National / International News

Large crowds welcome baton relay

BBC - Tue, 2014-05-27 10:21
The Queen's Baton Relay has seen its biggest crowds so far on its journey around Wales as thousands of people welcomed it to Carmarthenshire.

The house call makes a comeback

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-05-27 10:16

Back in the day, doctors made house calls and actually got to know their patients. But as times and technology changed, a home visit from your doctor became a luxury for the 1 percent. Dissatisfied doctors and frustrated patients have forced the industry to adjust, and house call doctors are making a comeback. But are they for everyone?

Patients want that personal relationship as well. People who grew up with house call doctor visits remember them fondly.

Dr. Michael Farzam is CEO of House Call Doctor Los Angeles. He's been seeing patients in their homes for 13 years, and almost never has to make a referral. Part of the reason is he speaks with patients on the phone before making the trek in LA traffic to their home, but also, he says, "I can do everything in the home, essentially, a doctor's office or a typical urgent care can do. So, we do x-rays and ultrasounds, we administer IV fluids."

And there are advantages to seeing patients in their homes. Some cases can only be solved by a home visit, like the time he diagnosed a whole family with carbon monoxide poisoning from an old furnace.

"It's just something you had to see visually in the home to be able to make that diagnosis. You know, if they had been in the house one more night, they probably all would have died. And that was a nice day. That makes the job very worthwhile."

During our interview, Dr. Farzam took several calls from patients on his cell phone. It's this personal care and the access his patients have that make them so satisfied. But this kind of service must be for the super-wealthy. Right? At around $400 a visit, Dr. Farzam says he does see the 1 percent here in LA – corporate executives and celebrities who want the privacy and convenience. 

However: "But I'd say 95 percent of my patients are middle income people, who hold average jobs, and any way you look at it, our fee is less expensive than an emergency room visit, even if you have good insurance."

The tech startup Medicast uses a house call model they call "Uber for healthcare". Patients can hail a doctor 24/7 from a mobile app.

"It's really as simple as just clicking a button when you're not feeling well,” CEO Sam Zebarjadi says, “and we find a nearby on-call doctor who will come to your home, your office or hotel in under two hours."

Patients can also summon a doctor from their website or by calling in to the call center. Medicast has been up and running in Miami and South Florida for almost a year and it launches in Los Angeles and Orange Counties in the beginning of June.

Of course, there was a reason house calls all but disappeared in the middle of last century. Medicine became more expensive, having medical insurance became necessary, and dealing with that ate into doctors' profits.

"About 60 to 70 percent of the costs of healthcare are really in the overhead that come with traditional practices," Zebarjadi says -- and to make up for all that overhead, doctors might have to see 30 patients a day. "They spend about 6-8 minutes per patient…so it's a very stressful experience."

The Medicast model is a twist on a relatively new trend. It's called private medicine and it's growing by 25 percent a year. The idea is to eliminate some of the costs associated with billing insurance. That way, doctors can afford to spend more time with patients. These house call practices are a cash business – they don't take insurance. They also don't need nurses, receptionists… they don't even need the office.

But still, these are doctors driving to your homes. How do the non-millionaire patients afford that? Zebarjadi says people are saving money on insurance by choosing policies with high deductibles.

"A lot of people are using healthcare for catastrophic events and actually looking elsewhere to services like ours for basic wellness and urgent care needs."

So when you go to sleep with a high deductible insurance plan and wake up in the middle of the night with an alarming fever, you're faced with a choice: a potential $3,000 in the Emergency Room, or $400 or so for a home visit. That house call might just be the frugal choice, as well as a lot more restful.

House call doctors make a comeback

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-05-27 10:16

Back in the day, doctors made house calls and actually got to know their patients. But as times and technology changed, a home visit from your doctor became a luxury for the 1 percent. Dissatisfied doctors and frustrated patients have forced the industry to adjust, and house call doctors are making a comeback. But are they for everyone?

Patients want that personal relationship as well. People who grew up with house call doctor visits remember them fondly.

Dr. Michael Farzam is CEO of House Call Doctor Los Angeles. He's been seeing patients in their homes for 13 years, and almost never has to make a referral. Part of the reason is he speaks with patients on the phone before making the trek in LA traffic to their home, but also, he says, "I can do everything in the home, essentially, a doctor's office or a typical urgent care can do. So, we do x-rays and ultrasounds, we administer IV fluids."

And there are advantages to seeing patients in their homes. Some cases can only be solved by a home visit, like the time he diagnosed a whole family with carbon monoxide poisoning from an old furnace.

"It's just something you had to see visually in the home to be able to make that diagnosis. You know, if they had been in the house one more night, they probably all would have died. And that was a nice day. That makes the job very worthwhile."

During our interview, Dr. Farzam took several calls from patients on his cell phone. It's this personal care and the access his patients have that make them so satisfied. But this kind of service must be for the super-wealthy. Right? At around $400 a visit, Dr. Farzam says he does see the 1 percent here in LA – corporate executives and celebrities who want the privacy and convenience. 

However: "But I'd say 95 percent of my patients are middle income people, who hold average jobs, and any way you look at it, our fee is less expensive than an emergency room visit, even if you have good insurance."

The tech startup Medicast uses a house call model they call "Uber for healthcare". Patients can hail a doctor 24/7 from a mobile app.

