National / International News

VIDEO: Making medicine in a man's world

BBC - Fri, 2015-07-24 03:03
The BBC meets one woman running her own manufacturing plant near the city of Pune. Satya Vadlamani is the managing director of Murli Krishna Pharma.

PODCAST: Housing sales for June

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-07-24 03:00

The June report for new home sales is out today - we'll talk about what to expect. Plus, we'll talk about what to make of recent movement in the Chinese stock market. And President Obama arrives in Kenya on Friday for a three-day visit. It's his first trip to the country where his father was born since he was elected. The visit is bringing a mini-economic boost for some Kenyans.

Report: Officials Seek Criminal Inquiry Over Clinton's Use Of Private Email

NPR News - Fri, 2015-07-24 02:57

The New York Times reports that two inspectors general want the Justice Department to investigate whether classified information was mishandled.

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UK box office up by 10% in 2015

BBC - Fri, 2015-07-24 02:51
The UK box office sees a 10% rise in ticket sales in the first half of the year, compared to the same period in 2014.

Nile 'party boat' death toll rises

BBC - Fri, 2015-07-24 02:51
The death toll from a boat crash on the River Nile in Egypt rises to 29, as the search for more bodies continues.

Teams face World Cup qualifying draw

BBC - Fri, 2015-07-24 02:49
The draw for the 2018 World Cup qualification campaign will take place in the Russian city of St Petersburg on Saturday.

Visa attacks Fifa's 'standards'

BBC - Fri, 2015-07-24 02:45
Visa's chief executive has lambasted Fifa for "not living up to standards" and "lack of awareness" of the seriousness of charges of corruption against it.

The FT and the value of digital news

BBC - Fri, 2015-07-24 02:45
In an era of digital disruption to the news industry, with readers and advertisers melting away, one British newspaper has managed to prosper more than most.

VIDEO: How do you do a handstand on a horse?

BBC - Fri, 2015-07-24 02:42
The English vaulting champion who is training for the European Games next month said combining her two loves of horses and gymnastics is "second nature".

Iraq Inquiry will need 'extra help'

BBC - Fri, 2015-07-24 02:35
The Iraq Inquiry will require "additional assistance" from the government to complete its work, its chairman Sir John Chilcot says.

Defiant Obama to speak on gay rights

BBC - Fri, 2015-07-24 02:33
US President Obama tells the BBC he will continue to deliver his "blunt message" about gay rights and discrimination on his trip to Kenya and Ethiopia.

Uber sued for £198m in Canada

BBC - Fri, 2015-07-24 02:33
Taxi-booking app Uber is hit with £198m joint legal action by taxi drivers in Canada's biggest city Toronto.

Delph off on stretcher on City debut

BBC - Fri, 2015-07-24 02:29
Fabian Delph's Manchester City debut ends after 18 minutes as he suffers a hamstring injury against Real Madrid.

Obama's Roots A Source Of Pride — And Discord — In Kenya

NPR News - Fri, 2015-07-24 02:14

When President Obama was elected in 2008, Kenyans rejoiced. U.S.-Kenya relations have had ups and downs since then. Kenyans now eagerly await Obama's first presidential visit to his father's homeland.

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VIDEO: Perez unhurt after flipping car

BBC - Fri, 2015-07-24 02:12
Sergio Perez escapes unhurt after a scary crash in first practice for the Hungarian Grand Prix.

Lecturer critically ill on Asia trip

BBC - Fri, 2015-07-24 02:09
A university lecturer based in north Wales is in a critical condition after falling ill during a visit to China.

Affordable housing for teachers in short supply

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-07-24 02:00

Jennifer Marlar teaches seventh grade language arts at Jackson Hole Middle School in Jackson, Wyoming, but she doesn’t live anywhere near the tourist town’s shopping district or ski area.

“It just makes the most sense, financially,” Marlar says.

Instead, she commutes one hour — over a sometimes-treacherous mountain pass — from her home in Driggs, Idaho.

“It’s brutal,” says Marlar. “And that hour feels like eternity.”

Marlar makes $70,000 a year. That’s well above the national average teacher salary of $56,000, but it’s not enough to buy a home in Jackson, a swanky resort town south of Yellowstone National Park. The median home price there is nearly $1 million. So, when Marlar’s daughter Aniston starts preschool in Idaho, she’ll likely leave her job in Jackson.

“I’ll probably have to resign there and try to get work on this side so that I can be a part of my community that I live in,” Marlar says.

Renting or buying a place to live is becoming less affordable across much of the country. That’s hit low-income Americans hardest, but increasingly, it also means middle-income earners that hold key jobs — like teachers — can’t afford to live where they work. It’s a problem facing all high-cost communities: big cities, wealthy suburbs, and tiny resort towns like Jackson.

Teacher Jess Tuchscherer works in Jackson and lives here in a converted barn. The tour of his place only takes a few seconds.

“Well, this is the living room, kitchen, bathroom and bedroom — and that’s really it,” says Tuchscherer. “It’s not very big.”

Tuchscherer rents the barn for about $1,000 a month. He loves his job and the winter recreation opportunities here, but knows this isn’t a long-term gig.

“I can’t buy a home here, so therefore I can’t really stay here,” Tuchscherer says. “It’s great, but I can’t raise a family in this house.”

