National / International News

Hamilton must accept racing gods - Coulthard

BBC - Mon, 2014-07-21 14:20
David Coulthard reflects on the latest twist in the title battle between the Mercedes drivers at the German Grand Prix.

Sandwich Monday: The Menage A Trois

NPR News - Mon, 2014-07-21 14:01

For this week's Sandwich Monday, we try the Menage A Trois sandwich from Ike's Place in San Francisco. It features chicken with three sauces and three cheeses.

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Hospital Settles Lawsuit By Thousands Of Women Over Exam Photos

NPR News - Mon, 2014-07-21 13:51

The Baltimore-based Johns Hopkins Health System will pay $190 million to settle a class-action lawsuit that includes more than 7,000 women.

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VIDEO: Clashes go on amid Israeli funerals

BBC - Mon, 2014-07-21 13:49
Israel's defence minister says that the offensive in Gaza will continue 'as long as necessary to stop the Hamas rocket attacks.

Waiting in the (West) Wing

BBC - Mon, 2014-07-21 13:39
Struggling in the shadow of a potential Hillary Clinton campaign

Griffin defiant as he quits BNP job

BBC - Mon, 2014-07-21 13:31
Nick Griffin steps down as leader of the BNP after 15 years, saying he has guided his party "through the storm".

Breaking down the fees and taxes in a plane ticket

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-07-21 13:29

The Transportation Security Administration is increasing the fees it assesses travelers to $5.60 per leg of your flight.

What's that mean? If a layover is more than four hours, then the TSA considers that to be two trips and assesses the fee again.  So, that could mean about $22 extra on your layover flight. That made us wonder what are we paying for air travel these days.... besides the actual airfare, that is.

Let’s say you’ve got a $500 round trip ticket from New York City to Los Angeles with a long layover in each direction, here's what you'll be paying.

(Numbers courtesy of Airlines for America.)

Fare: $500

TSA 9/11 Fee: $5.6 per segment x 4 = $22.40 

Federal Aviation Excise Tax: 7.5% = $37.50

Flight Segment Tax: $4 per segment x 4 = $16.00

Airport passenger facilty charge: $4.50 per segment x 4 = $18.00

Effective Tax Rate: 18%.  This can vary depending on how many layovers and how expensive your fare is.  If this example fare were for a direct flight, for example, it would be taxed at an effective rate of 9 percent. 

Flying international? International flights have a whole additional set of fees depending on the country and the airport, and these fees can range into the hundreds of dollars. 

And let us not forget the fees for some kind of basic rudimentary comfort, says airline analyst Robert Mann, Jr:

Want to pick your own seat? $0 to $25

What about a seat with legroom? $25 up to hundreds of dollars

Check a bag? $0 to $80

Oh, you want to carry on that bag? $0 to $100

Hungry?  How does $5 for a snack and $15 for a sandwich sound?

The TSA has said historically, it spends significantly more money on aviation safety than it receives from airlines or passengers.  However, the revenues raised from government fees and excise taxes do not directly go to their supposed purpose, says George Hobica, founder of AirfareWatchDog.com.

“A lot of the money actually ends up in the general fund to reduce the deficit and never sees its way as was intended to improve air travel.”

Breaking down the fees and taxes in a plane ticket

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-07-21 13:29

The Transportation Security Administration is increasing the fees it assesses travelers to $5.60 per leg of your flight.

What's that mean? If a layover is more than four hours, then the TSA considers that to be two trips and assesses the fee again.  So, that could mean about $22 extra on your layover flight. That made us wonder what are we paying for air travel these days.... besides the actual airfare, that is.

Let’s say you’ve got a $500 round trip ticket from New York City to Los Angeles with a long layover in each direction, here's what you'll be paying.

(Numbers courtesy of Airlines for America.)

Fare: $500

TSA 9/11 Fee: $5.6 per segment x 4 = $22.40 

Federal Aviation Excise Tax: 7.5% = $37.50

Flight Segment Tax: $4 per segment x 4 = $16.00

Airport passenger facilty charge: $4.50 per segment x 4 = $18.00

Effective Tax Rate: 18%.  This can vary depending on how many layovers and how expensive your fare is.  If this example fare were for a direct flight, for example, it would be taxed at an effective rate of 9 percent. 

