National / International News

2-2 game 'most viewed in US history'

BBC - Tue, 2014-06-24 09:57
The World Cup match between USA and Portugal on Sunday, which finished with high drama, was the most viewed football game in US history, provisional figures suggest.

Andy Coulson guilty of phone hacking

BBC - Tue, 2014-06-24 09:51
Former News of the World editor Andy Coulson is found guilty of conspiring to hack phones while ex-News International chief executive Rebekah Brooks is cleared of all charges.

Tributes to dead 'white collar' boxer

BBC - Tue, 2014-06-24 09:43
Tributes are paid to a man who died following a "white collar" boxing match at a nightclub in Nottingham.

Never Too Young: Pediatricians Say Parents Should Read To Infants

NPR News - Tue, 2014-06-24 09:29

Parents have been told they should read to their children early, but most don't think that means the day you bring Junior home from the hospital. Pediatricians say start now to help learning later.

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FBI Says It Freed 168 U.S. Children In Sex-Trafficking Raids

NPR News - Tue, 2014-06-24 09:22

The authorities rounded up 281 pimps last week, as police targeted child sex-trafficking operations in more than 100 U.S. cities.

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Tuesday's gossip column

BBC - Tue, 2014-06-24 09:19
Yaya Toure criticises Man City again, Arsenal hold talks with Alexis Sanchez, Rio Ferdinand in line for QPR move, plus more.

On Capitol Hill, A Debate Over What's Driving Central American Exodus

NPR News - Tue, 2014-06-24 09:17

Republicans blamed the Obama administration's messaging, while Democrats blamed messaging by smugglers and the violence sparked by drug cartels in Central America.

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VIDEO: Boy takes 'selfie' with the Queen

BBC - Tue, 2014-06-24 09:08
The Queen has been photographed in the background as a boy takes a selfie at St George's Market

Sky cars to be built in Tel Aviv

BBC - Tue, 2014-06-24 09:08
A futuristic network of cars that will travel through the sky above Tel Aviv is to be built in Israel.

'Tis the season for mangos

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-06-24 09:06

From the Marketplace Datebook, here's a look at what's coming up Wednesday, June 25:

Are folks prepping for summer? The Commerce Department reports on durable goods orders for May. Stuff like lawn and garden equipment. Or a computer for you indoor types.

The Commerce Department also releases its final estimate for first-quarter gross domestic product.

The House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology discusses the future of human space exploration.

Ever wonder how to cut a mango? It's time to learn a new skill. The folks at the National Mango Board provide tips. They make it look easy. June is National Mango Month.

And the annual Smithsonian Folklife Festival opens on the National Mall in Washington.

Police college plan 'to go ahead'

BBC - Tue, 2014-06-24 09:02
A team in charge of plans to build a new training college for the police and other emergency services at Desertcreat near Cookstown will recommend that the project continues.

McCausland drops out of tourism job

BBC - Tue, 2014-06-24 09:01
Former Assistant Chief Constable Duncan McCausland had been expected to be appointed chairman of the Northern Ireland Tourist Board, the BBC learns.

Royal couple visit Belfast film set

BBC - Tue, 2014-06-24 09:01
The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh meet cast and production members from Game of Thrones during a tour of the Paint Hall Studios in Belfast on the second day of their Northern Ireland visit.

Federer & Nadal into second round

BBC - Tue, 2014-06-24 08:40
Seven-time champion Roger Federer and number two seed Rafael Nadal both win their first-round matches.

Fault in Our Stars tops UK chart

BBC - Tue, 2014-06-24 08:32
Teen cancer drama The Fault in Our Stars comfortably tops the UK and Ireland box office in its opening weekend, taking £3.4m.

'Shameful' Verdict Exposes Egyptian Journalists' Fears

NPR News - Tue, 2014-06-24 08:32

A judge sentenced three Al Jazeera journalists to prison on charges of reporting false news. Two Egyptian journalists explain the challenges of reporting in a tense political environment.

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Corporate boards mostly a boys-only club

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-06-24 08:27

When Google released employees’ demographic data recently, it revealed just how white and male the tech company is. On the other hand, Google has something a lot of companies don’t: three women on its 10-person board.

Research has been mounting for a while that board diversity actually makes a difference to corporations’ bottom lines. Still, most firms aren’t in any rush to change the status quo. One recent study says parity in the boardroom will arrive in 2042.

Malli Gero hopes it will come a lot faster. For the last few years, she’s been keeping tabs on how many female board members companies have. Gero is co-founder of the nonprofit 2020 Women on Boards. She says some top companies have women in 20 percent or more of board seats. But most are far below that number. She says the most successful companies can afford to hire search firms to find good female candidates, but others turn to their existing network.

“Most of the male CEOs know men like themselves, and those are the people they rely on,” Gero says.

And that’s how the cycle of men on boards continues.

It’s a cycle large investment funds like Calpers are trying to break.

Anne Simpson is senior portfolio manager at Calpers, California’s employee pension fund. This spring, it worked with a few other large funds to bring a shareholder resolution against Urban Outfitters. Calpers pressed the fashion retailer to put more women and minorities in its boardroom. Urban Outfitters’ main market? Young women. 

“Until last year this was a company that had an all-male board, mostly over 60 years old,” says Simpson. “And for us, this really isn’t a board which has the range of diverse experience and talent to really secure the company for the long term.”

Last year, after a previous shareholder resolution, Urban Outfitters agreed to put a woman on its board. Simpson says initially fund managers were delighted. Then they discovered Urban Outfitters had chosen the wife of its CEO, herself a fashion executive. The company, she says, made no effort to look further afield.

Technology executive Heidi Roizen is trying to encourage companies to do just that. Whenever she hears a CEO say he can’t find any good women, she whips out her list of qualified candidates. 

