National / International News

Libel bill may cost blogger her home

BBC - Fri, 2015-01-16 11:25
A blogger is facing the prospect of having to sell her home after the deadline to pay libel damages to the chief executive of Carmarthenshire council passed.

Snowfall ends Rangers-Hearts game

BBC - Fri, 2015-01-16 11:22
The Championship match between Rangers and Hearts at Ibrox is abandoned at 0-0 after 25 minutes due to snow on the pitch.

Major health care player gets ready to retire

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-01-16 11:09

The most important person in health care you've never heard of said Friday she plans to retire next month. Marilyn Tavenner runs the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and oversees those two giant health care programs. What makes her job so important? To borrow a phrase from E.F. Hutton – when CMS talks, people listen. Why? 

The usual: money and power.

What DeSean Jackson Taught Us About Economic Mobility

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-01-16 11:08

Last year, the Philadelphia Eagles cut their star player DeSean Jackson over concerns that he still had ties to violent gangs in the Los Angeles neighborhood where he grew up. The incident highlighted the complicated connection between neighborhood, wealth, income, and the economic gaps that many people from poor neighborhoods can fall into when things go bad -- even after they've "made it." We revisit what the Jackson incident taught us, and talk to Jamelle Bouie of Slate, who writes about the connection between neighborhood, housing, race, and economic mobility.

Missing eagle Norman has landed

BBC - Fri, 2015-01-16 11:04
A golden eagle that escaped from a Bedfordshire falconer is found.

Your Wallet: Leaps

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-01-16 10:52

We're exploring leaps in our economy, and in our lives. We want to know, did you ever collect yourself and go for it?

Maybe buy that house? Get married?

Or jump into a big new financial commitment ...

We want to hear the dramatic stories of your leap. How did you land?

 

Itinerant bees have an important role in economy

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-01-16 10:36

Most gaps, whether they're global or personal, are pretty easy to see, or visualize. But there's a major economic gap in agriculture that's invisible, for now. And that's because it's being filled. By bees. 

Without bees, we'd lose more than honey.... We'd lose billions of dollars from our economy – $15 billion each year in the U.S. alone and $100 billion globally.

And we might taste the gap, too: Without bees, our plates would be a lot less colorful. Bees are crucial to the farming of fruits and vegetables, as well as grains, and meat (which relies on cattle fed on alfalfa, which depends on bees).

We spoke with Noah Wilson-Rich, founder of urban beekeeping business The Best Bees Company, about how to keep bees happy, healthy and productive in our economy.

He's trying to change the way most bees live now, which is a little bit like long-haul truckers.

About half of all honey bees in the United States live on flatbed trucks, in rest stops or on planes. They travel from crop to crop, pollinating flowers and collecting nectar for their own food throughout the year.

Bee travel is a function of monoculture crops: because there isn't enough food for bees in any one place, they move between agricultural hot spots. Bees pollinate almond blossoms in California, blueberries in Maine and then move on to cranberries, apples, oranges, lemons, traveling the country.

Wilson-Rich focuses on urban beekeeping as a way to keep bees healthy and stop all the travel. Bees, like most creatures, are healthier when they eat a varied diet. And recently, research has shown that bees produce more honey in urban settings than rural ones. 

Companies like The Best Bee Company integrate hives into cities, attaching them to homes, apartments, businesses and schools. 

As humans live more harmoniously alongside bees, Wilson-Rich says, the bee population will continue to increase, reaching levels that existed before colony collapse disorder depleted their number in 2006. 

To hear more about the bee economy, listen to the interview in the player above. 

Itinerant bees play an important role in economy

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-01-16 10:36

Most gaps, whether they're global or personal, are pretty easy to see, or visualize. But there's a major economic gap in agriculture that's invisible, for now. And that's because it's being filled. By bees. 

Without bees, we'd lose more than honey.... We'd lose billions of dollars from our economy – $15 billion each year in the U.S. alone and $100 billion globally.

And we might taste the gap, too: Without bees, our plates would be a lot less colorful. Bees are crucial to the farming of fruits and vegetables, as well as grains, and meat (which relies on cattle fed on alfalfa, which depends on bees).

We spoke with Noah Wilson-Rich, founder of urban beekeeping business The Best Bees Company, about how to keep bees happy, healthy and productive in our economy.

He's trying to change the way most bees live now, which is a little bit like long-haul truckers.

About half of all honey bees in the United States live on flatbed trucks, in rest stops or on planes. They travel from crop to crop, pollinating flowers and collecting nectar for their own food throughout the year.

Bee travel is a function of monoculture crops: because there isn't enough food for bees in any one place, they move between agricultural hot spots. Bees pollinate almond blossoms in California, blueberries in Maine and then move on to cranberries, apples, oranges, lemons, traveling the country.

Wilson-Rich focuses on urban beekeeping as a way to keep bees healthy and stop all the travel. Bees, like most creatures, are healthier when they eat a varied diet. And recently, research has shown that bees produce more honey in urban settings than rural ones. 

Companies like The Best Bee Company integrate hives into cities, attaching them to homes, apartments, businesses and schools. 

As humans live more harmoniously alongside bees, Wilson-Rich says, the bee population will continue to increase, reaching levels that existed before colony collapse disorder depleted their number in 2006. 

