they study. 

It also allows employers to contact students directly. Bien Amie signed up a month ago and says he’s already had two interviews. 

“I think they are capable of getting a sense of who I am as a person and tailoring my search to make sure that the jobs that they are posting are intriguing to me,” Bien Amie says.

The matchmaker at AfterCollege is a bunch of math; the website started in 1999 as a searchable job board and it’s kept track of who applied for what. Last year, the company fed all that data through an algorithm and started recommending jobs.

“You have basically a reduced likelihood that you’re going to end up in a job you don’t like, or that you’re going to become a worker that the employer doesn’t like,” says CEO Roberto Angulo.

AfterCollege is one of a growing number of companies that are developing high-tech tools for the job market. As the economy recovers millions of people still need jobs, and hiring methods are outdated, according to Rosemary Haefner, Vice President of Human Relations at CareerBuilder.com. “You send in a piece of paper, whether it’s through a job board and it’s electronic or hard copy, and it’s, ‘here’s my life story, please recruiter read it.’”  She compares the interview process to going on a few dates, then getting married.  “What these products that are coming into the marketplace are really saying, is that there are so many more important parts to figuring if it’s a match.”

A new company called Knack makes video games employers can use to analyze job applicants’ personalities and talents. In one game dubbed “Wasabi Waiter” you play a server in a busy sushi bar who has to multitask to keep customers happy.

“From that they can infer all sorts of characteristics about you like your perseverance and your creativity, even your extroversion,” says Erik Brynjolfsson, a Knack adviser and Director of MIT’s Center for Digital Business.  “Those are things that don’t show up on your resume or your college transcript.”

Brynjolfsson says using big data to connect more companies with the right talent could have trillions of dollars in economic value. “Doing matchmaking for people’s careers and for the efficiency of companies and ultimately for the whole economy, that’s big money, and that’s something that’s going to hopefully lead to more fulfilling careers for a lot of people.”

He compares the way technology is opening up how companies work to what the microscope did for the study of biology. In the future, the future he believes more hiring decisions will be based on hard data, instead of software and gut reactions.

Looking for a job? How new tech is helping

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-01-20 11:19

Technology is making all kinds of choices for us these days, like how Netflix and Pandora can use big data to tell us which movies and music we might like. Now, it’s changing the way job seekers and employers connect.  Case in point: 21-year-old Isaiah Bien Amie, a Boston College senior who’s on track to graduate this spring with a major economics. 

He wants to get an MBA, but first he needs a job, so Bien Amie signed on with AfterCollege.com. The free website sends college students and recent grads curated alerts with job and internship postings based on where and what they study. 

It also allows employers to contact students directly. Bien Amie signed up a month ago and says he’s already had two interviews. 

“I think they are capable of getting a sense of who I am as a person and tailoring my search to make sure that the jobs that they are posting are intriguing to me,” Bien Amie says.

The matchmaker at AfterCollege is a bunch of math; the website started in 1999 as a searchable job board and it’s kept track of who applied for what. Last year, the company fed all that data through an algorithm and started recommending jobs.

“You have basically a reduced likelihood that you’re going to end up in a job you don’t like, or that you’re going to become a worker that the employer doesn’t like,” says CEO Roberto Angulo.

AfterCollege is one of a growing number of companies that are developing high-tech tools for the job market. As the economy recovers millions of people still need jobs, and hiring methods are outdated, according to Rosemary Haefner, Vice President of Human Relations at CareerBuilder.com. “You send in a piece of paper, whether it’s through a job board and it’s electronic or hard copy, and it’s, ‘here’s my life story, please recruiter read it.’”  She compares the interview process to going on a few dates, then getting married.  “What these products that are coming into the marketplace are really saying, is that there are so many more important parts to figuring if it’s a match.”

A new company called Knack makes video games employers can use to analyze job applicants’ personalities and talents. In one game dubbed “Wasabi Waiter” you play a server in a busy sushi bar who has to multitask to keep customers happy.

“From that they can infer all sorts of characteristics about you like your perseverance and your creativity, even your extroversion,” says Erik Brynjolfsson, a Knack adviser and Director of MIT’s Center for Digital Business.  “Those are things that don’t show up on your resume or your college transcript.”

Brynjolfsson says using big data to connect more companies with the right talent could have trillions of dollars in economic value. “Doing matchmaking for people’s careers and for the efficiency of companies and ultimately for the whole economy, that’s big money, and that’s something that’s going to hopefully lead to more fulfilling careers for a lot of people.”

He compares the way technology is opening up how companies work to what the microscope did for the study of biology. In the future, the future he believes more hiring decisions will be based on hard data, instead of software and gut reactions.

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BBC - Mon, 2014-01-20 10:46
The European Space Agency's comet-chasing spacecraft, Rosetta, has woken from hibernation.

VIDEO: Inside the Met’s elite firearms unit

BBC - Mon, 2014-01-20 10:28
The Metropolitan Police says it was wrong not to formally review the "hard stop" tactic six years before it was used in the Mark Duggan shooting.

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BBC - Mon, 2014-01-20 10:25
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BBC - Mon, 2014-01-20 10:23
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BBC - Mon, 2014-01-20 10:19
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BBC - Mon, 2014-01-20 10:18
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BBC - Mon, 2014-01-20 10:14
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Police plebgate apology to Mitchell

BBC - Mon, 2014-01-20 10:07
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BBC - Mon, 2014-01-20 09:58
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Mexico forces in drug cartel arrests

BBC - Mon, 2014-01-20 09:54
A Knights Templar drug cartel leader is among 38 people arrested by Mexican troops in a bid to restore order in Michoacan state, officials say.

N.J. Lt. Gov. Denies Strong-Arming Mayor Over Sandy Relief Funds

NPR News - Mon, 2014-01-20 09:54

Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno calls the accusation by Hoboken Mayor Dawn Zimmer "false" and "illogical." The latest flap comes as Gov. Chris Christie's administration is embroiled in a scandal over the politically motivated closure of bridge lanes.

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Man jailed in N Korea appeals to US

BBC - Mon, 2014-01-20 09:44
Kenneth Bae, an American citizen held in North Korea, speaks to foreign media and calls for US "cooperation" to secure his release.

One of three cleared in slavery case

BBC - Mon, 2014-01-20 09:33
A man charged with his brother and father over slavery offences at a farm near Newport is found not guilty on a judge's order.

Iran curbs uranium enrichment

BBC - Mon, 2014-01-20 09:30
Iran begins restricting uranium enrichment under a nuclear deal with world powers which respond by suspending some economic sanctions.

Spoof UKIP Twitter tops 80K followers

BBC - Mon, 2014-01-20 09:18
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Mother charged with son's murder

BBC - Mon, 2014-01-20 09:15
Rosdeep Kular, mother of three-year-old Mikaeel Kular, appears in court in Edinburgh charged with his murder.

At least 26 die in Baghdad blasts

BBC - Mon, 2014-01-20 09:14
Police and medics say at least 26 people have been killed in a series of bomb blasts in Baghdad, in the latest in an extended surge of violence.

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