“I joke about having binders of women,” says Roizen. “I have more binders of women than Mitt Romney.” 

Roizen is a partner at Silicon Valley venture capital firm DFJ. She has served on more than 30 boards during the last two decades. And it can be a little lonely. She’s on several boards at the moment, including Tivo’s, and she’s the only woman on most of them.

It’s not surprising she’s in such demand. A recent study found women and minorities are far likelier than white men to be on lots of boards at once. 

Anne Simpson of Calpers says that’s because companies are still nervous about working with lesser-known candidates. They stick with women they know are good. Calpers wants companies to limit the time board members can spend on the job so new people have a chance to step in. Otherwise, Simpson says, “We won’t achieve diversity in my lifetime.”

As for Calpers’ effort to get Urban Outfitters to put more women and minorities on the board -- it failed. Most shareholders voted no. Malli Gero says shareholders worry about rocking the boat. But she says there’s another reason things don’t change: apathy.

“Most stockholders don’t even vote their proxies,” she says. “In fact they don’t even open those envelopes to look at the board compositions or to see what resolutions are up and need voting on.”

Gero says if you care about who is making the decisions at companies you have a stake in – the first step is to open that envelope. Then vote.

Ashley Milne-Tyte is the host of a podcast on women and the workplace called The Broad Experience.

Corporate boards still disproportionately male

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-06-24 08:27

When Google released employees’ demographic data recently, it revealed just how white and male the tech company is. On the other hand, Google has something a lot of companies don’t: three women on its 10-person board.

Research has been mounting for a while that board diversity actually makes a difference to corporations’ bottom lines. Still, most firms aren’t in any rush to change the status quo. One recent study says parity in the boardroom will arrive in 2042.

Malli Gero hopes it will come a lot faster. For the last few years, she’s been keeping tabs on how many female board members companies have. Gero is co-founder of the nonprofit 2020 Women on Boards. She says some top companies have women in 20 percent or more of board seats. But most are far below that number. She says the most successful companies can afford to hire search firms to find good female candidates, but others turn to their existing network.

“Most of the male CEOs know men like themselves, and those are the people they rely on,” Gero says.

And that’s how the cycle of men on boards continues.

It’s a cycle large investment funds like Calpers are trying to break.

Anne Simpson is senior portfolio manager at Calpers, California’s employee pension fund. This spring, it worked with a few other large funds to bring a shareholder resolution against Urban Outfitters. Calpers pressed the fashion retailer to put more women and minorities in its boardroom. Urban Outfitters’ main market? Young women. 

“Until last year this was a company that had an all-male board, mostly over 60 years old,” says Simpson. “And for us, this really isn’t a board which has the range of diverse experience and talent to really secure the company for the long term.”

Last year, after a previous shareholder resolution, Urban Outfitters agreed to put a woman on its board. Simpson says initially fund managers were delighted. Then they discovered Urban Outfitters had chosen the wife of its CEO, herself a fashion executive. The company, she says, made no effort to look further afield.

Technology executive Heidi Roizen is trying to encourage companies to do just that. Whenever she hears a CEO say he can’t find any good women, she whips out her list of qualified candidates. 

“I joke about having binders of women,” says Roizen. “I have more binders of women than Mitt Romney.” 

Roizen is a partner at Silicon Valley venture capital firm DFJ. She has served on more than 30 boards during the last two decades. And it can be a little lonely. She’s on several boards at the moment, including Tivo’s, and she’s the only woman on most of them.

It’s not surprising she’s in such demand. A recent study found women and minorities are far likelier than white men to be on lots of boards at once. 

Anne Simpson of Calpers says that’s because companies are still nervous about working with lesser-known candidates. They stick with women they know are good. Calpers wants companies to limit the time board members can spend on the job so new people have a chance to step in. Otherwise, Simpson says, “We won’t achieve diversity in my lifetime.”

As for Calpers’ effort to get Urban Outfitters to put more women and minorities on the board -- it failed. Most shareholders voted no. Malli Gero says shareholders worry about rocking the boat. But she says there’s another reason things don’t change: apathy.

“Most stockholders don’t even vote their proxies,” she says. “In fact they don’t even open those envelopes to look at the board compositions or to see what resolutions are up and need voting on.”

Gero says if you care about who is making the decisions at companies you have a stake in – the first step is to open that envelope. Then vote.

Ashley Milne-Tyte is the host of a podcast on women and the workplace called The Broad Experience.

How to get a job on LinkedIn

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-06-24 08:23

Here's how LinkedIn says to use its site to get a job - tips straight from the source:

  1. Profile picture: A profile photo is key. In fact, adding a profile picture makes your profile 11 times more likely to be viewed.
  2. Endorsements: Add skills that your connections can endorse you for and recognize those you’ve worked with on their professional skills. There are over 3 billion endorsements given to date.
  3. Summary: Adding a summary of 40 words or more makes your profile more likely to turn up in a future employer’s search. A good tip is to ensure your summary includes keywords featured in desirable job descriptions for your field.
  4. Experience: It’s essential to list all past experience that may reflect your ability to execute and problem solve. In fact, your profile is 12 times more likely to be viewed if you have more than 1 position listed. Illustrate your unique professional story and achievements by adding visuals like pictures, compelling videos and innovative presentations to your experience section. Other members can even like or comment on what you’ve posted.
  5. Volunteer Experience & Causes: Adding causes and volunteer experience is a great way to round out your professional identity. Almost half (42%) of all hiring managers say they view volunteer experience as equivalent to formal work experience.

 

Two more arrests over patient death

BBC - Tue, 2014-06-24 08:18
Two more people are arrested after the death of an 88-year-old patient who was found with "serious and unexplained" injuries at a south Wales hospital.
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