To hear more about the bee economy, listen to the interview in the player above. 

The bee economy

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-01-16 10:36

Most gaps, whether they're global or personal, are pretty easy to see, or visualize. But there's a major economic gap in agriculture that's invisible, for now. And that's because it's being filled. By bees. 

 

Without bees, we'd lose more than honey.... We'd lose billions of dollars from our economy – $15 billion each year in the U.S. alone and $100 billion globally. 

 

And we might taste the gap, too: Without bees, our plates would be a lot less colorful. Bees are crucial to the farming of fruits and vegetables, as well as grains, and meat (which relies on cattle fed on alfalfa, which depends on bees).

 

We spoke with Noah Wilson-Rich, founder of urban beekeeping business The Best Bees Company, about how to keep bees happy, healthy and productive in our economy. 

 

He's trying to change the way most bees live now, which is a little bit like long-haul truckers.

 

About half of all honey bees in the United States live on flatbed trucks, in rest stops or on planes. They travel from crop to crop, pollinating flowers and collecting nectar for their own food throughout the year. 

 

Bee travel is a function of monoculture crops: because there isn't enough food for bees in any one place, they move between agricultural hot spots. Bees pollinate almond blossoms in California, blueberries in Maine and then move on to cranberries, apples, oranges, lemons, traveling the country. 

 

Wilson-Rich focuses on urban beekeeping as a way to keep bees healthy and stop all the travel. Bees, like most creatures, are healthier when they eat a varied diet. And recently, research has shown that bees produce more honey in urban settings than rural ones. 

 

Companies like The Best Bee Company integrate hives into cities, attaching them to homes, apartments, businesses and schools. 

 

As humans live more harmoniously alongside bees, Wilson-Rich says, the bee population will continue to increase, reaching levels that existed before colony collapse disorder depleted their number in 2006. 

 

To hear more about the bee economy, listen to the interview in the player above. 

Fla. Police Department Used Black Mug Shots For Target Practice

NPR News - Fri, 2015-01-16 10:35

The practice was discovered when a National Guard sergeant found that one of the mug shots was her brother's. The North Miami Beach police chief says pictures of whites and Hispanics are also used.

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Jailed ex-marine's debate postponed

BBC - Fri, 2015-01-16 10:33
A debate on a former Royal Marine's murder conviction for killing an Afghan insurgent is postponed at the request of his family.

VIDEO: Ebola orphans cast out by communities

BBC - Fri, 2015-01-16 10:21
Many children orphaned by Ebola are being shunned by their communities over fears they may bring the disease back with them.

Body found in murder probe search

BBC - Fri, 2015-01-16 10:19
Detectives investigating the suspected murder of a Cardiff woman find a body on an allotment.

What exists between desire and fulfillment?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-01-16 10:19

Instant gratification is the norm in today's economy. Online shopping, instant downloads, and increasingly-speedy delivery times all contribute to a want it now, get it now mentality that drives our spending and consumption. 

But what happens if you wait for something? According to Elizabeth Dunn, a professor of psychology at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, you might enjoy it more. 

A 2010 study in the Netherlands found that people surveyed before a vacation were happier than those surveyed right after a vacation, and even people on vacation. In that period of anticipation, waiting for the trip, people could imagine a perfect ideal, something that would likely not exist in reality. 

This kind of thinking inspires Pinterest boards of dream weddings, makes watching French TV shows and listening to Edith Piaf before a trip to Paris exciting. 

Dunn says that the period of anticipation while waiting for an experience is a form of free enjoyment -- a chance to maximize the time spent appreciating something you've already paid for. 

The same goes for smaller purchases -- new clothes, a visit to a restaurant -- and big financial hurdles. Dunn says that the same principles that allow people to enjoy the time before a vacation could be applied to a college savings account, or a retirement fund.

The key, Dunn says, is to make things more concrete: the details matter.  

Police commander sacked over 'leak'

BBC - Fri, 2015-01-16 10:17
A police borough commander is sacked by a disciplinary panel for giving details of a "sensitive" police investigation to a journalist.

Can A New Ban On Witchcraft Protect The Albinos Of Tanzania?

NPR News - Fri, 2015-01-16 10:12

Media reports this week said the Tanzanian government was going to go after "witch doctors" who attack albinos. But what, exactly, is a "witch doctor"? And why are they targeting people with albinism?

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One dreaded question: What do you do?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-01-16 10:07

Throughout the recession a lot of Americans had work histories filled with gaps.

Bill Marshall is having one now.

It began this July when he was laid off from his job at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. 

Marshall speaks to Marketplace Weekend from his home in Devon, Pennsylvania. 

He's says learned a lot from his gap, but he starts with one dreaded question.

 

Teenager in terror arrest at airport

BBC - Fri, 2015-01-16 10:07
A teenager is arrested by counter-terrorism officers as she arrives on a flight at Stansted Airport.

VIDEO: What today's Wild West is really like

BBC - Fri, 2015-01-16 09:52
The modern story of America's Wild West

Obama: There's A Less Than 50/50 Chance Of Nuclear Deal With Iran

NPR News - Fri, 2015-01-16 09:52

In a joint press conference with British Prime Minister David Cameron, President Obama also urged Congress to keep out of the negotiations with Iran.

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