National / International News

VIDEO: Kidnap victim 'so happy to see family'

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-22 01:11
A 25-year-old woman who went missing 10 years ago in California has spoken of her joy at being reunited with her family.

'How I made my first billion'

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-22 01:03
How a market trader became a billionaire

Your pictures: Squares

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-22 00:59
Readers' photos on the theme of "squares"

Tony Abbott says wink was 'mistake'

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-22 00:58
Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott says it was "regrettable" that he winked and smiled during a chat with a distressed voter.

Burner's £33m penalty plea rejected

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-22 00:52
A council is refused government help with a £33.7m penalty for cancelling the contract to build a controversial £500m waste incinerator.

VIDEO: Wild beavers 'destroy flood defences'

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-22 00:48
Wild beavers are making a return to several Perthshire rivers - delighting conservationists but upsetting some farmers.

NI electorate goes to the polls

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-22 00:22
Northern Ireland voters go to the polls on Thursday to decide who they want to represent them in the European parliament and on 11 new district councils.

VIDEO: Cheap chargers putting people at risk

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-22 00:21
The biggest risk posed by chargers is the availability of cheap generic options online according to fire and safety experts

Comet-chaser completes 'big burn'

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-22 00:08
Europe's Rosetta spacecraft takes a big step towards making its historic rendezvous with Comet 67P/C-G in August following a major orbit manoeuvre.

Terror inmates 'accused of bullying'

BBC - Thu, 2014-05-22 00:02
Some Muslim prisoners convicted of terrorist offences, and gang leaders, described as "very dangerous men", are accused of bullying at a Cambridgeshire jail.

Dentist, mechanic... security expert?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-05-21 23:58

When I was interviewing Anup Ghosh for today's roundup of hacking news, he expressed a setniment all too familiar.

"Never a dull day in the security world," he said. And it's true -- this week, we've learned about an Ebay data breach impacting 145 million users, a member of the Navy stealing identities of fellow servicemen from inside an aircraft carrier and a government report that suggests attacking public utilities connected to the Internet is as easy as Googling. That's just this week.

I can say "Target hack" and you know exactly what I'm talking about, right? The truth is that hacking -- the bad kind -- is becoming a regular part of our lives whether we're "into tech" or not. But here's a question I keep coming back to: how do we know the difference between a run-of-the-mill hack job, and a Heartbleed bug?

When I interviewed Brian Krebs last month about Heartbleed on one of the first days it was a story, his advice was "stay off the Internet." No modifiers, no caveats, just one simple sentence.

At that moment Krebs's statement felt like hyperbole, but as the days wore on, the emails from companies and social networks started piling up in inboxes. We talked to people who were actually trying to patch the security holes left open by Heartbleed, and they were barely sleeping. Heartbleed seemed to prove just as serious as Krebs had suggested. But it was also hard to tell what the impact really was. When there's smoke there's fire. But where there's just a ton of kindling and a book of matches... there's... ?

Hacking, as an idea, is really hard to get your head around. It's not as palpable as other kinds of threats. You might suffer from it, but you can't really see it. It's not an explosion, and you need some pretty legitimate tech creds to know how it actually works. In fact, the thing that worries me is that the vast majority of people who interact with technology every day -- and this includes me -- have a pretty simplistic understanding of how it all really works.

We're total noobs, to use the online parlance of our times. So the majority of us have to rely on obvious signs or people who know more than us if we want to identify it and calculate where a hack falls on the threat spectrum.

It's like going to a mechanic or the dentist. You have to trust someone who knows way more than you. And to be honest, I'm not entirely comfortable with that.

I've had dentists who I know attempted to get me to pay for their X-ray machine by telling me to get an X-ray every time I came in for a cleaning. And I don't think it's a stretch to suggest that if we came up with perfect security tools, a lot of cybersecurity companies would go out of business. That's a cynical idea that doesn't take into account the simple fact that most competing cybersecurity companies are trying to build the perfect cybersecurity tools so that all the other companies go out of business.

But it's a factor.

All this reminds me of another quote. It comes from cybersecurity expert at Sophos and Marketplace Tech regular Chester Wisniewski. A funny saying in the cybersecurity world, says Chester, is that "there's no patch for human stupidity." As in, people are fallible. They make mistakes no matter how powerful your security software is. And that might be a place to start from for us regulars, us noobs. To acknowledge how little we know, and promise to learn more about the technology we use, in the hope of protecting ourselves. Because hacking is here to stay.

Dentist, mechanic... security expert?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-05-21 23:58

When I was interviewing Anup Ghosh for today's roundup of hacking news, he expressed a setniment all too familiar.

