National / International News

Secret tapes of Sarkozy ruled legal

BBC - Thu, 2015-05-07 03:19
A French court rules that wire-tapped conversations between ex-President Sarkozy and his lawyer can be used as evidence.

Caption Challenge: Space capsule

BBC - Thu, 2015-05-07 03:07
It's the Caption Challenge.

PODCAST: Big merger in the pharmaceutical industry

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2015-05-07 03:00

Airing on Thursday, May 7, 2015: One of the world's biggest drug companies has moved to outsource the process of deciding who is allowed into its experimental drug trials.Johnson & Johnson is setting up what's called a "compassionate use" panel to help it make these life & death decisions. Staying in the theme of pharmaceuticals,  Alexion announced it was buying Syngeva for $8.4 billion earlier this week. And it's election day in the U.K. today. Inequality has been a key theme of the campaign. We'll see how tax loopholes impact the results today. 

Man jailed over murder and rapes

BBC - Thu, 2015-05-07 02:58
A Falkirk man who raped two women in front of the body of an escort he had stabbed 44 times is jailed for life.

Judge orders maternity deal talks

BBC - Thu, 2015-05-07 02:47
The two sides in a dispute over plans to downgrade maternity services at a Denbighshire hospital are ordered to try and reach an agreement by a judge.

Tornadoes Rake Oklahoma, Destroying Homes, Injuring 12

NPR News - Thu, 2015-05-07 02:42

The Oklahoma city area was the hardest hit. Meteorologists believe that a line of thunderstorms spawned more than a dozen twisters.

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Pirate Capt Kidd's 'treasure' found

BBC - Thu, 2015-05-07 02:38
Archaeologists in Madagascar say they have found what is thought to be the treasure of notorious Scottish pirate William Kidd.

Ex CEO declines gas death questions

BBC - Thu, 2015-05-07 02:32
The former boss of tour operator Thomas Cook refuses to answer questions at the inquests into the deaths of two children who died from carbon monoxide poisoning while on holiday.

Five arrested over stabbing death

BBC - Thu, 2015-05-07 02:30
Detectives investigating the murder of a 27-year-old man in Leeds arrest five people.

VIDEO: Left for dead on the Lusitania

BBC - Thu, 2015-05-07 02:29
On the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Lusitania a County Down woman tells the story of her grandmother's remarkable survival

Thai police 'linked to trafficking'

BBC - Thu, 2015-05-07 02:27
Thai authorities say more than 50 officers are transferred from their posts over suspected links to human traffickers.

Victoria proposes to Harry in Sydney

BBC - Thu, 2015-05-07 02:27
Thousands of people wish Prince Harry well as his Australian army secondment ends - including one woman who proposed to him.

Meet The Tea Party's New Favorite Candidate

NPR News - Thu, 2015-05-07 02:03

Tea Party Republicans are trying to make a comeback and have found one candidate to get behind for the Senate in 2016 — Florida's Ron DeSantis, a former JAG Corps lawyer and Yale baseball captain.

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Voters head to the polls in Britain today

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2015-05-07 02:00

Voters go to the polls in a general election in Britain today. Inequality has been a key theme of the campaign. Especially for the Opposition Labour party. It has been getting some traction from one policy in particular: a plan to close a tax loophole. It's called the "non-dom" rule. Currently, more than  100,000  wealthy people living in Britain classed as non-domiciled or non-dom and not required to  pay tax on money they earn  abroad.

Leader of the Labour party Ed Miliband promises to abolish the rule if elected. Miliband's pledge is proving popular with the public, and has even struck a chord with some Conservative politicians.  Richard Bacon, a Conservative member in  a parliamentary committee sides with Miliband.  

But the non-doms have their defenders. In the most affluent part of London, we caught up with Russian property specialist Roman Grigrjev. He deplores the Labour plan. 

"What good is it to make London poor?  You don't get the country richer by restricting London from becoming  richer," Grigrjev says. 

Treasury Minister Pritti Patel agrees with the property specialist. Patel surmises it could cost the Treasury billions. "These non- doms will probably leave the country . There is no evidence that this will bring in substantial sums of money whatsoever," Patel states. 

Labour says it must  uphold a vital principle of fairness and equality  in taxation, whatever the cost. And we'll have to see how this move pans out in today's results. 

Click on the multimedia player above to hear more and click here to read our breakdown of the general election. 

One rare-disease biotech company buys another

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2015-05-07 02:00

Alexion Pharmaceuticals announced this week it is buying Synageva Biopharma for $8.4 billion. Alexion develops so-called orphan drugs, treatments for rare diseases. In the U.S., rare diseases, most of them genetic, affect about 30 million people.

If you're in the business of making drugs, you need people to sell them to. Even though the pool of people needing these treatments is smaller, the payoff is huge if you're a rare disease drug company, says Adam Feuerstein. He's senior columnist covering biotech at The Street.

"When you're charging $500,000 a year, that adds up." Feuerstein says. That's per patient. He says that's the main reason we're seeing all these mergers and acquisitions lately in biopharma. "There are just relatively few drugs being developed that can generate hundreds of millions and billions in dollars in sales."

Pete Mooney tracks the biotech industry for Deloitte.  "So it does a very strong social good as well," Mooney adds. He says also, governments have made this market lucrative, and they've removed lots of the roadblocks regular pharmaceutical companies face. So drugs get to market faster, and help people in need.

