National / International News

Felipe takes over as Spanish king

BBC - Wed, 2014-06-18 14:41
Felipe VI of Spain accedes to the throne, following the abdication of his father Juan Carlos after a 39-year reign.

VIDEO: Final stretch for German cave rescue

BBC - Wed, 2014-06-18 14:39
A marathon attempt to rescue an injured man from Germany's deepest cave is about to enter its final stretch, officials have said.

VIDEO: Paxman signs off with weather forecast

BBC - Wed, 2014-06-18 14:36
Jeremy Paxman ended his last edition of Newsnight after 25 years at the helm, with a weather forecast.

Warnings Against Antidepressants For Teens May Have Backfired

NPR News - Wed, 2014-06-18 14:34

After the Food and Drug Administration said that antidepressants could spur suicidal thinking in teens, doctors prescribed the drugs less often. The change may have led to more suicides.

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HIA victims 'cannot wait years'

BBC - Wed, 2014-06-18 14:25
The founder of a campaign group says victims "cannot wait" for compensation after a request was made to extend the Historical Institutional Abuse (HIA) inquiry by a year.

Albania battles cannabis growers

BBC - Wed, 2014-06-18 14:09
Albanian police seize more than 10 tonnes of marijuana in a major operation against cannabis growers controlling the southern village of Lazarat.

Why a lot of recalled cars and trucks never get fixed

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-06-18 13:59

If history is any guide, a significant number of the cars GM has recalled this year may never get repaired, because the owners won’t end up bringing them to the shop. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says that only about 75 percent of recalled cars and trucks get fixed.

The used-car company Carfax keeps a database with the VIN number of every car or truck that’s under recall.  “Our data suggests that right now there are at least 36 million cars across the U.S. that have a recall that has not been fixed,” says *Chris Basso from Carfax.  

Older cars are less likely to get brought in, according to research from economist George Hoffer, who has studied the auto industry for decades. He says that’s partly because many are on a second or third owner— who may not be in touch with a dealer. “And, the older the car, probably you’re more fiscally challenged,” he says, “and the last thing you want is for the dealer to start mining for other things and to say, ‘You know, while you’re here, we found this.’”

Also, a lot of recall notices may have gotten tossed out as junk mail. Bill Powers, a roofing contractor from the Chicago suburbs, owns three cars. Asked if any of them had ever been recalled, he paused. “Ooh. I don’t know,” he said, and laughed, shaking his head. “I guess I should probably know if they’ve had recalls, right?”

Does he ever get mail from his car dealer he doesn’t open?  “Yeah, quite a bit.”  More rueful laughter.

In February, hoping to improve on that 75 percent rate for repairs, NHTSA required carmakers to add a big label to recall notices. It looks like this:

But that rate doesn’t sound so bad compared to recalled child car seats. According to NHTSA, just 30 percent of those get repaired.

*CORRECTION: An earlier version of this story misidentified the company that provides repair histories on used cars. The company is Carfax. The article has been corrected.

Yes, the Redskins can still sell Redskins gear

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-06-18 13:59

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has ruled that the Washington Redskins trademark cannot be registered because it disparages Native Americans.

But the decision is expected to have a limited financial impact: The team can still sell Redskins merchandise.

The ruling makes it harder to defend against counterfeit imports from abroad -- but it’s not like the team is suddenly very vulnerable.

“Generally speaking, if someone is selling counterfeit Redskins gear, Redskins would still be able to go to court to shut them down,” says UCLA law professor Eugene Volokh.

Team owner Daniel Snyder has resisted pressure to change the Redskin’s name. Even though a name-change would mess with traditions, it could also inspire die-hard fans to go out and spend money on new T-shirts, caps or coffee mugs.

“It would be a financial windfall for the team from a marketing standpoint,” says Dan Bruton, a sports marketing professor at San Diego State University.

But the Redskins don't appear any closer to changing the name.

In a written statement, the team’s lawyer says the Redskins plan to appeal the trademark decision.

