National / International News

Will black Americans finally get a fair deal?

BBC - Thu, 2014-12-04 02:56
Recent events in Ferguson have highlighted unfairness in US society and the pressing need for reform, says Clive Myrie.

Super Typhoon Hagupit Takes Aim For The Philippines

NPR News - Thu, 2014-12-04 02:49

The storm is expected to be at least a category 4 when it hits the island chain on Friday. Some places are still recovering from the devastation wrought by Typhoon Haiyan in 2013.

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India 'hate speech' MP keeps job

BBC - Thu, 2014-12-04 02:49
India's prime minister refuses to sack junior minister Niranjan Jyoti, who used an abusive term to refer to non-Hindus at a political rally.

US hostage 'appears in Yemen video'

BBC - Thu, 2014-12-04 02:48
Al-Qaeda militants based in Yemen have published a video purporting to show a British-born US hostage and threatening to kill him.

AUDIO: Osborne attacks BBC cuts coverage

BBC - Thu, 2014-12-04 02:47
George Osborne has criticised BBC coverage of future spending cuts as "totally hyperbolic" in a Radio 4 interview following his Autumn Statement.

Mexico boosts security in Acapulco

BBC - Thu, 2014-12-04 02:47
Mexican federal forces are deployed to dozens of towns in a violence-ridden area of Mexico following the disappearance of 43 students in September.

Disney's Frozen Fever date announced

BBC - Thu, 2014-12-04 02:46
Disney's Frozen Fever will be shown ahead of Kenneth Branagh's live-action reimagining of Cinderella.

Frenchmen jailed for Tel Aviv crash

BBC - Thu, 2014-12-04 02:40
Two Frenchmen are jailed in Paris over a hit-and-run accident in 2011 in which a young Israeli woman was killed by a speeding car in Tel Aviv.

Shell has 'earliest human engraving'

BBC - Thu, 2014-12-04 02:37
Zig-zag patterns on a fossilised shell in Indonesia may be the earliest known engravings by a human ancestor, scientists say.

Readers abandon 'good news' website

BBC - Thu, 2014-12-04 02:30
'Good news day' decimates website's readership

Anfield expansion to 59,000 to begin

BBC - Thu, 2014-12-04 02:23
Liverpool say they will begin work on Monday to increase Anfield's capacity from about 45,500 to 59,000.

Google plans child-friendly products

BBC - Thu, 2014-12-04 02:23
Google is developing child-friendly versions of its search site, Chrome browser and video-sharing service YouTube, according to a US report.

No charges in Savile school inquiry

BBC - Thu, 2014-12-04 02:15
No prosecutions will be brought against former staff at a school in Surrey where Jimmy Savile abused girls, says the CPS.

Cannibal killer death cause mystery

BBC - Thu, 2014-12-04 02:07
The cause of death of a man suspected of murdering a woman in an act of cannibalism is still unknown, an inquest hears.

Spectre to be title of next Bond film

BBC - Thu, 2014-12-04 02:06
Spectre will be the title of the 24th official James Bond film, its makers announce.

Justice Department Plans New Cybercrime Team

NPR News - Thu, 2014-12-04 02:03

The reorganization being announced today will "provide a central hub for expert advice and legal guidance" and improve coordination among law enforcement, businesses and elected officials.

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Dalriada hospital to remain open

BBC - Thu, 2014-12-04 02:02
The Dalriada Hospital has won a temporary reprieve after a high court judge ruled it must continue to accept new patients.

Colleges pledge to graduate more low-income students

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-12-04 02:00

Hundreds of college leaders gathered in Washington, D.C. Thursday, armed with ideas to tackle one of higher education’s thorniest issues.  Just 1 in 10 people from low-income families has a college degree by age 25, according to the White House,  compared to half of people from wealthier families.

This is the second summit the Obama Administration has held this year that focuses on getting more low-income kids across the college finish line.  

Among the participants is Pat McGuire, president of Trinity Washington University, in Washington, D.C., where only around 35-40 percent of the school’s low-income students graduate on time. The college aims to raise that to 60 percent.  

One step is a new partnership with D.C. Public Schools to better prepare students in math.

“We get a lot of students who want to be nurses, but they have no idea how much math and science nurses have to have, so they’re unable to do well in those courses,” McGuire says. “If we could prepare students better starting in middle school and high school, we’d have better completion rates in college.”