"Never a dull day in the security world," he said. And it's true -- this week, we've learned about an Ebay data breach impacting 145 million users, a member of the Navy stealing identities of fellow servicemen from inside an aircraft carrier and a government report that suggests attacking public utilities connected to the Internet is as easy as Googling. That's just this week.

I can say "Target hack" and you know exactly what I'm talking about, right? The truth is that hacking -- the bad kind -- is becoming a regular part of our lives whether we're "into tech" or not. But here's a question I keep coming back to: how do we know the difference between a run-of-the-mill hack job, and a Heartbleed bug?

When I interviewed Brian Krebs last month about Heartbleed on one of the first days it was a story, his advice was "stay off the Internet." No modifiers, no caveats, just one simple sentence.

At that moment Krebs's statement felt like hyperbole, but as the days wore on, the emails from companies and social networks started piling up in inboxes. We talked to people who were actually trying to patch the security holes left open by Heartbleed, and they were barely sleeping. Heartbleed seemed to prove just as serious as Krebs had suggested. But it was also hard to tell what the impact really was. When there's smoke there's fire. But where there's just a ton of kindling and a book of matches... there's... ?

Hacking, as an idea, is really hard to get your head around. It's not as palpable as other kinds of threats. You might suffer from it, but you can't really see it. It's not an explosion, and you need some pretty legitimate tech creds to know how it actually works. In fact, the thing that worries me is that the vast majority of people who interact with technology every day -- and this includes me -- have a pretty simplistic understanding of how it all really works.

We're total noobs, to use the online parlance of our times. So the majority of us have to rely on obvious signs or people who know more than us if we want to identify it and calculate where a hack falls on the threat spectrum.

It's like going to a mechanic or the dentist. You have to trust someone who knows way more than you. And to be honest, I'm not entirely comfortable with that.

I've had dentists who I know attempted to get me to pay for their X-ray machine by telling me to get an X-ray every time I came in for a cleaning. And I don't think it's a stretch to suggest that if we came up with perfect security tools, a lot of cybersecurity companies would go out of business. That's a cynical idea that doesn't take into account the simple fact that most competing cybersecurity companies are trying to build the perfect cybersecurity tools so that all the other companies go out of business.

But it's a factor.

All this reminds me of another quote. It comes from cybersecurity expert at Sophos and Marketplace Tech regular Chester Wisniewski. A funny saying in the cybersecurity world, says Chester, is that "there's no patch for human stupidity." As in, people are fallible. They make mistakes no matter how powerful your security software is. And that might be a place to start from for us regulars, us noobs. To acknowledge how little we know, and promise to learn more about the technology we use, in the hope of protecting ourselves. Because hacking is here to stay.

Stones manager Loewenstein dies

BBC - Wed, 2014-05-21 23:58
Prince Rupert Loewenstein, the Bavarian banker credited with turning the Rolling Stones into the world's richest rock band, has died at 80

Marketplace Bombing Kills 31 In Far Western China

NPR News - Wed, 2014-05-21 23:42

The attack in China's volatile northwestern region of Xinjiang on Thursday was the bloodiest in a series of violent incidents that Chinese authorities have blamed on radical separatist Muslim Uighurs.

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Albuquerque Police Face Federal Scrutiny, Local Outrage

NPR News - Wed, 2014-05-21 23:31

Police in Albuquerque, N.M., have shown a pattern of excessive force that violates the Constitution, a federal report says. The department is changing policies; families are demanding accountability.

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Former Obama Campaigner Tries Running For Himself In Iowa

NPR News - Wed, 2014-05-21 23:30

Brad Anderson helped the president in Iowa in 2008 and 2012, but he's never campaigned on his own behalf. He cites Obama as an inspiration, but others might not be as quick to start their own races.

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In A Coal Town Where Jobs Are Few, Wild Ramps Are Plenty

NPR News - Wed, 2014-05-21 23:29

The annual Ramp Feed, which celebrates the ramp, or wild leek, gives the economically depressed mining town of Richwood, W.Va., a reason to celebrate. And you can smell those alliums for miles.

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VIDEO: Khodorkovsky warns on Russia sanctions

BBC - Wed, 2014-05-21 23:21
Former Russian oil tycoon Mikhail Khodorkovsky has warned against further sanctions on Moscow for its role in Ukraine's current crisis

Five bailed in Syria charity probe

BBC - Wed, 2014-05-21 23:00
Five men arrested in West and South Yorkshire by anti-terror police investigating suspected fraud by a Syrian aid charity, are bailed.

Toure wants Man City 'job for life'

BBC - Wed, 2014-05-21 22:43
Manchester City midfielder Yaya Toure wants assurances he will stay at the club for as long as possible, says his agent.
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