National / International News

I will return stronger, says Bale

BBC - Wed, 2015-05-13 14:43
Gareth Bale says he will return stronger for Real Madrid after their Champions League semi-final defeat to Juventus.

Farc wants ELN at Colombia talks

BBC - Wed, 2015-05-13 14:39
The FARC rebel movement in Colombia is asking the government to include a smaller guerrilla group, the ELN in peace talks as soon as possible, to end more than fifty ears of conflict.

American, Indians Among Victims Of Kabul Attack

NPR News - Wed, 2015-05-13 14:39

Gunmen attacked a guesthouse frequented by foreigners in the Afghan capital. No one has yet claimed responsibility.

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There's More To Farm-Fresh Prairie Food Than Steak And Soybeans

NPR News - Wed, 2015-05-13 14:32

In New Prairie Kitchen, a Nebraska food writer collects recipes and stories from Great Plains chefs and farmers. Their movement utilizes local ingredients like bison, morels and black walnuts.

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VIDEO: Gunfire and confusion in Burundi coup

BBC - Wed, 2015-05-13 14:09
An attempted military coup is underway in Burundi with heavy gunfire in the capital Bujumbura and thousands of civilians fleeing the small, land-locked country.

Attempt to scam council of £100,000

BBC - Wed, 2015-05-13 14:07
An investigation begins into how the former Derry City Council paid almost £100,000 into a fraudulent bank account.

VIDEO: Is this preacher a radicalising force?

BBC - Wed, 2015-05-13 13:59
The BBC's Gordon Corera reports on the radical Islamist preacher, Anjem Choudary, who some believe has prompted the government's plans to tackle extremism.

Facebook Courts News Giants Into A Deal To Share Viewers, And Profits

NPR News - Wed, 2015-05-13 13:56

Nine media organizations, including The New York Times and National Geographic, have signed a deal to distribute their content through a new Facebook feature called "Instant Articles."

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Charities, Locals And Bikers Help Repair Nepal After New Quake

NPR News - Wed, 2015-05-13 13:56

Nepal was just recovering from the first earthquake when a second one hit on Tuesday. People are fearful but more determined than ever to rebuild their country.

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How the US reacted to Brady ban

BBC - Wed, 2015-05-13 13:55
Protests, fundraising, billboards and... Donald Trump: How America has reacted to Tom Brady's 'deflate-gate' ban.

Smokers More Likely To Quit If Their Own Cash Is On The Line

NPR News - Wed, 2015-05-13 13:50

A carrot isn't enough — bring on the stick. A study finds smokers are more likely to quit tobacco if they lose some of their own money after a relapse, than if they get a bonus for quitting the habit.

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VIDEO: Winkleman: 'My daughter was on fire'

BBC - Wed, 2015-05-13 13:47
Strictly Come Dancing presenter Claudia Winkleman has spoken for the first time about the serious injuries her daughter suffered in a Halloween costume fire.

'Broader appeal' needed from Labour

BBC - Wed, 2015-05-13 13:45
The First Minister in Wales has said the Labour Party must appeal to a broader range of voters in the future.

'Instagram for doctors' is grisly and useful

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2015-05-13 13:30

Note: This story contains some graphic images.

While you’re on Instagram looking at puppies, artisan desserts and celebrity selfies, some doctors are on a different photo sharing app, looking at gangrene, gallstones and rashes.

First-year emergency medicine resident John Corker has just uploaded a photo. It’s of a fresh red and greenish wound on the top of a right foot.

“What you’re looking at here is a badly infected foot," he says. "It's a commentary on what can happen when patients don’t have good follow up.”

He put this photo on Figure 1 – an app that’s been called the "Instagram for doctors." Sitting on a bench outside of Parkland Hospital in Dallas, Corker scrolls down below the image to reveal it was starred by a number of people, "which means they appreciated the image" he says.

Courtesy of John Corker

It might seem like a strange thing to appreciate, but hundreds of thousands of people have created an account on Figure 1. Most are doctors, like Corker, who join the service to learn about medical conditions and share the occasionally gruesome photo. The x-rays, lesions, tumors and gunshot wounds are categorized by anatomy and specialty. Corker says in the emergency room, access like this is invaluable.

“If I’m able to log on to Instagram or Figure 1 and see a picture of something that I learned about three years ago in medical school that I may see in the future, that’s really helpful for my learning going forward,” Corker says, 

Unlike Instagram, Figure 1 requires users to remove all personal details – faces or birthmarks, for example – from the photos they post.

“The best way to keep a secret is not to have it,” says 34-year-old critical care doctor and Figure 1 co-founder Joshua Landy.

“We give them all the tools they need to remove any potentially private details from the photo," Landy says. "There’s an automatic tool to block out faces, tools that let you block out name, date, tattoos, or other identifying marks that might be in the photo.”

Then Landy and a small team review each image before giving the final go-ahead.

Figure 1

Of course, doctors are supposed to ask for consent before snapping a photo of that amputated finger or bumpy rash, but there’s some variation in what counts as consent.

“We encourage all users to get consent. However, they’re not restricted to using our consent form. They’re permitted to using the consent form from their jurisdiction. Some hospitals require it to be done on paper, and some require it to be using voices instead of just paper.”

Now if you’re thinking all this photo snapping and sharing is new, it’s not.

Classic textbooks are teeming with images of guts and brains spliced and splayed in professional lighting. In some specialties, like dermatology, photos are especially useful.

“We diagnose and treat based on seeing, feeling, and examining the skin. Looking for rashes, abnormalities — and so pictures inherently are a daily part of our practice,” says dermatologist Seemal Desai.

Figure 1

As medical file sharing and photo sharing become ubiquitous, Desai has a few words of advice to doctors about to hit upload: “Always keep in the back of your mind, 'Is what I’m doing in the best interest of my patient?' And, 'Is this going to help outcome of my patient?' And if the answer is no, you don’t need to be involved in it,” he says.

If you want to peruse the archives of Figure 1, you don’t have to be a doctor or a nurse. Lurkers are allowed. In fact, nearly 10 percent of Figure 1 users are not in health care. You won’t be allowed to comment, but you can admire close-ups of busted lips and green glistening gallstones to your heart's content.

House Approves USA Freedom Act, Extending And Revising The Patriot Act

NPR News - Wed, 2015-05-13 13:18

The USA Freedom Act would extend many parts of the surveillance legislation while also barring the NSA's massive collection of Americans' phone data. The measure's fate in the Senate is uncertain.

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Train Derailment Highlights Amtrak's Infrastructure Needs

NPR News - Wed, 2015-05-13 13:15

Amtrak was created in the 1970s to allow several private railroads to get out of the passenger business. Experts say that while its safety record is generally good, it needs upgrading.

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Tui ending Thomson and First Choice

BBC - Wed, 2015-05-13 13:12
The travel firm Tui is dropping the Thomson and First Choice travel brands in a revamp of its business.

Burundi president 'fails to return'

BBC - Wed, 2015-05-13 13:10
Burundi President Pierre Nkurunziza's attempt to return home to tackle a coup fails and he has returned to Tanzania, officials there say.

Donut-shaped 'compass' in fly brain

BBC - Wed, 2015-05-13 13:01
Neuroscientists observe compass-like activity sweeping around a dense ring of cells inside the brain of fruit flies.

Standards For Child Migrants Could Force Detention Centers To Close

NPR News - Wed, 2015-05-13 13:00

The Obama administration has detained thousands of immigrant women and children, but that could soon change. A court case is challenging whether it is ever legal to hold children for long periods.

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