National / International News

Ebola nurse 'may have touched face'

BBC - Wed, 2014-10-08 10:34
The Spanish nurse infected with Ebola touched her face with her gloves after treating a priest who died from the disease, a doctor says.

Texas Officials Say They Will Cremate Ebola Patient's Remains

NPR News - Wed, 2014-10-08 10:20

As relatives grieve, public health officials are setting in place a plan to safely care for the remains of Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan. Cremation or burial are both acceptable, the CDC says.

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VIDEO: Footage of London terror raid

BBC - Wed, 2014-10-08 10:18
It is understood that one of four men arrested in anti-terror raids in London on Tuesday is a man called Tarik Hassane, from Ladbroke Grove in west London.

Steel's slow, grinding growth

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-10-08 10:08

The economy is growing at 4 percent per year. Unemployment is down. But that's not always how the economy feels, day to day.

Lisa Goldenberg is the president of Delaware Steel Company of Pennsylvania, where she has a front-row seat to how the economic outlook is making life easier — or harder — for businesses. In a July interview, Goldenberg lamented that things weren't going as well as she had hoped. She has that same grinding sense of progress today.

"We should have had a stronger September. We're doing okay, but okay isn't good enough. It's a struggle," Goldenberg says.

The bright spots: construction, energy and cars.

"For the steel business, construction is a good thing," Goldenberg says. "People go out, they need washers and dryers made out of steel."

But are things better than July? No, she says. People have a little more money to spend, but not enough to pay off debts from the past few years. And definitely not enough savings to buy a house.

"It's painful to live through slow, even, deliberate growth," Goldenberg says. But even so, "it's the best way, in my opinion, to build a solid economy."

VIDEO: Ebola outbreak: Your questions

BBC - Wed, 2014-10-08 09:58
With concerns about Ebola rising, the BBC's health correspondent, Branwen Jeffreys, answers your questions.

'Volatile' tornado rips roof off home

BBC - Wed, 2014-10-08 09:57
A tornado causes damage to homes and vehicles in a Derbyshire town.

We Don't Know A Lot About Dogs And Ebola — But We Should

NPR News - Wed, 2014-10-08 09:55

The story of Excalibur, whose Spanish owner has Ebola, raises many questions. Can dogs catch the virus? How would we know if they did? Could they infect humans? We asked a specialist for answers.

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£146m axed from council budgets

BBC - Wed, 2014-10-08 09:48
Councils in Wales are told they will get £146m less in 2015-16 from the Welsh government - an overall cut of 3.4%.

Five U.S. Airports Will Institute New Ebola Screening Procedures

NPR News - Wed, 2014-10-08 09:47

Passengers arriving from some countries in West Africa will have their temperatures taken upon arrival. They will also be asked to keep

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Painted caves challenge art origins

BBC - Wed, 2014-10-08 09:05
The discovery of 40,000-year-old artworks in Indonesian caves challenges established views on the origins of humans' artistic capabilities.

Why we tip more than we used to

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-10-08 09:00

Tipping can be a contentious issue in the U.S., especially in light of the debate over raising the minimum wage. Whether tipped employees should even be paid minimum wage is still a question up for debate in most states.

With the hardships of low-wage workers on their mind, consumers might be compelled to increase the percentage of their gratuity in instances like dining in a restaurant. Concerns over low wages might be the reason why, percentage-wise, we tip more compared to past decades.

Or is it some other economic reason tied to the rise or fall of food prices? Does the average diner even pay attention to those factors?

Looking at historical data on the U.S., there does seem to be a general rise in how big of a percentage people tip, says Mike Lynn, a marketing professor and expert in tipping behavior at Cornell University School of Hotel Administration.

“If you look at etiquette books, going back pretty far, etiquette books were recommending 15 percent tips,” Lynn says, “But there was a survey by Leo Crespi in Public Opinion Quarterly in 1947, and what was clear was that people were tipping 10 percent on average in restaurants.”

Other etiquette books reinforced the 10 percent norm for tipping as well.

An excerpt from \"The itching palm; a study of the habit of tipping in America,\" an anti-tipping etiquette book published in 1916.