National Data Confirm Cases Of Restraint And Seclusion In Public Schools

NPR News - Wed, 2014-06-18 13:59

A controversial practice to tie, hold down or seclude agitated students mostly impacts kids with disabilities. Schools say it's for safety, but opponents say it's dangerous and a civil rights issue.

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England will attack Uruguay - Hodgson

BBC - Wed, 2014-06-18 13:57
Roy Hodgson says England will attack Uruguay in Thursday's crucial group game even though defeat could send them out.

What does the Majority Leader do? Brings in the cash

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-06-18 13:57

House Republicans are electing a new majority leader Thursday. What exactly does the majority leader do? Job number one: Keep the majority. To do that you need money. Lots of it. 

“The majority leader has the dirty work,” says Paul Light, professor of public policy at NYU. 

He estimates that House majority leaders spend about 30 percent of their time raising money, but it’s not just fundraising. They also have to man the firehose of campaign cash that’s gushing in.

“There is so much money," Light explains. "The majority leader has to work to see whether it can get deployed to places where it’s needed.”

Republican Kevin McCarthy of California is expected to win the House majority leader vote. He’s already raised a lot of money for other Republican House members, whose votes he'll be counting on.

“Just like the godfather did, you call on your beneficiaries to give you a service, and in this case the service is supporting him for majority leader, ” says Jack Pitney, who teaches government at Claremont McKenna College.

Of course, Democrats do this too. But it wasn’t always this intense; the money race got tougher after Republicans took control of the House after the 1994 elections, ending decades of Democratic control. Dan Glickman of Kansas was one of the Democrats voted out that year. He says now that the House is in play, you need more money to stay in control.

“I think the competitive nature of the House certainly ups the ante,” he says.

Glickman says it ups the ante for the minority leader as well, who’s also out raising money to try to reclaim control of the House. 

Smartphones: nuisance or teaching tool?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-06-18 13:53

Teachers are kind of  like parents, sometimes. You push them long enough and they come around. Or sometimes, they just get tired of fighting.

Project Tomorrow, a non-profit education group, surveyed thousands of teachers, librarians and district officials in 2010, to gauge their attitudes about mobile devices in the classroom.  Sixty-three percent said they weren’t likely to allow students to use them anytime soon; 22 percent said it was likely they would allow mobile devices in class soon, and three percent said their students were already using them in the classroom.

Fast forward to 2013. Fifty-one percent said either they were already allowing mobile devices, or would likely be allowing them in the classroom.  That compares to 32 percent, who said it was unlikely they would allow phones, tablets and the rest into classrooms.

Our own unscientific survey of classroom-tech policies,  found that teachers have lots concerns about mobile devices, particularly smartphones.  Teachers worried about students being distracted, cheating on tests and more.  Even teachers who use laptops or tablets in class said smart phone use is a big problem.  

Tom Odendahl, an economics and history teacher at a Minneapolis high school, wrote that he has agreed to let some students use laptops and tablets, but can't imagine how a smartphone could be put to good use:

As I write I can envision ways to use devices, but I keep coming up against the reality of how my students use cell phones, and it is not for clarifying questions, or fact-checking my often absurd pronouncements. One popular service I have witnessed during class is shopping for prom dresses.

At the same time,  quite a few teachers said they have have started to allow smart phone use in the class.  Paul Isom is a professor at North Carolina University.

I find students generally use them appropriately, rarely perusing facebook, instagram, etc (except during breaks), and often using them to find answers to questions that come up in class. In more than one case, they've proven very helpful when a question arises. Anyway, to fight the students over laptops/phones/tablets would be tilting at windmills.

