National / International News

For Advocates And Telephone Companies, NSA Changes Are Welcome News

NPR News - Tue, 2014-03-25 12:00

A House committee and the White House are proposing to move the NSA's phone records program to the hands of phone companies. Privacy advocates and phone companies both support these proposals.

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Out Of White House And Congress, Two Proposals To Change NSA Practices

NPR News - Tue, 2014-03-25 12:00

House Republicans are proposing a limit on the National Security Agency's phone records program. President Obama also repeated support for having phone companies keep the records, rather than the NSA.

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VIDEO: China families vent missing plane fury

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 11:48
Angry relatives of passengers on board the missing Malaysia Airlines plane have clashed with police outside Malaysia's embassy in the Chinese capital, Beijing.

Tuberculosis Roars Back With A Deadly Edge

NPR News - Tue, 2014-03-25 11:44

PBS's Frontline travels to the epicenter of a rising epidemic: drug-resistant tuberculosis that's costly and tough to treat. Join us for a live Twitter chat tonight during the film's premiere.

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VIDEO: Ceiling collapse theatre set to reopen

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 11:36
The Apollo theatre in London's West End is ready to reopen, three months after its roof collapsed during a performance, injuring 76 people.

With Ribbons, Russians Show Support For Takeover In Crimea

NPR News - Tue, 2014-03-25 11:33

Politicians have adopted the orange and black ribbons in a symbolic move that was first introduced by Catherine the Great in the 18th century.

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Met chief orders ban on shredding

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 11:29
The head of the Metropolitan Police asks "that there is no more shredding" of documents while he deals with claims that files relating to a corruption review were destroyed.

Obama: Pray for US mudslide victims

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 11:27
President Barack Obama urges Americans to pray for victims of the Washington state mudslide as officials predict the death toll of 14 will rise.

Oil and gas will drive future control of the South China Sea

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-03-25 11:13

The global geopolitical conversation this week is focused on Europe and Ukraine and what the G7 is going do about Russia.

However, eventually and probably sooner rather than later, the conversation is going to turn back to Asia. President Obama's got a trip scheduled to the region next month, and somewhere in his conversations with leaders there the South China Sea is going to come up; who gets to control it and who gets the oil and natural gas reserves that are under the ocean floor.

In his new book “Asia's Cauldron: The South China Sea and The End of a Stable Pacific”, Robert Kaplan breaks down how a possible dispute over the South China Sea could have a substantial impact.

Kaplan notes that the South China Sea is said to have oil reserves of seven billion barrels and over 900 cubic feet of natural gas. This makes it very attractive to countries in the region. Kaplan said the biggest competitor for control of the South China Sea is China. 

“The Chinese themselves claim what’s called the nine dash line or the whole heart of the sea itself” said Kaplan. “China sees the South China Sea, the way the United States saw the Caribbean in the 19th and early 20th century; as the blue water extension of its continental landmass that it must dominate”.

Kaplan said the possible dispute over who owns the South China Sea could have a staunching economic impact.

“If the pacific is no longer stable, that will affect investment, growth rates, etc.” said Kaplan. “If you ask me what’s the biggest question in the world today; it’s not ‘Will Iran get its Nukes?’ it’s the direction of the Chinese economy.”

China claims that the South China Sea will produce 130 million barrels of oil.  Kaplan said that if this calculation is correct, the South China Sea is only second to Saudi Arabia in terms of how much oil it has.

Oil and gas will drive future control of the South China Sea

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-03-25 11:13

The global geopolitical conversation this week is focused on Europe and Ukraine and what the G7 is going do about Russia.

However, eventually and probably sooner rather than later, the conversation is going to turn back to Asia. President Obama's got a trip scheduled to the region next month, and somewhere in his conversations with leaders there the South China Sea is going to come up; who gets to control it and who gets the oil and natural gas reserves that are under the ocean floor.

In his new book “Asia's Cauldron: The South China Sea and The End of a Stable Pacific”, Robert Kaplan breaks down how a possible dispute over the South China Sea could have a substantial impact.

Kaplan notes that the South China Sea is said to have oil reserves of seven billion barrels and over 900 cubic feet of natural gas. This makes it very attractive to countries in the region. Kaplan said the biggest competitor for control of the South China Sea is China. 

“The Chinese themselves claim what’s called the nine dash line or the whole heart of the sea itself” said Kaplan. “China sees the South China Sea, the way the United States saw the Caribbean in the 19th and early 20th century; as the blue water extension of its continental landmass that it must dominate”.