Other initiatives announced today focus on improving college counseling in high schools, where the average counselor serves hundreds of students and has little training in college advising.

“Often school counselors only have their own personal experience to draw from,” says Alice Anne Bailey with the Southern Regional Education Board, a nonprofit group that works with southern states to improve public education.

The group’s College and Career Counseling Initiative trains school counselors in 14 states to help students through the process of preparing for and applying to college. Today the group announced an expansion of that program.

At the college level, leaders pledged to work together to help students graduate once they get in the door. The University Innovation Alliance, a group of 11 public research universities, pledged to graduate an additional 68,000 students in the next decade.

The alliance was created to share ideas, says Mark Becker, president of Georgia State University.  

“We’re trying to actually produce real evidence of what works, as opposed to just doing this shotgun approach of everybody’s going to make a commitment and try something,” Becker says.

One approach that’s catching on: big data.

In a little over a decade, Georgia State has raised its graduation rate from around 30 percent to more than 50 percent, Becker says, partly by analyzing patterns to predict which students are at risk of dropping out, and then stepping in to help them. 

A separate group of 14 state college and university systems also plans to use so-called predictive analytics to help students stay on track, according to the White House.

Trinity Washington University’s Pat McGuire had been critical of the Obama Administration’s previous efforts. The first summit in January favored Ivy League colleges and other elite schools, she says.

 “Just because a school is wealthy and prestigious doesn’t mean they’ll do a good job with a low-income student,” says McGuire. 

And just because hundreds of college leaders pledge to improve college completion rates doesn't mean it will be easy to move the needle.

The issues that get between students and college degrees have never been more complex or expensive to resolve. 

Colleges pledge to graduate more low-income students

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-12-04 02:00

Hundreds of college leaders gathered in Washington, D.C. Thursday, armed with ideas to tackle one of higher education’s thorniest issues.  Just 1 in 10 people from low-income families has a college degree by age 25, according to the White House,  compared to half of people from wealthier families.

This is the second summit the Obama Administration has held this year that focuses on getting more low-income kids across the college finish line.  

Among the participants is Pat McGuire, president of Trinity Washington University, in Washington, D.C., where only around 35-40 percent of the school’s low-income students graduate on time. The college aims to raise that to 60 percent.  

One step is a new partnership with D.C. Public Schools to better prepare students in math.

“We get a lot of students who want to be nurses, but they have no idea how much math and science nurses have to have, so they’re unable to do well in those courses,” McGuire says. “If we could prepare students better starting in middle school and high school, we’d have better completion rates in college.”

Other initiatives announced today focus on improving college counseling in high schools, where the average counselor serves hundreds of students and has little training in college advising.

“Often school counselors only have their own personal experience to draw from,” says Alice Anne Bailey with the Southern Regional Education Board, a nonprofit group that works with southern states to improve public education.

The group’s College and Career Counseling Initiative trains school counselors in 14 states to help students through the process of preparing for and applying to college. Today the group announced an expansion of that program.

At the college level, leaders pledged to work together to help students graduate once they get in the door. The University Innovation Alliance, a group of 11 public research universities, pledged to graduate an additional 68,000 students in the next decade.

The alliance was created to share ideas, says Mark Becker, president of Georgia State University.  

“We’re trying to actually produce real evidence of what works, as opposed to just doing this shotgun approach of everybody’s going to make a commitment and try something,” Becker says.

One approach that’s catching on: big data.

In a little over a decade, Georgia State has raised its graduation rate from around 30 percent to more than 50 percent, Becker says, partly by analyzing patterns to predict which students are at risk of dropping out, and then stepping in to help them. 

A separate group of 14 state college and university systems also plans to use so-called predictive analytics to help students stay on track, according to the White House.

Trinity Washington University’s Pat McGuire had been critical of the Obama Administration’s previous efforts. The first summit in January favored Ivy League colleges and other elite schools, she says.

 “Just because a school is wealthy and prestigious doesn’t mean they’ll do a good job with a low-income student,” says McGuire. 

And just because hundreds of college leaders pledge to improve college completion rates doesn't mean it will be easy to move the needle.

The issues that get between students and college degrees have never been more complex or expensive to resolve. 

VIDEO: Search continues for missing baby

BBC - Thu, 2014-12-04 02:00
Police investigating the disappearance of new mother Charlotte Bevan and her baby daughter Zaani are searching the area where a woman's body was discovered on Wednesday night.

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