National / International News

Chelsea suspend two more fans

BBC - Fri, 2015-02-20 10:18
Chelsea suspend two more people from attending Stamford Bridge as a result of investigations into an incident of alleged racism on the Paris Metro.

Your Wallet: Where do you fall on the economic ladder?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-02-20 10:15

On next week's show, we're talking about economic classes, and how we get where we are.

So where do you fall? Have you spent your whole life in the middle class? Maybe you climbed into a new financial class, or did some backsliding.

We want to hear your stories.

Write to us, by visiting us on the web and clicking on go or tweet us, we're @MarketplaceWKND

India struggles with deadly flu

BBC - Fri, 2015-02-20 10:06
Indian health experts are struggling to contain the spread of swine flu, which has killed more than 700 in the deadliest outbreak in five years.

Strauss-Kahn pimping trial closes

BBC - Fri, 2015-02-20 09:56
The trial of former IMF chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn ends in France, with a judge declaring he will deliver his verdict on 12 June.

White House Will Ask To Put Decision On Obama's Immigration Action On Hold

NPR News - Fri, 2015-02-20 09:56

The White House will ask a higher court to allow Obama's executive actions to take effect, while the case is in court. A federal judge in Texas ruled Obama overstepped his authority.

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Kellie Maloney eyes boxing return

BBC - Fri, 2015-02-20 09:55
Kellie Maloney considers applying for a promoter's licence after relinquishing her original licence to start gender reassignment.

How much is a secret worth?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-02-20 09:55

This week on the show, we've heard stories of side businesses and workarounds, secrets of sorts that impact the economy or our personal finances.

But what about the business of secrets? How much is a secret worth, in dollars?

We decided to find out, from someone whose business is in unveiling government secrets.

MuckRock is an organization that charges people -- journalists, researchers, citizens -- to file information requests. They use the Freedom of Information Act -- FOIA -- to obtain documents and data from the government.

MuckRock files thousands of requests...right now, they're looking into the CIA.

Marketplace Weekend spoke to Michael Morisy, co-founder of MuckRock and Knight fellow at Stanford, about the process of uncovering information.

To hear the whole story, tune in to the audio player above. 

My Money Story: Driving for Lyft

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-02-20 09:51

Moonlighting, second jobs, side projects. Working a side business in this economy is a fairly common thing.

Sometimes it's to indulge a passion. Sometimes it's to make ends meet.

Kim Buckley works to support herself and her daughter in Los Angeles. And her side business turned into....another side business.

Kim works in transportation with the LA unified school district. She also drives for the ride sharing service Lyft. And  that service's main competition, Uber. 

To hear Kim's whole story, listen in the audio player above. 

UN to name Syria 'war criminals'

BBC - Fri, 2015-02-20 09:42
UN investigators say they are poised to reveal the names of an estimated 200 individuals suspected of committing war crimes in Syria.

Arctic Temperatures Create Enormous Ice Formations At Niagara Falls

NPR News - Fri, 2015-02-20 09:42

The air temperature at Niagara Falls is so cold that the water and mist coming off the falls is frozen in place.

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Dissolving Contact Lenses Could Make Eye Drops Disappear

NPR News - Fri, 2015-02-20 09:39

Eye drops are unpleasant, and they don't do a great job of delivering medication to the eye. A superthin wafer that slowly dispenses medication and then dissolves is a promising replacement.

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YouTube Is Expected To Unveil New App Just For Kids

NPR News - Fri, 2015-02-20 09:37

The new app, called YouTube Kids, is due to be released Monday. It will offer original episodes of popular shows such as Sesame Street.

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Bitter Cold Spell Is One For The Record Books

NPR News - Fri, 2015-02-20 09:35

From the Dakotas to Florida and down the East Coast, the 'Siberian Express' has much of the U.S. locked in a frigid bear hug.

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Labor Secretary Perez Says To Dock Workers And Port Operators: Squash It Today

NPR News - Fri, 2015-02-20 09:26

The Labor secretary has intervened in the negotiations and the ongoing labor dispute is hitting U.S. businesses.

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How do you make a better life, and what does it mean?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-02-20 09:23

In a partnership with the BBC, in a series called Six Routes to Riches, Lizzie O'Leary has been exploring what happens when the global economy collides with real life.

How do you make a better life? And what does that mean? This week, O'Leary is joined by the BBC's Nkem Ifejika, who digs in to Nigeria's economy. Ifejika grew up in Nigeria, and has watched the economy change and shift.

In coming weeks, we'll also report from India, China, and the United States.

Next week, you'll hear O'Leary's own reporting from Brazil. O'Leary spent the past two weeks there, talking to the people at the top of the economic ladder.