Flying international? International flights have a whole additional set of fees depending on the country and the airport, and these fees can range into the hundreds of dollars. 

And let us not forget the fees for some kind of basic rudimentary comfort, says airline analyst Robert Mann, Jr:

Want to pick your own seat? $0 to $25

What about a seat with legroom? $25 up to hundreds of dollars

Check a bag? $0 to $80

Oh, you want to carry on that bag? $0 to $100

Hungry?  How does $5 for a snack and $15 for a sandwich sound?

The TSA has said historically, it spends significantly more money on aviation safety than it receives from airlines or passengers.  However, the revenues raised from government fees and excise taxes do not directly go to their supposed purpose, says George Hobica, founder of AirfareWatchDog.com.

“A lot of the money actually ends up in the general fund to reduce the deficit and never sees its way as was intended to improve air travel.”

Orange really is the new black (and white)

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-07-21 13:29

The quarterly earnings report from Netflix came out this afternoon and Netflix did just fine, making just about as much money as everybody expected.

But that's not really the point. The biggest takeaway?

Netflix's comedy-drama series "Orange Is The New Black" was the most watched show on Neflix So many people watched world-wide, the orange jumpsuits in the series have apparently become chic enough to irritate the sheriff in Saginaw County, Michigan.

"You see people wearing all-orange jumpsuits at the mall," he said.

The local sheriff has become so fed up that he's started ordering the old-style black and white striped uniforms for his inmates.

Europeans weigh economic sanctions against Russia

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-07-21 13:29

Tensions between Russia and the West over the downing of a Malaysian Airlines plane may have receded slightly Monday. But President Vladimir Putin is still facing a fresh wave of economic sanctions. Tuesday, European Foreign Ministers meet to consider tough new action to pressure the Russians into helping end the fighting in eastern Ukraine. These would follow last week’s additional U.S. measures.

The Europeans have bickered for months over stepping up sanctions against the Kremlin. Countries like Britain want to hit the Russians hard, but the Germans and Italians – who are heavily dependent on Russian energy – are afraid of antagonizing President Putin. The French are in the process of supplying two warships to Moscow and don't want to rock the boat.

However, Britain’s Foreign Secretary, Phillip Hammond, says the downing of flight MH17 changes everything, uniting the Europeans.

“What we need to do now is use the sense of shock, the sense of outrage to galvanize opinion behind a more robust stance. We have tools in our tool box,” says Hammond.

The UK wants to follow the U.S.'s example and slap Putin’s inner circle of oligarchs with visa bans and asset freezes, even though that could harm London’s financial sector. Nina Shick of the Open Europe think tank says Europeans could also use their leverage as Russia’s biggest trading partner.

“They could target European exports to Russia, which Russia is dependent on," she says. “We’re talking about things like machinery and medicine. These are things that Russia depends on, things that Russia won’t be able to source easily from other places."

Russia could retaliate by turning off the oil and natural gas that supplies 30 percent of Europe’s energy needs. But that would spark an all out economic conflict which – some analysts claim – Europe would win.

“Any economic war would be compounded five-fold on Russia compared to that of the EU. If it were to genuinely get serious, then the effects on Russia would be such that I think President Putin is actually a very worried man right now,” says James Nixey of the Chatham House Institute.

But as they prepare for their meeting on Tuesday, some European foreign ministers are also very worried. They feel they have to punish Putin but without driving up their own energy costs and tipping their fragile economies back into recession.

PM: Crash Russia's 'defining moment'

BBC - Mon, 2014-07-21 13:11
Prime Minister David Cameron tells MPs the Malaysian Airlines crash in east Ukraine is a "defining moment" for Russia as he warns Moscow to stop fuelling the conflict there.

England will miss Gerrard - Hodgson

BBC - Mon, 2014-07-21 13:10
Roy Hodgson says England will miss Steven Gerrard's "leadership" following his captain's international retirement.

