National / International News

A Prom Like Any Other — But With A Few Exceptions

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-12 10:32

Oregon's teacher of the year organized the Aloha Prom for students with special needs. Students from other towns drove as much as an hour to attend Friday's event in Portland.

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Video 'shows missing Nigeria girls'

BBC - Mon, 2014-05-12 10:28
A Boko Haram video purports to show dozens of abducted Nigerian girls, as the government rejects an offer to swap them for imprisoned militants.

NI driving laws face overhaul

BBC - Mon, 2014-05-12 10:26
The drink-drive limit in Northern Ireland would be reduced by almost 40% and learner drivers would face big changes under a proposed new law.

Man jailed for murdering former boss

BBC - Mon, 2014-05-12 10:21
A former employee is jailed for a minimum of 25 years after pleading guilty to murdering the boss of a Kent fishing business.

Thousands gather for City parade

BBC - Mon, 2014-05-12 10:05
Thousands of Manchester City fans gather in the city's Albert Square to celebrate the club winning the Premier League.

The English language is one big brand graveyard

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-05-12 10:03

Turns out, the English language is a graveyard for brand names. We have a lot of words that were once trademarked brands.

Aspirin. Cellophane. Escalator. 

Yo Yo. Trampoline. Saran wrap.

Heroin.

Yeah, Heroin was a brand. Like Nike. Or Aunt Jemima.

“There used to be a branded form of morphine called heroin,” says Roger Schechter who teaches law at George Washington University. There’s a great list here.

Genericide and the Menace of Slang

(Can someone please make a movie with that title?)

In some cases, companies just went out of business and their brand name lived on as nouns. In other cases, the trademark was taken from them. In all cases, the trademarked name had become a generic buzz word for a type of product. The trademark and a company’s rights to it then slip away into the roiling ether of vernacular English. 

Intellectual property lawyers have a word for this: Genericide.

“It’s a disaster,” says Schechter: When trademark rights are lost, competitors can use the same word that you spent your life building up.

Sentenced to Death

It’s happened most often to companies that have invented something totally new, for which a word doesn't already exist.

“For example, a Frisbee,” says Ron Butters, professor Emeritus at Duke University. “What else do you call it?” (Frisbee, however, hasn’t yet lost its trademark).

The official, legally binding moment of trademark death occurs where many, many words have been sentenced to torture by parsing: in court.

“Company A will sue company B for trademark infringement, and company B will respond by saying ‘Your term has become generic and your mark needs to be canceled,” says Butters.

To prove it, lawyers would enlist linguists like Butters to do surveys and word counts in print, on TV, and online to see if people use a brand name in a generic way. That’s really all it takes. 

Synonyms and Vaccines

But, Butters says, genericide “doesn’t happen very often anymore.”

There’s a reason so many of the examples date from the middle of the 20th century. These days, companies do everything they can to prevent genericide.

“A classic example is Xerox,” says Jed Wakefield, a partner at Fenwick and West, where he advises firms who are anxious about losing their trademarks. “Xerox years ago used to advertise to remind the public that Xerox is a brand name for a photocopier and it’s not a generic term for making a photocopy.”

What Xerox did there was give the public another word to use instead of Xerox. The word “photocopy.” It’s a kind of legal vaccine. A company that did not offer up any alternative noun soon enough was Trampoline. The trademark died, but the noun lived on.

Generitol (jargonium methyl legalese) Cures What Ails You

The pharmaceutical industry has become especially adept at this synonym technique, says Schechter.

“When Viagra comes off patent, there’s going to be an enormous number of companies wanting to sell ‘generic Viagra’,” he says. “But they can’t call it that.”

It's not just because Viagra is trademarked, but because Pfizer has offered an alternate name: Sildenafil Citrate. It’s clearly placed on every logo. And it’s not particularly catchy. 

Have Your Cake And Brand It Too

Ideally, a firm these days could enjoy the best of both worlds: have their product become so popular that it begins to be used as a verb or noun, and still have everyone know it’s a brand at the same time.

