National / International News

Jeb Bush Continues To Test Campaign Waters With Detroit Speech

NPR News - Wed, 2015-02-04 12:36

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush isn't an official candidate for president yet. But his speech to the Detroit Economic Club is being closely watched.

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As Jets Roar Overhead, Jordan Remembers Its Fallen Pilot

NPR News - Wed, 2015-02-04 12:32

Many Jordanians opposed joining the U.S.-led coalition against ISIS. But at a funeral ceremony for the country's fallen pilot, mourners honored his sacrifice and called for the destruction of ISIS.

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Would You Eat At A Restaurant That Skipped The Hand-Washing?

NPR News - Wed, 2015-02-04 12:28

Apparently, making restaurant workers wash their hands before exiting the bathroom is a sign of regulation gone overboard. At least that's what Republican Sen. Thom Tillis suggested on Monday.

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Hospitals Fail To Protect Nursing Staff From Becoming Patients

NPR News - Wed, 2015-02-04 12:27

Nursing employees suffer 35,000 back and other injuries nearly every year. But many career-ending injuries could be prevented if hospitals brought in new technology and taught "safe patient handling."

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Does Facebook Cause Depression? Depends On How You Use It

NPR News - Wed, 2015-02-04 12:24

Those great photos from your high school girlfriend's recent vacation in the Caribbean? A study says they're probably making you envious, and that envy could be contributing to feelings of depression.

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Argentina's President, During Visit To China, Mocks Chinese Speech In Tweet

NPR News - Wed, 2015-02-04 12:22

President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner appeared to suggest the Chinese have trouble pronouncing their R's and L's – using the words "rice," "petroleum" and "Campora" as examples.

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Boko Haram 'kill 70 in Cameroon'

BBC - Wed, 2015-02-04 12:08
Boko Haram militants have reportedly killed at least 70 people in an attack on a Cameroonian town near the Nigerian border.

Insurers often take sting out of high price of drugs

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2015-02-04 12:05

California-based bio-pharmaceutical company Gilead Sciences released strong quarterly earnings Tuesday – revenues more than doubled from a year earlier and profits beat analysts’ estimates. Then, on Wednesday, the company’s stock fell more than 8 percent on the Nasdaq exchange.

The stock decline is pegged to Gilead’s telling investors that the company will offer deeper discounts in 2015 than it did last year on its most successful new drugs – Sovaldi and Harvoni – that are highly effective treatments for hepatitis C. The list price for an eight-to-12-week course of treatment with either drug ranges from $84,000 to well over $100,000.

Discounts being negotiated by health insurance companies and pharmacy benefit managers will double to 46 percent in 2015, according to the company, while discounts for Medicaid and Veterans Administration programs are expected to be above 50 percent.

These new drugs are very costly to research and test, and have an astronomical list price, says Dr. Kavita Patel, who treats patients with hepatitis  C and researches drug pricing at the Brookings Institution. But “what is advertised as the ‘sticker price’ is not what anybody really pays if you have private health insurance,” she says.

Large insurers are likely to get the best deals on these drugs and pass at least some of the savings on to their customers, she says. Many patients in those plans will only pay up to a specific limit for the drugs, and then their health plan – whether private or government-run – will pick up the rest, according to Patel. Some patients may still face very high drug costs, or hurdles other than cost, to get the drugs – including multiple screenings, approvals and delays from their health plans, she says.

Health economist Gail Wilensky, a senior fellow at Project HOPE and an administrator of Medicare and Medicaid in the early 1990s, says the market is working properly in this case to allow prices for specialty drugs to fluctuate as competitors bring new hepatitis C drugs to market. Gilead and other pharmaceutical companies try to recoup as much of their development costs as they can in the window of time before they face serious competition from rival drugs, she says.

Gilead is facing that competition. And she says charges of overpricing in this case may be unjustified. Wilensky says she believes Gilead initially set its pricing so high not only to recoup drug development costs for hepatitis C and other research, but also because successful treatment with Sovaldi and Harvoni can dramatically decrease the long-term cost of hepatitis treatment and drugs, since in many cases it cures what has been until now a devastating chronic condition.

How The Voting Debates Will Be Different In 2015

NPR News - Wed, 2015-02-04 11:55

There are already 1,200 voting bills introduced in state legislatures this year. Many seek to expand early voting, online and mail voting.

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25 men face child sex charges

BBC - Wed, 2015-02-04 11:54
West Yorkshire Police charge 25 men with child sex offences including rape, grooming and trafficking.

DR Congo 1-3 Ivory Coast

BBC - Wed, 2015-02-04 11:53
Ivory Coast make it into their third Africa Cup of Nations final in nine years after proving too strong for DR Congo.

9/11 plotter accuses Saudi royals

BBC - Wed, 2015-02-04 11:47
Convicted al-Qaeda plotter Zacarias Moussaoui has claimed members of the Saudi royal family helped fund the 9/11 attacks.

