National / International News

Hackers steal data using pitta bread

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-22 07:21
Secret encryption keys can be stolen using a cheap gadget so small it could be concealed inside some pitta bread.

England v Norway: 11 things to know

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-22 07:12
A mother of three, a Shoot magazine cover star and a former Morris dancer - a few things to learn about England women.

Obama uses 'n-word' in interview

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-22 06:50
US President Barack Obama says in an interview that the United States has yet to overcome its issues with racism.

U.N. Report Finds Israel, Hamas May Have Committed War Crimes

NPR News - Mon, 2015-06-22 06:45

The Independent Commission of Inquiry found there was a huge increase in firepower during the 2014 Israeli invasion of Gaza.

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Taylor Swift convinces Apple to pay indie artists

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-06-22 06:35

Taylor Swift’s social media shaming of Apple appears to have prompted the company to make changes to its new music streaming service—Apple Music.

Swift had threatening to withhold her album, "1989,” because of the company’s policy to not pay artists during a three-month trial period.

Apple’s reversal was announced on Twitter. Eddy Cue, the company’s senior vice president of internet software and services made the announcement that “We hear you Taylor Swift and indie artists,” via tweet, and Apple will pay royalties during the 3-month trial.

The specific behind Apple Music’s royalties plan remain to be revealed and Apple has declined to comment.

So, is this a win for musicians and artists?

“I would say it’s more of a blip than a major win,” said Miles Raymer, a freelance music journalist from Brooklyn.

Raymer points out that the economics of these new streaming services are still being sorted out, and the royalty issue was never a huge issue — for artists, or Apple.

“I think the quick reaction from Apple really underscores how little money is involved in the bigger picture,” Raymer said.  “Streaming royalties are a fraction of a penny per song. 

The cumulative amount of royalties that they'll pay over this three month period is a fraction of the billions that they invested to purchase Beats.”

So unless you are among the Taylor Swifts, Led Zeppelins, or the Beatles-es of the world, streaming royalties aren’t likely to make a dent in your bottom line

Even with the success of streaming music — Apple, Spotify, Soundcloud, TIDAL —  it’s a very crowded market.  But, Apple’s Jimmy Iovine (and Beats co-founder) claims that Apple Music will be the first “artist friendly,” streaming platform.

A statement Raymer believes amounts to little more than well-intentioned PR.

“Streaming platforms talking about being artist friendly sort of sounds like McDonalds talking about artisanal hamburgers—it sounds nice, but it won’t change anything.”

But controlling access to the distribution network, whether its terrestrial radio with Clear Channel, or the iTunes store, or Spotify means the artist will be subject to economics of other companies

Jim DeRogatis is the co-host of Sound Opinions on Chicago public radio.

“I mean, you've got to remember, in the history of humankind making music, the idea of selling recordings, or selling access to it is a mere century and change old,” DeRogatis said.

Which is why, DeRogatis noted, artists will always be better off if they can sell their music directly to consumers, either at concerts, or their own online marketplace.

Taylor Swift convinces Apple to pay indie artists

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2015-06-22 06:35

Taylor Swift’s social media shaming of Apple appears to have prompted the company to make changes to its new music streaming service—Apple Music.

Swift had threatening to withhold her album, "1989,” because of the company’s policy to not pay artists during a three-month trial period.

Apple’s reversal was announced on Twitter. Eddy Cue, the company’s senior vice president of internet software and services made the announcement that “We hear you Taylor Swift and indie artists,” via tweet, and Apple will pay royalties during the 3-month trial.

The specific behind Apple Music’s royalties plan remain to be revealed and Apple has declined to comment.

So, is this a win for musicians and artists?

“I would say it’s more of a blip than a major win,” said Miles Raymer, a freelance music journalist from Brooklyn.

Raymer points out that the economics of these new streaming services are still being sorted out, and the royalty issue was never a huge issue — for artists, or Apple.

“I think the quick reaction from Apple really underscores how little money is involved in the bigger picture,” Raymer said.  “Streaming royalties are a fraction of a penny per song. 

The cumulative amount of royalties that they'll pay over this three month period is a fraction of the billions that they invested to purchase Beats.”

So unless you are among the Taylor Swifts, Led Zeppelins, or the Beatles-es of the world, streaming royalties aren’t likely to make a dent in your bottom line

Even with the success of streaming music — Apple, Spotify, Soundcloud, TIDAL —  it’s a very crowded market.  But, Apple’s Jimmy Iovine (and Beats co-founder) claims that Apple Music will be the first “artist friendly,” streaming platform.

A statement Raymer believes amounts to little more than well-intentioned PR.

“Streaming platforms talking about being artist friendly sort of sounds like McDonalds talking about artisanal hamburgers—it sounds nice, but it won’t change anything.”

But controlling access to the distribution network, whether its terrestrial radio with Clear Channel, or the iTunes store, or Spotify means the artist will be subject to economics of other companies

Jim DeRogatis is the co-host of Sound Opinions on Chicago public radio.

“I mean, you've got to remember, in the history of humankind making music, the idea of selling recordings, or selling access to it is a mere century and change old,” DeRogatis said.

Which is why, DeRogatis noted, artists will always be better off if they can sell their music directly to consumers, either at concerts, or their own online marketplace.

Horner advocates use of F1 adviser

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-22 06:26
Red Bull team boss Christian Horner believes an independent adviser could help improve Formula 1.

Germany 'frees' al-Jazeera reporter

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-22 06:04
Al-Jazeera says one of its reporters held in Germany after an extradition request from Egypt over torture charges has been freed.

Stathakis: Greece rescued

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-22 06:02
Eurozone government heads to issue communique saying outline of agreement with Greece has been reached, Greek economy minister Giorgos Stathakis tells me.

Kenya slum residents get 'water ATMs'

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-22 06:02
Residents in the Mathare slum area of Kenya's capital, Nairobi, are now able to access water through an ATM-style dispenser.

Elderly woman 'beheaded in rampage'

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-22 05:59
An 82-year-old woman was beheaded in her garden by a man who went on a 45-minute rampage through a north London neighbourhood, a court hears.

Hope for Greek debt deal 'this week'

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-22 05:51
The Eurozone's top official says Greece's new proposals to end deadlock on its debt crisis are a positive step, and hopes a deal will come this week.

Artist designs football club mascot

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-22 05:49
Partick Thistle unveil a new mascot designed by artist David Shrigley after signing a six-figure sponsorship deal with a US investment firm.

Apple's dad-dancing problem-solver

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-22 05:31
A look at Eddy Cue, the Apple executive in the spotlight over music rights.

Benefit cuts - coming soon

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-22 05:27
George Osborne and Iain Duncan Smith met with the prime minister last Thursday to reach agreement on how to find the £12bn they've promised to cut from the nation's benefit bill in the next two years. It is not clear that they have yet found it.

Plane diverted 'following nuts row'

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-22 05:19
A plane en route from Rome to Chicago was forced to divert to Belfast after a man got angry over nuts and crackers, a court has heard.

IS online: Can it be stopped?

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-22 05:16
The BBC's Dominic Casciani ask: Can the self-styled Islamic State be taken offline?

VIDEO: Taliban attack Afghan parliament

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-22 05:10
The Taliban has launched an attack on the Afghan parliament, setting off a "huge car bomb" outside the building.

Ill Kvitova pulls out of Eastbourne

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-22 05:09
Defending Wimbledon champion Petra Kvitova has pulled out of the Aegon International with illness.

Five ways Taylor Swift is changing the world

BBC - Mon, 2015-06-22 05:04
Five ways Taylor Swift is changing the world

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