National / International News

'Teething problems' warning for T2

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-12 08:22
Passengers using Heathrow's new Terminal 2 are warned to expect early teething problems.

Building on the suburban dream

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-12 08:15
Building on the suburban dream

Labadie given 10-game ban for biting

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-12 08:09
Torquay's Joss Labadie is banned for 10 games by the FA after being found guilty of biting a Chesterfield player.

Mix Of Gut Microbes May Play Role In Crohn's Disease

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-12 08:05

Research involving more than 1,500 patients suggests people with Crohn's may have too many of the types of gut bacteria that tend to rile the immune system and too few that reduce inflammation.

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PODCAST: Overtime, overworked?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-03-12 08:02

The White House wants to make more Americans eligible for overtime pay. Currently, because of what is referred to as the Fair Labor Standards Act’s "white collar exemption," many salaried professionals are not entitled to extra pay if they work more than 40 hours per week. Later this week, the president intends to use his executive authority to change those rules. For 2014, which he is calling a "year of action," he has promised to pursue policy changes that do not involve congress. So whom would this change affect? "People who are defined as 'supervisors,'" says Gary Burtless, an economist at The Brookings Institution. "They have responsibility over other people besides themselves, a certain amount of independence."

Plus, it's hard enough measuring the mainstream economy. A new report from the Urban Institute has attempted to quantify the underground commercial sex economy. Researchers say in 2007 it was worth about $975 million, in just in seven U.S. cities. Curious about the business expenses of pimps? Check out their online feature for further insight. The Institute reports that pimps most often recruit sex workers from their own social circles. But the Internet is changing business. Bill Woolf is a detective with the Fairfax County Police Department in Virginia. He says most scouting and recruitment of victims by traffickers is now done online.

 

Google buys up games controller firm

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-12 07:51
Google has bought up much of Green Throttle Games, a firm that created gaming peripherals, for an undisclosed sum.

EU referendum unlikely, says Labour

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-12 07:42
Ed Miliband says an EU referendum is "unlikely" if he wins the next general election, but David Cameron argues that Labour's position makes "no sense whatsoever".

Ex-Missile Crew Members Say Cheating Is Part Of The Culture

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-12 07:41

The Air Force has acknowledged a problem with cheating on tests by nuclear missile officers. NPR spoke with eight former officers, and seven said they had participated in some kind of cheating.

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In pictures: Turkey mourns boy killed in protests

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-12 07:39
Thousands join funeral of a Berkin Elvan

'Irish Car Bomb' drink ad censored

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-12 07:33
A banner advertising "Irish Car Bomb" cocktails at a pub near the sites of two 1970s bombings is censored.

School curriculum to be reviewed

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-12 07:17
A review of the school curriculum and assessment in Wales is announced by the education minister amid concern about teaching quality and results.

How The Vice President of New Afrika Became Mayor Of Jackson

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-12 07:14

Just how did the late Chokwe Lumumba — a revolutionary who still threw up the Black Power salute on occasion — get elected the mayor of a mid-sized American city in the Deep South?

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S Africa accuses Rwanda of murder

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-12 07:10
South Africa accuses three expelled Rwandan diplomats of links to the murder and attempted murder of dissidents living in South Africa.

Is the word 'bossy' damaging to women?

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-12 07:08
There's a campaign to discourage the use of the word "bossy". Does the term destroy the confidence of young girls, asks Tom Heyden.

G4S pays £108.9m for tagging scandal

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-12 07:03
Troubled security firm G4S pays the UK government £108.9m for the tagging scandal, and admits that 2013 was "an extremely challenging year".

Glastonbury given 10-year licence

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-12 06:57
Glastonbury Festival is granted a new 10-year licence by Mendip District Council.

Apartment Building Explodes In Harlem, Killing At Least 2

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-12 06:48

The building, located at or near the corner of Park Ave. and 114th Street, reportedly exploded and collapsed around 9:30 a.m. At least two people are dead and many injured.

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Obama seeks expanded overtime pay

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-03-12 06:44

The White House wants to make more Americans eligible for overtime pay. Currently, because of what is referred to as the Fair Labor Standards Act’s “white collar exemption,” many salaried professionals are not entitled to extra pay if they work more than 40 hours per week.

Later this week, the president intends to use his executive authority to change those rules. For 2014, which he is calling a “year of action,” he has promised to pursue policy changes that do not involve congress.

So whom would this change affect? “People who are defined as ‘supervisors,’” says Gary Burtless, an economist at The Brookings Institution. “They have responsibility over other people besides themselves, a certain amount of independence.”

The economic recovery, Burtless argues, “has been better for profits than wages.” “The government is trying to put its thumb on the scale, helping workers,” he says.

Economist Jared Bernstein, a senior fellow with the liberal Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, has pushed for this change for more than a decade, since President George W. Bush expanded the exemption in 2004: 

“We’re talking about millions of workers who would be newly eligible for overtime pay,” he says.

Critics argue changing the exemption would make it harder for businesses to hire new employees, and it could motivate them to trim their payrolls. In the long run, employers could simply reduce a white-collar supervisor’s base pay, so there would be no difference to his overall salary.

Bill Kilberg, a partner with the law firm Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, says he “doesn’t know if it is a good idea.” Kilberg suspects the courts will be asked to decide whether or not a rule change would be constitutional. “They can give it deference or not give it deference.”

Obama seeks expanded overtime pay for 'millions'

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-03-12 06:44

The White House wants to make more Americans eligible for overtime pay. Currently, because of what is referred to as the Fair Labor Standards Act’s “white collar exemption,” many salaried professionals are not entitled to extra pay if they work more than 40 hours per week.

Later this week, the president intends to use his executive authority to change those rules. For 2014, which he is calling a “year of action,” he has promised to pursue policy changes that do not involve congress.

So whom would this change affect? “People who are defined as ‘supervisors,’” says Gary Burtless, an economist at The Brookings Institution. “They have responsibility over other people besides themselves, a certain amount of independence.”

The economic recovery, Burtless argues, “has been better for profits than wages.” “The government is trying to put its thumb on the scale, helping workers,” he says.

Economist Jared Bernstein, a senior fellow with the liberal Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, has pushed for this change for more than a decade, since President George W. Bush expanded the exemption in 2004: 

“We’re talking about millions of workers who would be newly eligible for overtime pay,” he says.

Critics argue changing the exemption would make it harder for businesses to hire new employees, and it could motivate them to trim their payrolls. In the long run, employers could simply reduce a white-collar supervisor’s base pay, so there would be no difference to his overall salary.

Bill Kilberg, a partner with the law firm Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, says he “doesn’t know if it is a good idea.” Kilberg suspects the courts will be asked to decide whether or not a rule change would be constitutional. “They can give it deference or not give it deference.”

Church to study for physics degree

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-12 06:40
Singer Charlotte Church says she is "geeking out" by looking into studying for a degree in physics.

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