Most People Getting Measles Are Adults. Time For A Shot?

NPR News - Wed, 2015-02-04 11:10

Though much of the emphasis in this measles outbreak has been on children, most of the people getting sick are adults. That has more than a few grownups wondering if they're vulnerable.

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VIDEO: 'Biggest year for England Rugby'

BBC - Wed, 2015-02-04 11:04
Stuart Lancaster tells BBC Sports Editor Dan Roan that this is the biggest year ever for rugby union in England.

Why Staples may be allowed to buy Office Depot

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2015-02-04 11:03

On Wednesday, Staples announced it had entered into an agreement to purchase Office Depot for $6.3 billion in cash and stock. The merger came after a concerted effort by activist hedge fund Starboard Value. But it also came nearly two decades after a previous attempt to combine the two companies. That effort was foiled by antitrust issues, but this time the outcome may be different. 

In the 1990s, the Federal Trade Commission decided that a merger between Office Depot and Staples would result in higher prices for consumers, according to Michael Keeley, an antitrust lawyer with Axinn Veltrop & Harkrider.

The rise of big-box stores and online retailers like Amazon have since changed the competitive landscape, says Robert Salomon, an associate professor of management and organizations at NYU's Stern School of Business.

Chris Christopher, an economist in charge of consumer markets at IHS Global Insight, says office supply and stationary retailer sales have been declining since 2008, and are expected to contract from $17.1 billion in 2014 to $15.9 billion in 2015 — a decline of 7 percent.

Keeley expects that Staples and Office Depot will argue that the changed competitive environment means a merger no longer allows them to control prices, but is simply about survival in a declining market. But FTC approval is never certain.

A brief history of Staples trying to buy Office Depot

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2015-02-04 11:03

On Wednesday, Staples announced it had entered into an agreement to purchase Office Depot for $6.3 billion in cash and stock. The merger came after a concerted effort by activist hedge fund Starboard Value. But it also came nearly two decades after a previous attempt to combine the two companies. That effort was foiled by antitrust issues, but this time the outcome may be different. 

Michael Keeley, an antitrust lawyer at Axinn Veltrop & Harkrider, says back in the 1990s, the FTC found Office Depot and Staples were setting their prices based on each other, and found a merger would result in higher prices for consumers. 

Robert Salomon, associate professor of management and organizations at NYU's Stern School of Business, says the years since have changed the competitive landscape, with the rise of big box stores and online retailers like Amazon. 

Chris Christopher, economist in charge of consumer markets at IHS Global Insight, says office supply and stationary retailer sales have been declining since 2008, and are expected to contract from $17.1 billion in 2014 to $15.9 billion in 2015 — a decline of 7 percent.

Keeley expects the companies to argue that the changed competitive environment means a merger no longer allows them to control prices, but is simply about survival in a declining market. But FTC approval is never certain.

Pent-up demand happily collides with new car models

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2015-02-04 11:00

Sales of new cars and trucks got off to a brisk start in January.  Low gas prices coupled with a resurgent U.S. economy are driving sales, particularly of high-end SUVs and pickup trucks. The world’s best-selling carmaker, Toyota, raised its fiscal-year forecast to a record high Wednesday, thanks to a weaker yen and strong U.S. sales.

The domestic auto market has been surging for some time. Nearly every carmaker selling in the U.S. has seen good things happen to its bottom line, partly because of operating changes made during the recession.

“The recession allowed the Detroit makers to catch up to in a lot of critical ways to their import competition, particularly the Japanese,” says Paul Eisenstein, publisher of TheDetroitBureau.com. "They were able to shed a lot of debt, they were able to drive down costs, labor costs in particular. They squeezed their suppliers, they got rid of unnecessary plants."

Pent-up demand from buyers also became a factor as many automakers rolled out a bevy of refreshed models, particularly in the high-profit, SUV and light truck markets.

"They have product in the market that they don't have to incentivize people to buy,” says Kristin Dziczek of the Center for Automotive Research. Carmakers aren’t slashing sticker prices like they used to. But Dziczek says pressure to keep manufacturing costs low couldn’t be higher.

Per-car costs are much lower now because of wage and benefit concessions by the United Automobile Workers.  But the Detroit Three will negotiate a new four-year contract later this year. And this time labor wants a bigger share.

"Workers are going to be looking for base wage increases and more money, and companies are going to be looking for cost containment and cost constraint," Dziczek says.

Wage concessions have been key to a hiring surge at Ford.  On Wednesday, the company announced plans to add another 1,550 entry-level workers to help meet demand for its new F-150 trucks.

New Ebola cases 'rise in 2015'

BBC - Wed, 2015-02-04 10:56
New cases of Ebola have gone up for first time this year in Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone, the WHO says, as it releases its latest weekly figures.

'Fresh Off the Boat' star Constance Wu on Asians and TV

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2015-02-04 10:42

Tonight a new network show premieres that is by all accounts your typical family comedy. It features young, attractive parents raising kids in a new city. But there is one big difference that makes the show stand out. The family at its center is Asian.

