National / International News

Women win police sex case battle

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-02 05:00
The Met cannot rely on its "neither confirm nor deny" policy in its legal battle with women who say they were duped into sexual relationships with two undercover officers, a judge rules.

This is what happens when the White House calls

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-07-02 05:00

So here's something I don't get to say every day.

The White House called Tuesday.

I know, right?!

They said if I can be in Washington on Wednesday by 2 p.m., I can have 15 minutes with the President.

So...we said "Sure." (Duh.)

A funny thing happens when that happens, though.

We gather a brainstorming team, of course, to figure out what we want to get out of the interview and how to frame the questions.

But then the ideas start coming. Everybody's got a thought on what I should ask him – which is great. Catch is, I've only got a finite amount of brain space to process all those ideas.

So the closer the interview gets, the more the stress mounts.

It happened last time we had the President on, too. Exactly this way. More and more ideas, less and less time to process them, until that moment when he and I shook hands as we prepared to sit down.

Then – and this is the only way to describe it – I had a moment of clarity. I knew how the interview was going to go, I knew how his answers were going to go, and I knew exactly how it was going to turn out.

And it did. Just like I thought it would.

All of which is to say – I'll be in Washington today.

Because the White House called.

The interview airs on Thursday. Here's the way it turned out last time. Me and the leader of the free world. On folding chairs. In the middle of the desert.

Video Credits:

Produced by Preditorial http://preditorial.tv

Music:

"Faster Does It" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com

Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

"Backed Vibes (clean)" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com

Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

"Shades of Spring" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com

Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

"Acid Trumpet" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com

Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Sarkozy placed under investigation

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-02 04:55
Ex-French President Nicolas Sarkozy is placed under formal investigation over alleged influence peddling, after a day of police questioning.

Man jailed for murdering teenager

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-02 04:54
A man who murdered his teenage girlfriend before burying her body in a park is jailed for a minimum of 20 years.

Body of Palestinian teenager found

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-02 04:54
Clashes erupt between Palestinian youths and Israeli police after the body of a Palestinian teenager kidnapped in East Jerusalem is found.

Woman gives birth outside Primark

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-02 04:53
A woman gives birth to a girl in front of dozens of onlookers on one of Birmingham city centre's busiest streets.

Richards available in cut-price deal

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-02 04:46
Manchester City are willing to accept a cut-price fee with add-ons for out-of-favour defender Micah Richards.

UK house prices 'surpass 2007 peak'

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-02 04:46
UK house prices have risen above their peak of 2007, the Nationwide says, after prices climbed 1% in June and were up 11.8% from a year earlier.

VIDEO: Leaders clash on NHS waiting times

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-02 04:44
Ed Miliband claims David Cameron fails to answer directly his questions over waiting times for cancer patients.

Could Tourette's syndrome make a goalkeeper better?

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-02 04:38
Tim Howard's World Cup goalkeeping was widely praised. Did his Tourette's syndrome help?

VIDEO: Circus life and more arts stories

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-02 04:32
An exhibition in Brazil gives an insight into circus life, a retrospective of a hugely influential British pop artist, Kensington Garden's new fibreglass construction - and more from the world of arts.

VIDEO: House of Commons

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-02 04:27
David Cameron defends his record on the NHS after Labour claims waiting times are up.

Women close to F1 breakthrough - Wolff

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-02 04:27
Formula 1 could see a female grand prix competitor in the near future, says Williams development driver Susie Wolff.

Met 'deleted discrimination record'

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-02 04:07
The Metropolitan Police told staff to delete findings supporting an officer's claim of discrimination from a report, an employment tribunal rules.

Firefighters to join one-day strike

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-02 04:07
Firefighters in England and Wales will join a one-day strike by public sector workers on 10 July, the Fire Brigades Union announces.

Not just T-Mobile: how bogus charges get on your bill

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-07-02 04:00

The FTC says T- Mobile made hundreds of millions of dollars from bogus charges on consumers phone bills. The charges were from third parties, but T-Mobile’s cut was allegedly as much as 40 percent.

"These were charges for things like flirting tips, dating tips, horoscopes, and other things that the consumer didn’t want," says FTC attorney Malini Mithal. "This is a practice called mobile cramming."

And it’s not something that T-Mobile invented.  "It’s been going on for years—decades even," says David Butler, a spokesman for Consumers Union. "Long before the popularity of wireless phones, landline phone users were getting hit by cramming charges."