How do you make better life? And what does that mean?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-02-20 09:23

In a partnership with the BBC, in a series called Six Routes to Riches, Lizzie O'Leary has been exploring what happens when the global economy collides with real life.

How do you make a better life? And what does that mean? This week, O'Leary is joined by the BBC's Nkem Ifejika, who digs in to Nigeria's economy. Ifejika grew up in Nigeria, and has watched the economy change and shift.

In coming weeks, we'll also report from India, China, and the United States.

Next week, you'll hear O'Leary's own reporting from Brazil. O'Leary spent the past two weeks there, talking to the people at the top of the economic ladder.

Fun Fact Friday: Social media, still a thing making tons of money

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-02-20 09:22

Catherine Rampell from The Washington Post and Sudeep Reddy of the Wall Street Journal wrap up the week in news. But, what else did we learn this week?

Fun fact: Instagram now has more than 300 million users worldwide.

Photo sharing, however, was not the initial intention for the app. Discover more fun facts about Instagram and its co-founder, Kevin Systrom here: 

How a humble stray dog helped launch Instagram

Fun fact: An acre-foot of farmland uses the equivalent to 326,000 gallons of water.

Since farming requires a lot of water, Farmers are adapting to the current drought conditions in California by switching to drip-irrrigating methods as opposed to flooding, and choosing to produce lucrative crops over low-value crops. 

Central Valley farms come at a cost for dry California

Fun fact: Snapchat is reportedly worth as much as $19 billion now.

With Snapchat's ads running for a rumored minimum price of $750,000 a day and its recent collaboration with news and entertainment channels, investors appear more than eager to raise the social media company's valuation.

Here's why Snapchat has doubled in value

Fun fact: Chinese companies invested more than $12 billion in projects in 2014.

Where the U.S. was once outsourcing, it now seems China is venturing into the U.S. A change in growth model has left Chinese companies seeking the kinds of skilled labor available in the United States, which is why many have began opening up shops from Texas to Indiana.

Chinese factories move to a new frontier: America

Remember CD's? Yeah, Starbucks is done selling those.

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-02-20 09:22

Billboard reported this week that Starbucks is going to stop selling compact discs in its stores come March.

There was a time, Billboard says, when Starbucks was doing $65 million a year in CD sales.

But no more, because — and here comes the line of the day — they're gonna stop selling what no one listens to music on anymore anyway.

 

Sysco swallows up the second biggest food company

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-02-20 09:22

The Sysco truck is everywhere, unloading in front of restaurants, schools, hospitals and colleges. Packed inside are boxes of seafood, beef, chicken, baked goods and napkins. They are biggest distributor of foods in the U.S., and now, they're ready to merge with US Foods.

But, the Federal Trade Commission filed a lawsuit to stop the merger.

Before you consider whether Sysco’s proposed merger would violate antitrust laws, you have to understand what Sysco does. As a food distribution company, it is really good at logistics and their deliveries come with few hassles. Say you’re a mom-and-pop sandwich shop, you don’t want to think too much about how much the tomatoes in your BLT cost, or whether the tomatoes will arrive on time.

Then again, imagine you are a gourmet restaurant and want vine-ripened heirloom tomatoes to toss with your fair-trade arugula salad, you might find yourself looking elsewhere.

“Sysco is considered the Chevrolet of the industry," says Andrew Wolf, an analyst with BB&T. "And a lot of these chefs, especially the very high-end, they're looking for products closer to a Ferrari.”

So whether Sysco, in its merged form, would dominate the “broad line” food distribution market isn’t really up for debate. The question is: What’s a market, and who gets to decide?

As for this one, the courts will get the final say.

 

 

This oil rig count may no longer be relevant

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-02-20 09:22

Today brought another weekly installation of the most closely watched number in the oil patch: the rig count. That’s the measure of how many rigs are currently in operation. The count has fallen 37 percent over last year to 1019 rigs. With oil prices so volatile, Longbow Asset Management analyst Jake Dollarhide says even regular people now watch the rig count.

 But how good of a metric is this? How well does it predict future oil production? Eric Kuhle of Wood MacKenzie has detected a “strong disconnect” between the number of rigs and production. Analysts who see this decoupling says it’s a function of the modern era of extracting oil from shale rock. Kuhle says idled rigs tend to be the less productive ones, leaving the drilling superstars still in operation. Those who see a disconnect suggest the rig count plunge may overstate how bad things are.

Still, Steven Kopits of Princeton Energy Advisors says the rig count has fallen so steeply, production has to fall. It may be a question of how much.

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