William R. Scott/The Penn publishing company of Philadelphia via California Digital Library

The rise of tipping to a more 15 percent standard may have more to do with how the tipper wants to be perceived, Lynn says.

“My theory is that some people tip as a positional good. To get ahead of others,” Lynn says, “They want better service than other people get. They want the server to look up to them and respect them more. They tip to get out ahead of others, and once some people do that, it puts pressure on everybody else.”

Lynn cautions that his theory is based more on his own observations rather than hard evidence on tipping, which is difficult to come by, but he does say there is evidence that tipping is more common in countries that are more status-oriented.

Lynn also says we shouldn’t totally discount people who say they do tip to rectify what they see as unfair wage practices for servers, in which they are paid below the state minimum wage. He also points out that in states like California, where tipped employees do make at least the state minimum wage, tipping rates aren’t significantly lower than in states with different policies.

Injured Ozil out for up to 12 weeks

BBC - Wed, 2014-10-08 08:48
Arsenal midfielder Mesut Ozil is "likely to be out for 10 to 12 weeks" with a knee injury, his national team Germany announce.

VIDEO: EU: Enlargement Package

BBC - Wed, 2014-10-08 08:46
Enlargement commissioner Štefan Füle says a number of EU candidate countries require further progress.

Europe backs Hinkley nuclear plant

BBC - Wed, 2014-10-08 08:34
A new £24.5bn nuclear power station at Hinkley Point in Somerset is to go ahead after it received final approval from European Union regulators.

Bercow aide out after Lib Dem speech

BBC - Wed, 2014-10-08 08:29
A spokeswoman for Commons Speaker John Bercow resigns after an outspoken speech at the Liberal Democrat conference.

The numbers for October 8, 2014

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-10-08 08:14

Five U.S. airports will begin screening passengers arriving from West Africa for Ebola starting this weekend. Kennedy International will be the first, the New York Times reported, followed by O'Hare, Washington Dulles, Hartsfield-Jackson and Newark Liberty international airports.

The announcement comes right after the death of Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person to be diagnosed with Ebola in the U.S. since the outbreak began, on Wednesday morning.

In other news, the Fed minutes are expected later today, along with the usual combing for clues about interest rate hikes. In the meantime, here are the other numbers we're watching Wednesday:

25 minutes

That's how long one employee says he waited, unpaid, to be screened for stolen merchandise following a 12-hour shift at an Amazon fulfillment center. Jesse Busk sued the staffing agency that placed him in the job, Bloomberg reported, and several other suits against Amazon followed. The allegations will be heard by the Supreme Court Wednesday.

5

Google, Yahoo, Microsoft, LinkedIn and Facebook all compromised with the Justice Department in January over disclosing details of government requests to the public. Those firms are now able to give some more general information about data requests that were previously confidential. Twitter argues the remaining restrictions infringe on its First Amendment rights, the Washington Post reported, and the tech company is suing the government.

$27 billion

Netflix's estimated market cap, making its recent deals for a "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" sequel and four Adam Sandler movies seem downright affordable to a streaming service that already spends $3 billion on content annually. Those numbers come from a Variety analysis of Netflix's recent push to the big screen, which posits big theater chains might be forced to get on board with the streaming model... or go the way of Blockbuster.

Osborne 'hears Robinson budget plan'

BBC - Wed, 2014-10-08 08:08
First Minister Peter Robinson has been in contact with Chancellor George Osborne to discuss proposals to ease Stormont's immediate financial challenges, the BBC understands.

Ebola 'hysteria' halts school visit

BBC - Wed, 2014-10-08 08:00
A headteacher blames "misguided hysteria" over Ebola for the cancellation of a school visit by a child from Sierra Leone.

F1 has never stopped striving for safety since Senna death

BBC - Wed, 2014-10-08 07:43
Despite Jules Bianchi’s accident, the 1994 death of Ayrton Senna was already a wake-up call which those in charge of the sport have never forgotten.

Call for change in NI abortion law

BBC - Wed, 2014-10-08 07:43
Abortions should be allowed in Northern Ireland where the foetus has a lethal abnormality, the Stormont Department of Justice has recommended.

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