National / International News

Council in plea after toddler death

BBC - Tue, 2014-09-09 15:10
A council that was criticised after a toddler died in the care of his drug addict mother wants better funding for child protection services in Scotland.

Are we producing more grads than jobs?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-09-09 15:09

Many jobs that used to require a high school diploma or a certificate now demand a four-year college degree, from executive assistants to registered nurses to construction supervisors. 

That is the finding of a new study from labor market analytics firm Burning Glass Technologies, which sorted through millions of online job postings. Some of those jobs — like nursing or drafting — are more complex than they used to be, says Burning Glass Technologies CEO Matt Sigelman.

“At the same time, we also saw lots and lots of jobs where the jobs haven’t changed,” he says.

For example, about half of IT help desk jobs now require a bachelor’s degree, even though the demands of the job are the same as in positions that don’t ask for a degree, the study found. When it comes to executive secretaries and assistants, 65 percent of listings require a B.A., yet only 19 percent of people in those jobs now have one.

A degree has become a convenient way for employers to sort through hundreds of applicants, Sigelman says. “The problem there is that doesn’t necessarily correspond with what makes people successful in the job,” he says.

And it’s made it harder for the nearly two-thirds of American workers without bachelor’s degrees to find work that pays well. For people with degrees, though, employers are willing to pay more.

“You might think that employers are just hiring degrees because they’re there and they can get them cheap,” says economist Tony Carnevale, director of the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce. “But what the data also shows is that they’re paying for the degrees.”

Even for those with degrees there’s a downside, says Sigelman.

“The bad news is that a lot of the demand is for jobs that you probably didn’t go to college to do,” he says. “If you take on a lot of debt to get a college degree and you wind up working at a job that your parents were able to get without one, then you haven’t really gotten anywhere.”

Are we producing more grads than jobs?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-09-09 15:09

Many jobs that used to require a high school diploma or a certificate now demand a four-year college degree, from executive assistants to registered nurses to construction supervisors. 

 

That is the finding of a new study from labor market analytics firm Burning Glass Technologies, which sorted through millions of online job postings. Some of those jobs — like nursing or drafting — are more complex than they used to be, says Burning Glass Technologies CEO Matt Sigelman.

 

“At the same time, we also saw lots and lots of jobs where the jobs haven’t changed,” he says.

 

For example, about half of IT help desk jobs now require a bachelor’s degree, even though the demands of the job are the same as in positions that don’t ask for a degree, the study found. When it comes to executive secretaries and assistants, 65 percent of listings require a B.A., yet only 19 percent of people in those jobs now have one.

 

A degree has become a convenient way for employers to sort through hundreds of applicants, Sigelman says. “The problem there is that doesn’t necessarily correspond with what makes people successful in the job,” he says.

 

And it’s made it harder for the nearly two-thirds of American workers without bachelor’s degrees to find work that pays well. For people with degrees, though, employers are willing to pay more.

 

“You might think that employers are just hiring degrees because they’re there and they can get them cheap,” says economist Tony Carnevale, director of the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce. “But what the data also shows is that they’re paying for the degrees.”

 

Even for those with degrees there’s a downside, says Sigelman.

 

“The bad news is that a lot of the demand is for jobs that you probably didn’t go to college to do,” he says. “If you take on a lot of debt to get a college degree and you wind up working at a job that your parents were able to get without one, then you haven’t really gotten anywhere.”

 

 

Hiding Steven Sotloff's Jewish roots

BBC - Tue, 2014-09-09 15:04
IS captive's friends' rush to erase his online Jewish identity

VIDEO: 60 years of Guinness World Records

BBC - Tue, 2014-09-09 15:03
The Guinness World Record book celebrates 60 years this year. Here is a look at some of records in the latest edition.

VIDEO: US fears for declining bird numbers

BBC - Tue, 2014-09-09 15:01
The United States puts 230 species of birds on a watch list because of their rapidly declining numbers.

VIDEO: 'We need to look after our clowns'

BBC - Tue, 2014-09-09 15:01
Why being a working clown isn't all laughs

VIDEO: How would 'devo max' affect economy?

BBC - Tue, 2014-09-09 14:44
The governor of the Bank of England has suggested a currency union in the event of Scottish independence would not be possible.