Kaplan said the possible dispute over who owns the South China Sea could have a staunching economic impact.

“If the pacific is no longer stable, that will affect investment, growth rates, etc.” said Kaplan. “If you ask me what’s the biggest question in the world today; it’s not ‘Will Iran get its Nukes?’ it’s the direction of the Chinese economy.”

China claims that the South China Sea will produce 130 million barrels of oil.  Kaplan said that if this calculation is correct, the South China Sea is only second to Saudi Arabia in terms of how much oil it has.

Oil and gas will drive disputes on future control of the South China Sea

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-03-25 11:13

The global geopolitical conversation this week is focused on Europe and Ukraine and what the G7 is going do about Russia.

However, eventually and probably sooner rather than later, the conversation is going to turn back to Asia. President Obama's got a trip scheduled to the region next month, and somewhere in his conversations with leaders there the South China Sea is going to come up; who gets to control it and who gets the oil and natural gas reserves that are under the ocean floor.

In his new book “Asia's Cauldron: The South China Sea and The End of a Stable Pacific”, Robert Kaplan breaks down how a possible dispute over the South China Sea could have a substantial impact.

Kaplan notes that the South China Sea is said to have oil reserves of seven billion barrels and over 900 cubic feet of natural gas. This makes it very attractive to countries in the region. Kaplan said the biggest competitor for control of the South China Sea is China. 

“The Chinese themselves claim what’s called the nine dash line or the whole heart of the sea itself” said Kaplan. “China sees the South China Sea, the way the United States saw the Caribbean in the 19th and early 20th century; as the blue water extension of its continental landmass that it must dominate”.

Kaplan said the possible dispute over who owns the South China Sea could have a staunching economic impact.

“If the pacific is no longer stable, that will affect investment, growth rates, etc.” said Kaplan. “If you ask me what’s the biggest question in the world today; it’s not ‘Will Iran get its Nukes?’ it’s the direction of the Chinese economy.”

China claims that the South China Sea will produce 130 million barrels of oil.  Kaplan said that if this calculation is correct, the South China Sea is only second to Saudi Arabia in terms of how much oil it has.

Treasury to sell more Lloyds shares

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 11:13
The government announces plans to return more of Lloyds Banking Group to the private sector, with the sale of a 7.5% stake to investors.

Holder Ding beaten in first round

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 11:08
Ding Junhui is beaten by Ben Woollaston in the first round of the Players' Championship Grand Final in Preston.

Pollution From Home Stoves Kills Millions Of People Worldwide

NPR News - Tue, 2014-03-25 11:07

Air pollution causes 1 in 8 deaths worldwide, with half of the deaths caused by fumes from home stoves. Fixing the problem isn't as simple as providing more efficient stoves. Habits must change, too.

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VIDEO: Osborne plays bingo in Cardiff

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 10:55
George Osborne has tried his hand at bingo after recently announcing a plan to halve bingo tax from 20% to 10%.

Your Smartphone Is A Crucial Police Tool, If They Can Crack It

NPR News - Tue, 2014-03-25 10:54

Suspects' smartphones contain a wealth of information: calls, photos, GPS data. With so much info, it's often all police need to make a case. But with fast-changing phone technology, it can take work.

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In which Kai Ryssdal has to settle for $22.40

Marketplace - American Public Media - Tue, 2014-03-25 10:52

I got an email from Amazon this morning, telling me I had a credit of $22.40 in my account. It's a payout from the $166 million e-book price-fixing settlement.

What's interesting is how they figured out who got how much: It's $3.17 for each New York Times best-seller you bought, and $0.73 for everything else.

Did you get a settlement payout? Tell us on our RebelMouse page:

IRS Says It Will Treat Bitcoins As Property, Not Currency

NPR News - Tue, 2014-03-25 10:47

This means any profits made on the currency will be taxed at the lower, capital-gains rate. The rule, however, also means investors have to keep extensive records.

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Wal-Mart Recalls 'Cuddle Care' Dolls Because They Can Burn

NPR News - Tue, 2014-03-25 10:45

The dolls get sick on cue and come with a medical kit that can relieve their symptoms. But the electronics inside the dolls can get hot enough to cause blisters or burns.

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Zimbabwe to compensate rape victim

BBC - Tue, 2014-03-25 10:44
Zimbabwe's top court orders the state to pay compensation to a rape victim who was denied an abortion after she was attacked eight years ago.

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