"It's really as simple as just clicking a button when you're not feeling well,” CEO Sam Zebarjadi says, “and we find a nearby on-call doctor who will come to your home, your office or hotel in under two hours."

Patients can also summon a doctor from their website or by calling in to the call center. Medicast has been up and running in Miami and South Florida for almost a year and it launches in Los Angeles and Orange Counties in the beginning of June.

Of course, there was a reason house calls all but disappeared in the middle of last century. Medicine became more expensive, having medical insurance became necessary, and dealing with that ate into doctors' profits.

"About 60 to 70 percent of the costs of healthcare are really in the overhead that come with traditional practices," Zebarjadi says -- and to make up for all that overhead, doctors might have to see 30 patients a day. "They spend about 6-8 minutes per patient…so it's a very stressful experience."

The Medicast model is a twist on a relatively new trend. It's called private medicine and it's growing by 25 percent a year. The idea is to eliminate some of the costs associated with billing insurance. That way, doctors can afford to spend more time with patients. These house call practices are a cash business – they don't take insurance. They also don't need nurses, receptionists… they don't even need the office.

But still, these are doctors driving to your homes. How do the non-millionaire patients afford that? Zebarjadi says people are saving money on insurance by choosing policies with high deductibles.

"A lot of people are using healthcare for catastrophic events and actually looking elsewhere to services like ours for basic wellness and urgent care needs."

So when you go to sleep with a high deductible insurance plan and wake up in the middle of the night with an alarming fever, you're faced with a choice: a potential $3,000 in the Emergency Room, or $400 or so for a home visit. That house call might just be the frugal choice, as well as a lot more restful.

Pakistani Woman Stoned To Death By Family Outside Courtroom

NPR News - Tue, 2014-05-27 10:14

The 25-year-old woman, who was three months pregnant, was bludgeoned to death with bricks after she married someone against her family's will.

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Tunisia’s rubbish selfie trend

BBC - Tue, 2014-05-27 10:04
The battle of the bins causing a stink in Tunisia

Financial help available in church

BBC - Tue, 2014-05-27 10:01
The Church of England is launching a new scheme to promote responsible lending, which will see people being given financial advice in church.

LG unveils laser-focus smartphone

BBC - Tue, 2014-05-27 09:58
LG unveils the first smartphone to use a laser beam to help it focus in dim light conditions and to lock onto fast-moving objects.

VIDEO: Rolf Harris gives evidence in court

BBC - Tue, 2014-05-27 09:49
TV entertainer Rolf Harris has denied a string of allegations that he indecently assaulted four girls, including a friend of his daughter.

Cable condemns peer over Clegg poll

BBC - Tue, 2014-05-27 09:49
Vince Cable says a opinion poll commissioned by a Lib Dem peer into Nick Clegg's electoral appeal was "totally inexcusable".

Asbestos removal firm fined £109,000

BBC - Tue, 2014-05-27 09:43
An asbestos removal company is fined £109,000 for exposing workers to dangerous fibres during demolition of a former school building.

Ukraine army recaptures airport

BBC - Tue, 2014-05-27 09:38
Ukraine's army has recaptured Donetsk airport, the interior ministry says, as pro-Russia separatists report at least 30 of their fighters killed.

Bill Murray Offers Bachelor Party Advice On Love And Life

NPR News - Tue, 2014-05-27 09:36

At a South Carolina steakhouse over Memorial Day weekend, the comic actor told friends of a groom that if they find love themselves, they should test it by going on a trip around the world.

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When Older People Walk Now, They Stay Independent Later

NPR News - Tue, 2014-05-27 09:36

Nobody wants to spend their final years unable to walk, but that sad fate afflicts many people as they age. A little exercise helps a lot, especially if people can do it in social groups.

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Harris denies 'ludicrous' claims

BBC - Tue, 2014-05-27 09:25
TV entertainer Rolf Harris testifies for the first time at his indecent assault trial and denies a string of allegations involving four girls.

Former LulzSec Hacker Turned Informant Avoids Further Jail Time

NPR News - Tue, 2014-05-27 09:24

Hector Xavier Monsegur, or Sabu, was a well-respected hacker in the world of Anonymous. But as an informant, authorities say he helped cripple the hacktivist group. A judge let him off on time served.

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Median CEO Pay Tops $10 Million For The First Time

NPR News - Tue, 2014-05-27 09:20

An Associated Press study shows that most CEOs at S&P 500 companies are now making more than eight figures. Over the past four years, they've received raises topping 50 percent.

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Nicholson takes third European seat

BBC - Tue, 2014-05-27 09:17
The UUP's Jim Nicholson joins Sinn Fein's Martina Anderson and the DUP's Diane Dodds, as the third Northern Ireland MEP to be elected.

I have to move on, says Wozniacki

BBC - Tue, 2014-05-27 09:10
Caroline Wozniacki says she "just has to move on" after losing her first match since the end of her engagement to Rory McIlroy.

Does cycling help you live longer?

BBC - Tue, 2014-05-27 09:01
Does endurance cycling help you live longer?

University strike action ballot

BBC - Tue, 2014-05-27 08:52
Unions representing staff at Aberystwyth University will ballot their members on strike action over proposed pension changes.
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