But, Mooney says, as always, companies have to balance the cost of developing these treatments with how affordable they'll be for patients.

 

 

Young money: how kids start their startups

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2015-05-07 02:00

If you've seen TV shows like "Shark Tank" and "Dragon's Den," you can probably picture a "3-day Startup." It's a program in Austin, Texas that helps college kids think up a business and pitch it to real life tech entrepreneurs, all in a single weekend. But recently, a technology camp called Stem Ed Labs had new idea. Instead of college students, what if high school kids had a shot? 

Fifteen-year old Quinn Buoy  is on day two of his "3-dayStartup." Yesterday, his team thought up a product: it's a robot motor that drives different vehicles. Now he's found two guys in a hotel lobby who'll hear out his pitch. Quinn is one of 40 kids picked by An Austin non profit called STEMed Labs, which teaches technology at weekend and summer camps. They co-sponsored this 3-DayStartup.

And this weekend is about Day three. Ebraille is a small slim, 17 inch, portable device to teach braille to the blind. Our revenue would be around $899, Riya Aggarwal says. Aggarwal is a 14-year-old participating in the program. She and the other high schoolers got a surprisingly rigorous grilling from the panel.

"Do you have any idea of the total market potential for this market?"

"My question to you is cost. I mean you came up with a price --- where did you come up with that? It seems incredibly complicated."

"We have a cost breakdown of our components, so each of the solenoids …." Aggarwal responsed patiently. 

Michael Henderson of Developers Doing Development was one of the panelists. "There are some smartup companies that have been operated for 4 to 6 months, they couldn't stand up to the same level of grilling and questioning," Henderson says. 

We asked d Maia Donohue, the project manager at 3dayStartup: if one of these pitches actually works, who gets the money? "There is not money for us, and we're a nonprofit, so we don't take any equity … So if one of these kids founds the next Facebook here, great, but we don't see any of the money for that," Donohue says. 

And no one wrote check today. Investment? Turns out to be a process of months. And for these kids? Probably a few more years.

How Western Union and MoneyGram dominate remittances

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2015-05-07 02:00

Earlier this week, Bloomberg reported that Western Union was thinking of acquiring MoneyGram. Western Union officially denied the story after the stock prices of both companies shot through the roof.

The two companies are the biggest players in the $500 billion dollar remittance industry, according to JMP Securities analyst David Scharf. 

"That combined footprint of 850,000 agents is considerably larger than the top ten or twenty fast food chains and other brands like Starbucks combined," Scharf says. 

But JP Morgan analyst Tien-Tsin Huang says they have had to lower fees because of competition from new services, banks and new entrants such as Wal-Mart.

Voters head to the polls in Britain today

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2015-05-07 02:00

Voters go to the polls in a general election in Britain today. Inequality has been a key theme of the campaign. Especially for the Opposition Labour party. It has been getting some traction from one policy in particular: a plan to close a tax loophole. It's called the "non-dom" rule. Currently, more than  100,000  wealthy people living in Britain classed as non-domiciled or non-dom and not required to  pay tax on money they earn  abroad.

Leader of the Labour party Ed Miliband promises to abolish the rule if elected. Miliband's pledge is proving popular with the public, and has even struck a chord with some Conservative politicians.  Richard Bacon, a Conservative member in  a parliamentary committee sides with Miliband.  

But the non-doms have their defenders. In the most affluent part of London, we caught up with Russian property specialist Roman Grigrjev. He deplores the Labour plan. 

"What good is it to make London poor?  You don't get the country richer by restricting London from becoming  richer," Grigrjev says. 

Treasury Minister Pritti Patel agrees with the property specialist. Patel surmises it could cost the Treasury billions. "These non- doms will probably leave the country . There is no evidence that this will bring in substantial sums of money whatsoever," Patel states. 

Labour says it must  uphold a vital principle of fairness and equality  in taxation, whatever the cost. And we'll have to see how this move pans out in today's results. 

Click on the multimedia player above to hear more. 

Biotech merger

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2015-05-07 02:00

Alexion Pharmaceuticals announced this week (Wed) it is buying Synageva Biopharma for $8.4 billion. Alexion develops so-called orphan drugs, treatments for rare diseases. In the U.S., rare diseases, most of them genetic, affect about 30 million people. We look at how finding the drugs to treat these conditions is big business

Thing about rare diseases is that they're, well, rare. And if you're in the business of making drugs, you need people to sell them to. Even though the pool of people needing these treatments is smaller, the payoff is huge if you're a rare disease drug company, says Adam Feuerstein. He's senior columnist covering biotech at The Street.

"When you're charging, you know $500,000 a year, that adds up." Feuerstein says. That's per patient. He says that's the main reason we're seeing all these mergers and acquisitions lately in biopharma. "There are just relatively few drugs being developed that can generate hundreds of millions and billions in dollars in sales."

Pete Mooney tracks the biotech industry for Deloitte.  "So it does a very strong social good as well," Mooney adds. He says also, governments have made this market lucrative, and they've removed lots of the roadblocks regular pharmaceutical companies face. So drugs get to market faster, and help people in need.

But, Mooney says as always, companies have to balance the cost of developing these treatments with how affordable they'll be for patients.

 

 

Blatter wants action on women's game

BBC - Thu, 2015-05-07 01:51
Fifa boss Sepp Blatter says women's football is "limping behind" the men's game in both profile and sponsorship.

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