National / International News

Armed gang jailed for pub robberies

BBC - Fri, 2014-11-21 09:29
A gang of robbers behind a string of armed raids on pubs and restaurants across Leeds are jailed.

Rutherford 'would back' Doha boycott

BBC - Fri, 2014-11-21 09:28
Greg Rutherford says he would support any athlete who chooses to boycott the 2019 World Championships.

VIDEO: Twitter co-founder defends application

BBC - Fri, 2014-11-21 09:18
The chairman and co-founder of Twitter is in London for the global launch of his new company 'Square'.

Coming out at work, in context

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-11-21 09:11

This past week, the Human Rights Campaign, the nation's largest LGBT rights organization, released its Corporate Equality Index which measures how Fortune 500 companies treat lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender employees in the workplace.

Things have changed a lot over the 10-plus years the group has released its annual report. Same sex marriage is now legal in more than thirty states, there are more rights for LGBT people in the workplace, and many big businesses have increased their protections for employees, introducing non-discrimination clauses, and partner benefits. This year, 366 Fortune 500 companies got a perfect score on the index, up from only 13 in 2002. 

Deena Fidas, director of Workplace Equality for the HRC, says the change is based in societal shifts and finances. "So many businesses have come to the realization that being an LGBT inclusive employer isn't just the right thing to do, it's actually smart business," she says.

But despite new workplace protections and benefits, "still, a little over half of all lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender workers in this country remain closeted on the job," Fidas says, "and so quite literally people are getting married on the weekends and not talking about it come Monday morning." 

In 29 states, there are still no legal protections against discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Legal issues definitely come into play in the decision to be out at work, Fidas says "but it's also the everyday environment." HRC survey responses indicated that LGBT people who aren't out at work feared that they'd make people uncomfortable. 

But staying closeted on the job may have some drawbacks, for LGBT and the companies they work for. Fidas says that people who aren't out at work may be less engaged with their jobs and their colleagues, and less likely to stay with one employer. Not being out at work could also mean fewer opportunities to make friends, or find valuable mentorship. 

Even millennials, typically known for their openness about sexuality, are aren't always out at work. "We find that actually, many of the youngest workers are out to their friends and family, they're out in their school environments, and yet they're going back in the closet when they get their first jobs," Fidas says.

For younger workers, the question to come out is a conundrum: they may feel they lack an established professional background, or be searching for a mentor, and want to keep their orientation private.

"Your mentor is somebody who you can confide in, you can talk about personal struggles," Fidas says, "and this is where we get into a bit of a Catch-22." The people who might most need guidance are often afraid to seek it out. One solution to this issue is something that many businesses are introducing: LGBT and allied affinity groups. "[They] provide a tremendously effective platform for young people to find a mentor," Fidas says. 

Some LGBT people are not just out at work, but out on their resumes. Fidas says that some people choose to come out in a resume because they want to highlight leadership experience that involves an LGBT affiliated group. Others choose to come out on a resume, subtly or explicitly, as a way to communicate their expectations to a potential employer that they are completely accepted at work. 

A recent study from Princeton University shows that things are changing for people who do choose to come out in their resume. While past research indicated that mentioning an LGBT group resulted in hiring and salary discrimination, the latest from Princeton shows that for white men, there's little to no impact, and for black men, coming out on a resume may actually result in more interviews and a higher starting salary. 

Still, there's no single, simple solution. "Bias happens," Fidas says, "whether it's conscious or unconscious."

A lot goes into the decision to come out and be out at work. Fidas says it isn't the right choice for everyone, particularly if their workplace doesn't have a nondiscrimination clause. "It's a conversation," she says.

 

France's Hollande to visit Guinea

BBC - Fri, 2014-11-21 08:52
France's President Francois Hollande says he will travel to the West African country of Guinea, one of the worst affected by the Ebola epidemic.

Weekendish: The best of the week's reads

BBC - Fri, 2014-11-21 08:45
A collection of some of the best reads from the BBC News website this week.

Thai Martial Law Will Remain In Place 'Indefinitely,' Minister Says

NPR News - Fri, 2014-11-21 08:43

The comments by the justice minister came in an interview to Reuters news agency nearly six months after the military overthrew the government of Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra.

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Venice considers wheeled luggage ban

BBC - Fri, 2014-11-21 08:42
The Italian city of Venice is considering a ban on noisy wheeled suitcases amid concerns they are keeping locals awake at night.

Brown's father urges calm in Ferguson

BBC - Fri, 2014-11-21 08:39
The father of a man shot dead by police in Ferguson, Missouri, has appealed for peace ahead of a grand jury decision against the officer.

10 things we didn't know last week

BBC - Fri, 2014-11-21 08:39
Seals fancy penguins, and more nuggets.

Britain objects to Falklands signs

BBC - Fri, 2014-11-21 08:31
The UK criticises an Argentine law requiring public transport vehicles to carry signs declaring the country's sovereignty claim over the Falkland Islands.

The Viagra Of The Himalayas Brings In Big Bucks And Big Problems

NPR News - Fri, 2014-11-21 08:31

A fungus consumes a worm and sprouts out of its head. The resulting ... thing ... is deemed an aphrodisiac and sells for more than gold. How do you keep people from killing each other to harvest it?

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VIDEO: Gebrselassie: From track to business

BBC - Fri, 2014-11-21 08:29
How Olympic athlete and world record holder Haile Gebrselassie has become a property mogul and leading investor in Ethiopia.

VIDEO: US snow prompts roof collapse fears

BBC - Fri, 2014-11-21 08:24
Residents in parts of New York State hit by severe snow storms are working to clear their roofs, amid fears that the weight of the snow could cause them to collapse.

Bellew fight is acid test - Cleverly

BBC - Fri, 2014-11-21 08:19
Nathan Cleverly says Saturday's much-hyped fight with Tony Bellew is the "acid test" for his world title credentials.

China rate cut spurs global markets

BBC - Fri, 2014-11-21 08:11
A cut in interest rates in China and comments from Europe's Central Bank chief spur US markets on to fresh highs

VIDEO: Dyson: 'Keep engineers in Britain'

BBC - Fri, 2014-11-21 08:06
James Dyson tells the BBC it is important to keep engineers in Britain to produce hi-tech exports, as he announces a £1bn investment in research and development.

In The Hospital, There's No Such Thing As A Lesbian Knee

NPR News - Fri, 2014-11-21 08:06

People in the LGBT community often have a hard time getting appropriate health care. But the problems aren't unique to them. Doesn't everyone want to have a doctor call them by their preferred name?

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VIDEO: The minute after Obama announced his immigration plan

BBC - Fri, 2014-11-21 07:58
The minute after Obama's immigration speech

The 3-Bird Turducken Has Nothing On This 17-Bird Royal Roast

NPR News - Fri, 2014-11-21 07:45

The Frenchman who was the world's first restaurant critic launched the world's first serial food journal in 1803. To wow readers, he offered a recipe for for rôti sans pareil, the roast without equal.

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