National / International News

VIDEO: Pakistan's cave-dwelling community

BBC - Wed, 2015-06-10 15:07
Shaimaa Khalil meets a community of people in Pakistan who live in man-made caves.

Mexican wrestling grapples with future

BBC - Wed, 2015-06-10 15:03
Mexican wrestling grapples to secure a bright future

Star players 'want to join Man City'

BBC - Wed, 2015-06-10 14:40
Chairman Khaldoon Al Mubarak believes leading players now want to join Manchester City for more than just money.

Armitage 'disruptive for England'

BBC - Wed, 2015-06-10 14:38
World Cup winner Jonny Wilkinson says a late World Cup call-up for Steffon Armitage would have been disruptive for England.

Alarm sounded over climate summit

BBC - Wed, 2015-06-10 14:21
Negotiators have been accused of spending too much time on detail and ''not getting around to any actual homework'' at interim climate talks in Germany.

VIDEO: Carney: 'Accountability needs balance'

BBC - Wed, 2015-06-10 14:09
The governor of the Bank of England calls for a "better balance" between individual and firm accountability.

Libertarian Magazine 'Reason' Target Of Federal Subpoena

NPR News - Wed, 2015-06-10 14:03

Federal prosecutors want the magazine to turn over the identities of six users who posted threatening comments against the federal judge in the Silk Road case.

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VIDEO: Inside US anti-IS command centre

BBC - Wed, 2015-06-10 13:58
The United States confirms it is sending an additional 450 troops to Iraq to help boost the training of government forces.

Man dies and woman injured in crash

BBC - Wed, 2015-06-10 13:54
A man in his 50s is killed in a car crash in Kesh in County Fermanagh.

Polish ministers quit over leak row

BBC - Wed, 2015-06-10 13:48
Three Polish government ministers and the country's parliamentary Speaker resign amid a growing row over leaked tapes.

Missouri Slow To Advance A Post-Ferguson Agenda

NPR News - Wed, 2015-06-10 13:47

While several states have passed new laws aimed to curb excessive force by police, there's been surprisingly little traction in Missouri, where Michael Brown's death spurred international protests.

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Fitness tracker firms in legal row

BBC - Wed, 2015-06-10 13:47
The wearable fitness tracker, Jawbone, has filed a second legal case against its rival Fitbit.

Ten reasons to watch Copa America

BBC - Wed, 2015-06-10 13:45
From the superstars to the forgotten faces, Tim Vickery outlines 10 reasons to watch this year's Copa America.

NY killer fugitives 'now in Vermont'

BBC - Wed, 2015-06-10 13:37
Two convicted murderers who have been on the run for five days after breaking out of prison may have fled to Vermont, police believe.

Silence over UN emissions targets

BBC - Wed, 2015-06-10 13:35
Politicians at a UN climate conference in Bonn, Germany are refusing to discuss whether their polices will actually protect the climate.

Germany 1-2 USA

BBC - Wed, 2015-06-10 13:11
Bobby Wood's late strike gives Jurgen Klinsmann's USA victory over Germany in a friendly in Cologne.

SAS march had 'occasional deaths'

BBC - Wed, 2015-06-10 13:05
A helicopter paramedic scrambled to an SAS test march was told "we occasionally get deaths on these exercises", an inquest hears.

What Big Pharma wants from the big trade deal

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2015-06-10 13:00

On Wednesday, a few pages from the secret Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement were published by Wikileaks and reported on by the New York Times. They seemed to indicate changes that go against the wishes of the pharmaceutical industry, eliminating language that sought to guarantee drug companies “competitive market-derived prices” when they sell overseas. 

But the pharmaceutical industry has been lobbying lawmakers on the TPP since the beginning, and shaping far more than this one section of the agreement, according to Lee Drutman, senior fellow at the New America foundation and author of "The Business of America Is Lobbying."

Jay Taylor, head of international affairs for the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America says the industry is seeking, among other things, vital protections of intellectual property. But Judit Rius Sanjuan, head of the Doctors Without Borders' Access Campaign, says these protections could drive up the price of lifesaving drugs in the developing world. 

A California drought loser: pool contractors

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2015-06-10 13:00

The backyard swimming pool may be an icon of suburban California, but as the state’s drought drags on, it’s a prime target for water conservation. Water utilities are putting in mandatory conservation rules and the swimming pool industry is on the losing end.