A Senate Commerce Committee investigation from 2011 estimated the costs to consumers across the industry in the billions. The committee report details just how consumers end up getting stuck with these charges: 

1. 100 Percent, straight-up scamming. Billers just submit customer phone numbers to telecoms.

That includes unpublished numbers that nobody actually uses for phone calls. 

"Numerous businesses and government agencies told Committee staff they have incurred crammed charges on telephone lines that are dedicated to alarm systems, elevators, modems, and other lines that are not assigned to any employees," says the report. Many of the numbers were completely unpublished. A fax line got billed for music downloads. An ATM line got billed for "Internet services." 

A man in Connecticut fought charges from "Talent & More," which was charging his mother-in-law for hosting an online profile marketed to casting agents. "My mother-in-law us 82 years old, does not have internet access, and would not know how to use a website," he wrote to the state attorney general.

2.  Dummy calls to get bogus "authorization"

Business owners told the Senate committee staff that when they tried to fight bogus charges, they were told there was a recording of them giving authorization. The committee got some of those recordings, which "show telemarkets quickly reading through long scripts, while employees answer 'yes' or 'okay' to questions they clearly do not understand." 

3. Soliciting business via text... and not taking "no" for an answer

One company allegedly sent text messages offering horoscopes, dating tips and other services, and (according to the complaint in a class-action lawsuit) started charging people even if they replied "STOP" or called to say they didn't want the service. 

4.  With telecoms generally turning a blind eye — and sharing the profits

The Senate committee estimated that phone companies, which take a cut from third-party transactions, made more than a billion dollars from the practice over a ten-year period, and found that telecom companies did little to help their customers fight charges, or to check out companies that were obvious scammers.  

Which is pretty much what the FTC is charging in T-Mobile’s case.  The FTC says the company ignored signs that charges were bogus. And that the company buried those charges deep inside phone bills.

For its part, T-Mobile doesn’t dispute that stuff like this happened. But the company says it stopped billing for these services in late 2013.

For further reading:  Our friends at Ars Technica have been covering the cramming story for years, starting with an account by editor Nate Anderson of his own experience getting crammed in 2008

Here's an example the FTC says comes from a T-Mobile bill:

 

Train-hopping in the digital age

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-07-02 04:00

Train hopping, or the act of getting on freight trains without permission and riding them from depot to depot, is illegal and dangerous. It's also something that is, for many, a romantic endeavor, capturing the American spirit of adventure and travel.

Ted Conover did some train hopping in his youth, later writing a book about the experience entitled, "Rolling Nowhere: Riding the Rails with America's Hoboes." When his son Asa read his book, he felt the impulse to go train hopping himself. So Ted and Asa took a trip together, discovering along the way that new technology had changed the game.

In Ted’s experience, one of the hardest things used to be knowing where one was geographically while riding on a train; less of an issue today in an age of GPS-enabled phones.

Smartphones also allowed Asa an advantage over his father's earlier train-hopping days: the ability to document the experience in greater detail.

“I was on the trip to see what riding trains was like, rather than what being a hobo was like,” Asa said.

In addition to keeping them abreast of their location, the smartphones they were using let them contact home, document the trip through photos, and download a digital copy of an older guide to riding the rails, which the pair used often during the trip.

But even with digital enhancement, Ted believes the basic spirit of the endeavor has remained the same:

“One of the things that hasn’t changed is that your ability to get from point A to B on the rails is 100% determined by your own ingenuity and what you bring to the table.”

Abdullah 'would accept' vote defeat

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-02 03:56
Afghan presidential candidate Abdullah Abdullah says he would respect his rival winning, but only if June's vote is proved to have been fair.

Legal action over meningitis death

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-02 03:56
The family of a schoolboy who died from meningitis say they are considering legal action against the hospital, which delayed giving him antibiotics.

VIDEO: Skinner on NHS: Get it done, or get out

BBC - Wed, 2014-07-02 03:55
Dennis Skinner tells the Commons that nurses have lost a "considerable amount" in real pay and A&E departments are "bursting at the seams".
ON THE AIR

KBBI is Powered by Active Listeners like You

As we celebrate 35 years of broadcasting, we look ahead to technology improvements and the changing landscape of public radio.

Support the voices, music, information, and ideas that add so much to your life.Thank you for supporting your local public radio station.

FOLLOW US

Drupal theme by pixeljets.com ver.1.4