More than 20 years ago Margaret Cho’s show “All American Girl” debuted on ABC, and now the network is trying again with “Fresh Off the Boat,” a loose adaptation of celebrity chef Eddie Huang’s best-selling memoir of the same name. It tells the story of Huang’s childhood in Orlando, Florida, after his family moves from Washington D.C. Constance Wu plays young Eddie’s mother, an immigrant from Taiwan.  

Wu says landing the role was a breath of fresh air for her:

“Usually I’ll be auditioning for the third lead and there will be Latina actresses, Indian actresses, African American actresses because it will be like, ‘let’s check off this box. We have our lead white girl and we need an ethnic slot.’ And I've actually been told ‘we've decided the guy’s best friend is going to be Asian so we needed the girl’s best friend to be black because we couldn't have two Asians. They want to check off their boxes, which in its own way is a kind of perverted gesture.”

Wu says she’s hoping “Fresh Off the Boat” along with ABC’s other minority-led shows “Black-ish” and “Cristela” signify changing tides industrywide:

“All the networks have always been willing to have ethnic people as the third or fourth lead or the best friend to the white person. But to actually let a black family or an Asian family carry a show, that’s something where there hasn't really been a precedent set in terms of a real financial gain. I think it’s good that they’re trying that, and I think it’s also necessary because the landscape of TV is changing.”

“Fresh Off the Boat” has faced some early criticism for stereotyping, and Eddie Huang recently wrote a piece for Vulture criticizing the show for being an "Asian sitcom for white people."  But Huang concludes by saying the show is still a positive step forward. Wu agrees:

“I’m really glad it’s happening, and it’s long overdue. There’s a lot of controversy in the Asian community about the fact that, for example, Scarlett Johansson recently was cast in the lead part for “Ghost in the Shell,” which is supposed to be an Asian female lead. And people are like, ‘Well, there is no Asian actor or actress who can carry that.’ And I understand from an investor’s viewpoint that if I want a return on my investment and I have Scarlett Johansson as my lead, I’ll probably get a bigger box office success than a no-name actor. That’s why I think our show, even if it’s not perfect, is important to the Asian community because if we do make money it’ll hopefully start the ball rolling in terms of finding that Asians can carry a show or a movie and be a box office draw, which will encourage investors to take that risk as well."

Starring in the first Asian-American sitcom in decades

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2015-02-04 10:42

Tonight a new network show premiere’s that is by all accounts your typical family comedy. It features young, attractive parents raising kids in a new city. But there is one big difference that makes the show stand out. The family at its center is Asian.

It was 20 years ago that Margaret Cho’s show “All American Girl” debuted on ABC, now the network is trying again with “Fresh Off the Boat,” a loose adaptation of celebrity chef Eddie Huang’s best-selling memoir of the same name.The show tells the story of Huang’s childhood in Orlando, Florida after his family moves from Washington DC. Constance Wu plays young Eddie’s mother, an immigrant from Taiwan.  

Wu says landing the role was a breath of fresh air for her:

“Usually I’ll be auditioning for the third lead and there will be Latina actresses, Indian actresses, African American actresses because it will be like, ‘let’s check off this box. We have our lead white girl and we need an ethnic slot.’ And I've actually been told ‘we've decided the guy’s best friend is going to be Asian so we needed the girl’s best friend to be black because we couldn't have two Asians. They want to check off their boxes, which in its own way is a kind of perverted gesture.”

Wu says she’s hoping “Fresh Off the Boat” along with ABC’s other minority-led shows “Black-ish” and “Cristela” signify changing tides industry wide:

“All the networks have always been willing to have ethnic people as the third or fourth lead or the best friend to the white person. But to actually let a black family or an Asian family carry a show, that’s something where there hasn't really been a precedent set in terms of a real financial gain. I think it’s good that they’re trying that and I think it’s also necessary because the landscape of TV is changing.”

“Fresh Off the Boat” has faced some early criticism for stereotyping, and Eddie Huang recently wrote a piece for Vulture criticizing the show for being an "Asian sitcom for white people."  But Huang concludes by saying the show is still a positive step forward. Wu says she agrees:

“I’m really glad it’s happening and it’s long overdue. There’s a lot of controversy in the Asian community about the fact that for example Scarlett Johansson recently was cast in the lead part for “Ghost in the Shell,” which is supposed to be an Asian female lead. And people are like, ‘well, there is no Asian actor or actress who can carry that.’ And I understand from an investor’s viewpoint that if I want a return on my investment and I have Scarlett Johansson as my lead, I’ll probably get a bigger box office success than a no name actor. That’s why I think our show, even if it’s not perfect, is important to the Asian community because if we do make money it’ll hopefully start the ball rolling in terms of finding that Asians can carry a show or a movie and be a box office draw which will encourage investors to take that risk as well."

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