The drought is top of mind for many customers that walk into the showroom of Royal Pools in San Jose. “They want to know,” said Royal Pools’ Marc Hannigan. “Our customers who are under contract, whose pools are under way right now, are asking: is there going to be water to fill my pool?”

The concern is real, because almost 30 California cities and water agencies have banned filling new pools with potable water during the drought. Others are considering similar rules, which doesn’t surprise Hannigan. He says pools are an easy target.

“It is very symbolic and it looks good, banning swimming pools,” he said. “Really, swimming pools don’t waste water like people think they do.”

Hannigan is referring to an often-cited analysis by the Santa Margarita Water District comparing the water use in backyard pools to landscaping. A new built-in pool can require 20,000 to 30,000 gallons to fill. After that, it uses much less, just topping off.

“You put a cover on those pools, evaporation is done,” Hannigan said. “Fully half the pools we build here have automatic covers on them.”

A lawn can guzzle 20,000 gallons every year. According to the study, a pool, especially with a cover, can use less than a lawn does over time, but it takes three to five years to reach the break-even point.

Some water utilities say that’s too long to wait, because they’re facing steep cutbacks this year, up to 36 percent of their water use. So the drought rules they’re adopting are designed to send a message.

“The tens of thousands of gallons that it takes to fill a pool may not matter much in aggregate,” said San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo. “But the reality is that compared to the necessity of the use of water for drinking, for our everyday needs, pools simply aren’t that high a priority.”

Other cities have cited similar concerns, saying in a drought as serious as this one, only essential uses of water should be allowed.

“We’re all in this thing together, and that means we all need to tighten our belts and in some ways, that’s not always comfortable,” Liccardo said.

Hannigan says the pool industry is already feeling pretty uncomfortable.

“What we don’t know is how many people aren’t calling,” he said. “How many people want a pool and are waiting, after four or five years of recession? Now they have the money and wherewithal to put a pool in, and they’re not calling.”

For now, the pool industry is getting creative. In one Bay Area city, Hannigan’s company is planning on filling a new pool by draining an old one and trucking the water over.

A California drought loser: pool contractors

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2015-06-10 13:00

The backyard swimming pool may be an icon of suburban California, but as the state’s drought drags on, it’s a prime target for water conservation. Water utilities are putting in mandatory conservation rules and the swimming pool industry is on the losing end.

The drought is top of mind for many customers that walk into the showroom of Royal Pools in San Jose. “They want to know,” said Royal Pools’ Marc Hannigan. “Our customers who are under contract, whose pools are under way right now, are asking: is there going to be water to fill my pool?”

The concern is real, because almost 30 California cities and water agencies have banned filling new pools with potable water during the drought. Others are considering similar rules, which doesn’t surprise Hannigan. He says pools are an easy target.

“It is very symbolic and it looks good, banning swimming pools,” he said. “Really, swimming pools don’t waste water like people think they do.”

Hannigan is referring to an often-cited analysis by the Santa Margarita Water District comparing the water use in backyard pools to landscaping. A new built-in pool can require 20,000 to 30,000 gallons to fill. After that, it uses much less, just topping off.

“You put a cover on those pools, evaporation is done,” Hannigan said. “Fully half the pools we build here have automatic covers on them.”

A lawn can guzzle 20,000 gallons every year. According to the study, a pool, especially with a cover, can use less than a lawn does over time, but it takes three to five years to reach the break-even point.

Some water utilities say that’s too long to wait, because they’re facing steep cutbacks this year, up to 36 percent of their water use. So the drought rules they’re adopting are designed to send a message.

“The tens of thousands of gallons that it takes to fill a pool may not matter much in aggregate,” said San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo. “But the reality is that compared to the necessity of the use of water for drinking, for our everyday needs, pools simply aren’t that high a priority.”

Other cities have cited similar concerns, saying in a drought as serious as this one, only essential uses of water should be allowed.

“We’re all in this thing together, and that means we all need to tighten our belts and in some ways, that’s not always comfortable,” Liccardo said.

Hannigan says the pool industry is already feeling pretty uncomfortable.

“What we don’t know is how many people aren’t calling,” he said. “How many people want a pool and are waiting, after four or five years of recession? Now they have the money and wherewithal to put a pool in, and they’re not calling.”

For now, the pool industry is getting creative. In one Bay Area city, Hannigan’s company is planning on filling a new pool by draining an old one and trucking the water over.

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