What The Odds Fail To Capture When A Health Crisis Hits

NPR News - Mon, 2014-07-21 13:05

Making health decisions based on the odds can be an extremely difficult thing to do when you're a patient, even for people who study the science of how we make decisions.

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UN demands MH17 crash site access

BBC - Mon, 2014-07-21 13:04
The UN Security Council adopts a resolution demanding access to the the rebel-held area of Ukraine where a Malaysia Airlines plane crashed.

Flight MH17: Black Boxes And Bodies Handed Over; U.N. Calls For Inquiry

NPR News - Mon, 2014-07-21 12:59

In a late-night exchange, pro-Russian separatists have given what they say are Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17's data recorders to Malaysian officials in eastern Ukraine.

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1 Million Net Neutrality Comments Filed, But Will They Matter?

NPR News - Mon, 2014-07-21 12:54

The last time the FCC saw this much public interest was after the Janet Jackson Super Bowl wardrobe malfunction. But research shows comments aren't likely to sway the agency's policy decision.

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For These Vegans, Masculinity Means Protecting The Planet

NPR News - Mon, 2014-07-21 12:53

A group of men in New York are challenging the stereotype that eating meat signifies manliness. Instead, they say that manhood can be proven by caring for the planet, not dominating it.

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Prior takes break from England duty

BBC - Mon, 2014-07-21 12:52
England wicketkeeper Matt Prior is to take a break from cricket for the rest of the summer to recover from injuries.

High-Performing Charter Schools May Improve Students' Health

NPR News - Mon, 2014-07-21 12:43

People who graduate from high school are healthier than people who drop out. To find out why, researchers looked at whether students who got into top charter schools were avoiding health risks.

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4 ideas from Nest CEO Tony Fadell

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-07-21 12:40

Tony Fadell is the founder and CEO of Nest, the company seeking to reinvent household techonolgy. The big idea... is an energy-saving, smart thermostat.

Fadell, a veteran of Apple., founded Nest Labs in 2010, which was acquired by Google earlier this year for $3.2 billion.

There are plenty of ideas floating around in Fadell's head, but here are four that came up in his interview with Kai Ryssdal:

Idea: We give too much power to one little switch.

There are about 250,000,000 U.S. thermostats operating in residential and light commercial buildings. The industry standard, Honeywell thermostat, has been around since 1953.

"When we look at the data," Fadell said, "less than 10 percent of those were ever programmed to save any energy."

Fadell said he was taken aback by how much power we give to the little on-and-off switches on the thermostats common in most homes: "[They're] controlling what amounts to be 50-to-60 percent of your total energy consumption for a year.. . That's really where the genesis of this whole idea started."

Idea: Making products people love matters.

"If you want to change people's behaviors or the way they think about something, you have to change the exterior," he says. "If you look at...thermostats on the wall today, they're ignored. People don't want to program them, people don't really use them." 

Fadell said Nest wanted to make sure the thermostats they were creating were eye-catching and engaging.

Their plan? Get customers "intrigued — that's how you grab them — through something that looks great, and then, ultimately, works great." 

Idea: Nest isn't a quick-hit, one-product company.

Fadell feels like it will take for him ten years to consider Nest (Nest Labs) profitable. And they have plenty of things to work on: Nest not only has the thermostat, but smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. The company also they just closed their acquisition of Dropcam.

"We could be profitable if we wanted to stop, but we have very, very big ambitions. This is a ten year kind of investment that we're making."

Idea: The disruption-innovation era isn't over yet.

In response to the idea that innovation and disruption are overrated, Fadell said that's simply not true.

Fadell said one innovation or disruption has the ability to unseat a market leader overnight - think Sony, Nokia and Blackberry.

"Look where Sony used to be just 15 years ago," he said. "These kinds of disrutptive techologies allow us to create all kinds of new businesses and new services. Look at Uber."

He said these kinds of disruptions are innovations that are packaged well enough for consumers to understand and embrace. 

"I think we're only going to see more of these types of changes coming, not less and less." 

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