“Like FedEx, someone might say 'I’ll FedEx that to you,'” says Wakefield. “One could certainly argue that’s promotional for the FedEx brand.” But FedEx the company would almost certainly not allow another shipping firm to use the word in any capacity.

“We counsel clients on where to draw the line, and ultimately where you draw those lines is as much a business question as a legal judgement.”

Man 'advised to delete UKIP tweet'

BBC - Mon, 2014-05-12 10:00
A blogger who tweeted "fact checks" about UKIP says police officers advised him to delete the tweet.

India exit polls predict Modi win

BBC - Mon, 2014-05-12 09:53
Exit polls suggest a win for Narendra Modi, leader of India's main opposition BJP, as voting ends in the marathon general election.

Veteran Congressman Makes A Career-Threatening Mistake

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-12 09:48

Democratic Rep. John Conyers failed to submit enough valid signatures to appear on the August primary ballot, a campaign misstep that has some wondering if he's still up to the job.

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US Navy releases 'stealth' e-reader

BBC - Mon, 2014-05-12 09:35
The US Navy has released a special e-reader, dubbed the Navy eReader Device, with stripped-down features to avoid enemy detection.

VIDEO: House of Commons

BBC - Mon, 2014-05-12 09:30
Michael Gove defends his free schools programme following a coalition row over funding.

S Korea honours ferry crew 'martyrs'

BBC - Mon, 2014-05-12 09:30
Three crew members who died saving passengers on the South Korean ferry that sank last month are recognised as heroes by the government.

Driving While Pregnant Is Riskier Than You Might Think

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-12 09:30

Expectant mothers are more likely to get into serious car crashes, a study finds. The risk is highest in the second trimester, when accident rates are similar to those for people with sleep apnea.

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Reports: FCC Chairman Revising Net Neutrality Rules

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-12 09:24

The chairman is weighing whether to allow Internet providers to sell fast lanes to content companies seeking faster delivery to its customers.

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There's more to chlorine than just swimming pools

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-05-12 09:21

It keeps your pools clean and safe, it's half of the compound that makes up table salt, and -- in its purest form -- it can kill you.

And those are only three of the things chlorine can do.

"There are something like 15,000 chlorine-based chemicals that are used in industry," says the BBC's Justin Rowlatt.

One of the best examples is PVC--polyvinyl chloride, the durable plastic that the construction industry uses heavily. Over 70 percent of PVC makes up basically everything: drain pipes, vinyl floors, roofing products, and double-glazed window panes.

There's a funny side effect to its ubiquity in construction: Demand is tied to property booms and busts.

And because the supply of sodium is tied to that of chlorine--remember, table salt is made of both--a collapse in the housing market could make staple products that rely on sodium, such as soap and paper, more expensive.

As for the chlorine in swimming pools, it's not actually pure chlorine. It's actually a chlorine compound called "chloramine," which is created when chlorine reacts with organic substances in the water.

Those organic substances? Let's just leave it at this: there's a reason why the chlorine smell in the pool is much stronger when the pool is full of kids.

AUDIO: Richard and Judy agree 'death pact'

BBC - Mon, 2014-05-12 09:20
TV personalities Judy Finnigan and husband Richard Madeley have said they have agreed to an assisted death pact should one of them fall seriously ill.

'Nothing can stop glaciers' retreat'

BBC - Mon, 2014-05-12 09:18
Key glaciers in West Antarctica are in an irreversible retreat over the next few centuries, adding at least 1.2m to sea level rise, scientists at Nasa say.

Brighton head coach Garcia resigns

BBC - Mon, 2014-05-12 09:17
Brighton accept head coach Oscar Garcia's resignation following their Championship play-off semi-final defeat.

Monday's gossip column

BBC - Mon, 2014-05-12 08:35
Chelsea's David Luiz flirts with PSG, Marco Reus dismisses Manchester United, three Premier League teams in for Xavi, and more.

More Cyclists Can Now Call AAA For Help

NPR News - Mon, 2014-05-12 08:16

AAA sends mechanics and trucks to help cyclists on the road, in new programs from auto clubs in New England and Colorado. The service was announced in time for this week's Bike to Work Day

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