National / International News

After The Waves, Staten Island Homeowner Takes Sandy Buyout

NPR News - Wed, 2014-10-29 14:03

Staten Islander Stephen Drimalas barely survived Hurricane Sandy. Now he and several Staten Islanders will sell their oceanfront homes to the state, which hopes to get people out of flood-prone areas.

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Pietersen claims sadden England pair

BBC - Wed, 2014-10-29 14:00
England bowlers Stuart Broad and James Anderson say they are saddened by Kevin Pietersen's claims of a bullying culture.

Decoding The Food And Drink On A Day Of The Dead Altar

NPR News - Wed, 2014-10-29 14:00

The Mexican tradition celebrates the dead and welcomes their return to the land of the living once a year. Enticing them to make the trip is where the food, drink and musical offerings come in.

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VIDEO: Newly-lit Sistine Chapel is unveiled

BBC - Wed, 2014-10-29 13:56
The Vatican has unveiled a new hi-tech LED lighting system for the Sistine Chapel in Rome.

Wales' £2bn EU deal formally agreed

BBC - Wed, 2014-10-29 13:48
A deal for Wales to receive £2bn in European aid between 2014 and 2020 has been formally agreed.

MP Jim Murphy joins Labour contest

BBC - Wed, 2014-10-29 13:42
Jim Murphy says he is seeking a "fresh start for Scotland and the Labour Party" as he confirms he will stand for leadership of the party in Scotland.

To Tackle Sexual Assault Cases, Colleges Enlist Investigators-For-Hire

NPR News - Wed, 2014-10-29 13:41

Colleges are under pressure to revamp how they handle sexual assault cases. Some schools, rather than trying to train administrators to act like prosecutors, are outsourcing the job to real ones.

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Celtic 6-0 Partick Thistle

BBC - Wed, 2014-10-29 13:32
John Guidetti scores a hat-trick as Celtic thrash Partick Thistle in the Scottish League Cup quarter-finals.

RAF jets intercept cargo plane

BBC - Wed, 2014-10-29 13:30
Two RAF jets create a sonic boom as they intercept a Latvian cargo plane over Kent and accompany it to Stansted Airport.

No Ebola, S'il Vous Plait, We're French: The Ivory Coast Mindset

NPR News - Wed, 2014-10-29 13:23

The country borders Liberia and Guinea, but so far Ebola hasn't arrived. Maybe it's because of the French heritage. When the authorities tell people what to do to keep the virus out, they listen.

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Bradford family 'stabbed to death'

BBC - Wed, 2014-10-29 12:43
Three members of Bradford family found dead at their home were stabbed to death and a fourth died from hanging, post-mortem tests reveal.

Ebola cases 'slowing in Liberia'

BBC - Wed, 2014-10-29 12:40
The WHO says Liberia, the country hardest hit in the Ebola outbreak, has seen a decline in infections, but warns the crisis is far from over.

Monsanto Hired This Guy To Help It Win Over Millennials

NPR News - Wed, 2014-10-29 12:39

Vance Crowe, 32, has a tough assignment: reach out to millennials, many of whom are skeptical of GMOs. Crowe says the company can do a better job of listening to their concerns.

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Russia 'steps up' military flights

BBC - Wed, 2014-10-29 12:33
Nato reports an "unusual" increase in Russian military aircraft conducting manoeuvres over European airspace over the last two days.

Australia's flexible small firms

BBC - Wed, 2014-10-29 12:19
The Aussie firms offering unusual job perks and flexible working

Campuses Play Host To Tanning Beds, Despite Skin Cancer Risk

NPR News - Wed, 2014-10-29 12:06

The links between tanning beds and skin cancer are well known, but a survey of the top colleges and universities in the U.S. shows that many allow tanning beds on campus.

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VIDEO: The Chinese succession dilemma

BBC - Wed, 2014-10-29 12:04
The Chinese approach to succession in family firms is changing - the BBC looks at why.

US envoy talks with parties begin

BBC - Wed, 2014-10-29 12:04
Former US senator Gary Hart commences meetings with Northern Ireland politicians.

TV: Reports of my death have been greatly exaggerated

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-10-29 12:00

Seems like every election, some political analyst says the end is near for political ads on TV – that TV is dead. Well not this year. Candidates in the midterm elections are blasting voters with TV commercials.

Evan Tracey is on the front lines of the political ad wars. He's senior vice president at National Media Research, Planning and Placement, a Republican consulting firm, which offers candidates advice, makes TV ads and places them. What does he tell campaigns? Buy as much TV advertising time as you can. 

“If the predictions of TV being dead are true then it’s being buried in money,” he says.

Tracey says, sure TV audiences are aging, but older people vote. And TV ads can work with online ads to catch younger voters, who watch TV with smartphones in hand.

“So if I can have my voice and pictures on your TV screen and have my digital ad on your smartphone, I’ve gotten you two ways now,” he says.

Plus TV can be targeted more than ever now.  Cable set top boxes tell campaigns exactly what you’re watching. They figure out what your favorite shows are, and advertise on them. But Tracey says it’s still best to use TV as an old fashioned megaphone -- blanketing the airwaves, till there’s no escape.

“Some of these states right now – you know -  they’re seeing thousands of ads a day,” he says.

States like Iowa.  

 “It’s been really hard to watch TV without being bombarded with advertisements,” says Barbara Trish, professor of political science at Grinnell College in Iowa.

But Trish doesn’t mind the ads.  She loves them, even studies them at Grinnell. One of her favorites features a candidate who compares castrating hogs to cutting pork in Washington.

Trish agrees that TV is still king of campaign ads, but for a different reason. Candidates, parties and outside groups are pouring cash into the midterm election, and it needs a home.

“It’s just that there’s so much money out there," she says.  "It seems like, they feel like it has to be spent on something.  You’ve got to put it to use.”

There’s a lot of money sloshing around Colorado, too, where there are close Senate and gubernatorial races.  And lots of ads, focused on women’s issues and big government.

Floyd Ciruli is a pollster in Denver and the head of Ciruli Associates. He’s getting sick of all the ads; in fact, he’s been predicting the dethroning of TV since the early 2000s. Banging the drum about how candidates will go digital, and look for other ways to reach voters.  

But even he admits, when it comes to TV, "It’s still the king.”

Ciruli says blanket TV advertising can gain a campaign a few points in the polls. That could push a candidate over the top in Colorado.

“It’s going to be close," he says. "So a couple of percentage points can make the difference.”

Ciruli says TV’s crown will start to slip, eventually. But it’s firmly in place, for the foreseeable future. 

 

 

 

Scientists Implicate More Than 100 Genes In Causing Autism

NPR News - Wed, 2014-10-29 11:35

Spontaneous gene mutations, not ones inherited from parents, increase a child's risk of autism, scientists say. By comparing genes within families they've identified more than 100 suspects.

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