VIDEO: Queen 'won't interfere in Scots poll'

BBC - Tue, 2014-09-09 14:30
Any suggestion that the Queen would wish to influence the Scottish referendum campaign is "categorically wrong", Buckingham Palace has said.

Obama Tells Lawmakers He Has Authority He Needs For Islamic State Fight

NPR News - Tue, 2014-09-09 14:27

The implication is that President Obama will not seek Congressional approval for any military action against the militant Sunni group.

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U2 give away new album on iTunes

BBC - Tue, 2014-09-09 14:26
The first album in five years by veteran Irish rock band U2 is offered for free to the 500 million users of Apple's iTunes service.

Tory MP's website bullying claim

BBC - Tue, 2014-09-09 14:24
Aberconwy MP Guto Bebb claims in the House of Commons the business partner of fellow north Wales Tory David Jones is behind a blog that has "harassed, abused and bullied" people.

Tax Breaks May Turn San Francisco's Vacant Lots Into Urban Farms

NPR News - Tue, 2014-09-09 14:00

San Francisco is one of many U.S. cities rolling out incentives to grow food on unused land. But some San Franciscans argue that land should be used to address the acute affordable housing shortage.

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Love And Sex In The Time Of Viagra — 16 Years On

NPR News - Tue, 2014-09-09 14:00

Longer lives means more decades of intimacy. Drugs that help male physiology match desire have affected more than just the body, men who take these pills say.

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VIDEO: Early hands-on with the Apple Watch

BBC - Tue, 2014-09-09 13:46
Watch: The BBC's Richard Taylor takes a look at Apple's new smartwatch, which was unveiled in California on Tuesday.

VIDEO: Apple unveils Watch and iPhone 6

BBC - Tue, 2014-09-09 13:38
Apple unveils its much anticipated Watch, as well as the latest models of its iPhone at a launch ceremony in California.

Ebola 'threat to Liberia existence'

BBC - Tue, 2014-09-09 13:27
Liberia is facing a "serious threat" to its national existence as the deadly Ebola virus "spreads like wildfire", its defence minister says.

Blast kills Syria Islamist leader

BBC - Tue, 2014-09-09 13:25
The leader and several top commanders of the Syrian Islamist insurgents Ahrar al-Sham are killed in a bomb blast at a meeting.

Andorra 1-2 Wales

BBC - Tue, 2014-09-09 13:17
Gareth Bale scores a late free-kick to ensure Wales beat Andorra in their Euro 2016 qualification opener.

What can retailers do after the Home Depot hack?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-09-09 13:09

Retailers are increasingly seen as vulnerable to hackers. The cyberattack on Home Depot may be the largest data breach in history, and attacks have been made on Neiman Marcus, Target and Goodwill stores, just to name a few.

Remember back in the day when online shopping gave people the jitters? Those days, says Matthew Prince of CloudFlare, are over.

“I feel more safe in putting my credit card into an online form than I do handing it to a waiter at a restaurant,” he says.

Many of us don’t understand, Prince says, that the cash register is more than a point-of-sale device where we swipe our credit card. It is actually a computer.

In this Home Depot attack, and other similar ones, hackers are breaking in to that software system and stealing our credit and debit card information.

Lillian Ablon, a researcher with Rand, says, right now, the attackers are at least one step in front of the merchants.

“We’re in the golden age of cyber where there are still a lot of holes, still a lot of gaps,” she says.

One of the gaping gaps? Our sale information.

Forrester Research analyst John Kindervag says it’s too easy to grab that information when it enters the store computers. There’s a simple fix, though — encryption.

“That technology actually exists off the shelf. It just has to be purchased,” he says.

Of course, the magic word is "purchased."

“Retail is a low-margin, cheap business. So any time they have to spend money, they don’t want to do it,” says Kindervag.

In many cases, stores would need to upgrade hardware and software; for the largest companies, we are talking millions of dollars in equipment investments. 

Kindervag says the other issue is encrypting this data could stifle other lines of business for retailers.

“It will potentially mean they have to do business intelligence and marketing intelligence in totally different ways, and that will be a disruption of their decades-old business model,” he says.

Kindervag predicts retailers would shape up if consumers started shopping with competitors who take data breaches seriously.

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