This is a huge problem here. That’s why Jackson just put up its first-ever affordable housing units for teachers.

“If we fail to house the people that work here, then we will not have a quality workforce, we will not have a quality system of education, and we will suffer in all respects,” says Anne Cresswell, of the Jackson Hole Community Housing Trust, which partnered with the school district to build the homes.

The three-bedroom homes were sold to local educators for $403,000 each, but were appraised at closer to $650,000. Cresswell’s group has developed similar housing for hospital workers and national park employees.

“Affordable housing is as basic to the essential infrastructure in Jackson Hole, Wyoming as any other road, water or sewer project is,” Cresswell says.

It’s a solution communities from Baltimore to Los Angeles are trying out. A National Housing Conference report shows teachers can’t afford median-priced homes in one-third of the 200 metro areas it surveyed.

“That can really put communities at a disadvantage for attracting high quality teachers, nurses or police officers who are unwilling to remain committed to extremely long commutes,” says Janet Viveiros, senior research associate at the National Housing Conference.

And, in many communities, the problem is only getting worse.

“There’s not enough affordable housing as there is and many communities are losing the affordable housing that already exists,” Viveiros says.

Bringing teaching talent to high-cost communities is hard, and will get even harder in the future. The National Education Association says half of the country’s teachers will likely retire in the next five to seven years.

Kenyans hope to cash in on Obama visit

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-07-24 02:00

During his first trip to the country as president, Barack Obama is expected to discuss ways to fight regional terrorism with Kenya’s leaders and speak at the “Global Entrepreneurship Summit” in the capital, Nairobi.

Kenyan businesses are prepping for his visit, and that of the thousands of diplomats and conference-goers expected to descend on Nairobi for the summit.
 
“I’ve been having so many many clients coming in,” says David Meeriah of Nairobi’s Capital Limo Services. He says his fleet of luxury cars is fully booked, and  he’ll make enough in the next few days to pay salaries for the next three months.  

Kenyan tour operators like Hamadi Durogi of Wildcat Adventure Safaris are banking on those who won’t go home right away.

"We’ve seen like a 40 percent increase in business and also in inquiries," he says. His company, like many others, offers an "Obama Safari" with a stop in the hometown of the President’s father.

Smaller vendors are flooding the capital with Obama-themed t-shirts, hats, and posters. They’re hoping the his visit will bring back tourists frightened away by recent terrorist attacks.

“Since the President of the United States is going to be here," says Durogi, "it’s going to be proof enough that Kenya is very very safe.”

He, and others in Kenya's tourism industry, are hoping the economic boost will last long after the President’s departure.

Kenyans hope to cash in on Obama visit

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-07-24 02:00

During his first trip to the country as president, Barack Obama is expected to discuss ways to fight regional terrorism with Kenya’s leaders and speak at the “Global Entrepreneurship Summit” in the capital, Nairobi.

Kenyan businesses are prepping for his visit, and that of the thousands of diplomats and conference-goers expected to descend on Nairobi for the summit.
 
“I’ve been having so many many clients coming in,” says David Meeriah of Nairobi’s Capital Limo Services. He says his fleet of luxury cars is fully booked, and  he’ll make enough in the next few days to pay salaries for the next three months.  

Kenyan tour operators like Hamadi Durogi of Wildcat Adventure Safaris are banking on those who won’t go home right away.

"We’ve seen like a 40 percent increase in business and also in inquiries," he says. His company, like many others, offers an "Obama Safari" with a stop in the hometown of the President’s father.

Smaller vendors are flooding the capital with Obama-themed t-shirts, hats, and posters. They’re hoping the his visit will bring back tourists frightened away by recent terrorist attacks.

“Since the President of the United States is going to be here," says Durogi, "it’s going to be proof enough that Kenya is very very safe.”

He, and others in Kenya's tourism industry, are hoping the economic boost will last long after the President’s departure.

UN says Syria donors aren't paying their pledges

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2015-07-24 02:00

Syria’s civil war is now four years old, and there is no end in sight. A variety of international efforts to halt the bloodshed have stymied some of the world’s most seasoned diplomats.

One group of people losing out most from this grinding war are Syria’s refugees. Of the millions displaced by the war, about 4 million people have left Syria entirely. Most of them have fled to Lebanon, Turkey and Jordan.

The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees says that it’s again facing its recurring problem: donors don’t pay what they promise

UNHCR has only received about $1 billion of the nearly $5 billion it needs to provide basic assistance to Syrian refugees.

“Our income keeps growing but the problem is our needs keep mushrooming,” says Melissa Fleming, chief spokesperson for UNHCR.

She says only 23 percent of this year’s funding goal has been delivered so far. And winter is coming.

A quarter of the people who have fled Syria live in tiny Lebanon, which per capita has the highest number of Syrian refugees — today, a quarter of its population.

“It is always the case that funding received does not match the needs on the ground,” says Dana Sleiman, spokesperson for UNHCR in Beirut.

Sleiman says UNHCR proceeds with its plans whether the funding is there or not, because they have no choice. “If and when funding does not come through, the repercussions are severe,” she explains.

So severe that more and more Syrian refugees are again risking their lives on sea voyages to Europe.

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