 Pam Pailes, the Dean of Students at Flour Bluff High School in Corpus Christi, Texas, is among those who will make the transition iin the fall.  Her school will switch to a "BYOD" (bring-your-own-device) policy.  Pailes says there’s more upside than downside:

In a traditional classroom, we are asking them to learn in a way that seems stodgy and boring to many young people. In their minds, they can learn so much more if they could just "find it on the internet." Allowing laptops, tablets, phones, etc., into the classroom allows us to educate students to be better cyber-citizens and helps us teach them to use the information available on the web in a balanced and appropriately skeptical.

Smartphone: nuisance or teaching tool?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-06-18 13:53

Teachers are kind of  like parents, sometimes. You push them long enough and they come around. Or sometimes, they just get tired of fighting.

Project Tomorrow, a non-profit education group, surveyed thousands of teachers, librarians and district officials in 2010, to gauge their attitudes about mobile devices in the classroom.  Sixty-three percent said they weren’t likely to allow students to use them anytime soon; 22 percent said it was likely they would allow mobile devices in class soon, and three percent said their students were already using them in the classroom.

Fast forward to 2013. Fifty-one percent said either they were already allowing mobile devices, or would likely be allowing them in the classroom.  That compares to 32 percent, who said it was unlikely they would allow phones, tablets and the rest into classrooms.

Our own unscientific survey of classroom-tech policies,  found that teachers have lots concerns about mobile devices, particularly smartphones.  Teachers worried about students being distracted, cheating on tests and more.  Even teachers who use laptops or tablets in class said smart phone use is a big problem.  

Tom Odendahl, an economics and history teacher at a Minneapolis high school, wrote that he has agreed to let some students use laptops and tablets, but can't imagine how a smartphone could be put to good use:

As I write I can envision ways to use devices, but I keep coming up against the reality of how my students use cell phones, and it is not for clarifying questions, or fact-checking my often absurd pronouncements. One popular service I have witnessed during class is shopping for prom dresses.

At the same time,  quite a few teachers said they have have started to allow smart phone use in the class.  Paul Isom is a professor at North Carolina University.

I find students generally use them appropriately, rarely perusing facebook, instagram, etc (except during breaks), and often using them to find answers to questions that come up in class. In more than one case, they've proven very helpful when a question arises. Anyway, to fight the students over laptops/phones/tablets would be tilting at windmills.

 Pam Pailes, the Dean of Students at Flour Bluff High School in Corpus Christi, Texas, is among those who will make the transition iin the fall.  Her school will switch to a "BYOD" (bring-your-own-device) policy.  Pailes says there’s more upside than downside:

In a traditional classroom, we are asking them to learn in a way that seems stodgy and boring to many young people. In their minds, they can learn so much more if they could just "find it on the internet." Allowing laptops, tablets, phones, etc., into the classroom allows us to educate students to be better cyber-citizens and helps us teach them to use the information available on the web in a balanced and appropriately skeptical.

VIDEO: Yuan deal of 'critical importance'

BBC - Wed, 2014-06-18 13:51
The boss of China's CCB bank, Wang Hongzhang, says an agreement with the Bank of England to become the London renminbi clearing house is of "critical importance".

AT & T and Udacity partner up on a degree

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-06-18 13:51
<a href="http://marketplaceapm.polldaddy.com/s/tech-degrees">View Survey</a>

May 'sorry' over passport delays

BBC - Wed, 2014-06-18 13:50
Theresa May apologises for delays in passport applications, saying the government is dealing with the problem.

World Cup: Spain 0-2 Chile

BBC - Wed, 2014-06-18 13:46
Holders Spain are knocked out of the World Cup as Chile consign them to a second straight defeat in Group B.

VIDEO: Iraqi cleric warns of 'threat to peace'

BBC - Wed, 2014-06-18 13:45
The BBC's John Simpson has spoken exclusively to Sheikh Abdul Mahdi Karbalai, a representative of Iraq's most senior Shia religious leader, Grand Ayatollah Ali Sistani,

VIDEO: Two UK extremists flee to Syria

BBC - Wed, 2014-06-18 13:43
Two known extremists who were under criminal investigation have fled the UK for Syria, the BBC reveals.
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