National / International News

Rapid breaths 'protect early babies'

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-19 14:10
Superfast ventilation - equivalent to 600 breaths per minute - is the best way to protect the lungs of premature babies, say doctors.

Tansey suspended for pushing referee

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-19 14:10
Castleford's Jordan Tansey is banned for pushing a referee, one of six players suspended for incidents at the weekend.

Manchester United 3-0 Olympiakos (agg 3-2)

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-19 14:05
Manchester United beat Olympiakos to make the Champions League last eight, easing the pressure on boss David Moyes.

Long, Hot Winter Puts Western Fire Officials On Edge

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-19 14:00

As much of California remains in a state of extreme drought, worried eyes are turning toward the coming fire season — which is expected to be particularly destructive.

» E-Mail This

Short-selling: A step-by-step guide.

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-03-19 13:51
Thursday, March 20, 2014 - 04:00 Warner Brothers Inc.

People have been shorting stocks since the early 1700s. It’s basically a way of betting against a company. It’s extremely common, and part of the fabric of Wall Street. But how, exactly, does it work?

Step 1:  You've got to be pretty sure that a company’s stock is gonna go down. Let’s say it’s ACME stock, and you suspect that the bad publicity from Wiley Coyote’s interminable failure is going to soon take its toll.

Step 2:  Before you think the stock is going to go down, you (technically, your stock broker) will borrow some of that stock. 

Step 3:  Sell it. That’s right – sell the stock that’s not even yours. So, let’s say ACME stock is at $1,000 a share, you now have $1,000. 

Step 4:  Wait for the stock price to tank. During this time, you can count your $1000. Or smell it. Or perhaps you prefer to roll in it. But remember it’s not yours to keep.

Step 5:  Does the stock actually tank? Congratulations.  Proceed to Step 6. Does the stock....rise? You might want to sit down before you proceed to Step 7.

Step 6:   Now that the stock has sunk like you (wisely) knew it would – let’s say to $1 a share – you buy it back for $1. You keep the remaining $999 you had before. Go ahead.  Smell it again. This time with passion. 'Cause all that cheddar is yours, baby!

Step 7:  Well, the stock has risen. Let’s say to $1,500. Unfortunately, you have to return the stock that you borrowed. And the only way to get it is to buy it back. At the new, higher price. I know, I know. So you take the $1,000 you made when you sold it, and then shell out $500 more, you buy the stock, and return it to whoever you borrowed it from, and it sucks.  This is your life and these are the choices you’ve made.

Step 8:  But wait! Wait! Are you a billionaire with a large personality? Are you convinced that ACME stock is worthless and the continued failure of Wiley Coyote must eventually drive the stock price over a cliff? OMG are you the ROAD RUNNER?? If you answered yes to any of those, you have a final option. Do everything you can to take ACME down. Lobby our own government and foreign ones, take out ads, fund non profit groups. Make it your mission in life. Seriously! People actually do this!

Some interesting notes about shorting: If a lot of people are shorting a company, say ACME, well, that doesn’t look good for ACME. It’s like wearing a scarlet letter. People start asking questions. The stock price can go down, in a sort of self fulfilling death spiral.


Sabri Ben-Achour

 

On the other hand, there are some investors who really like a challenge.  They might actually swoop in to rescue a company whose stock is at risk of being shorted to death, because they sense an opportunity to fix it. If they do fix it, and things start looking up for the company, all the people who shorted it will sprint to the market to buy back the shares they owe various other people and entities. Then that creates a spiral up in price. What is that called? A life spiral? Technically, it’s called a “short squeeze.”

Marketplace Morning Report for Thursday, March 20, 2014by Sabri Ben-AchourPodcast Title: Short-selling: A step-by-step guide.Story Type: News StorySyndication: Flipboard BusinessSlackerSoundcloudStitcherBusiness InsiderSwellPMPApp Respond: No

How have you lived gentrification?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-03-19 13:51
Wednesday, March 19, 2014 - 14:44 Scott Olson/Getty Images

A wrecking crew begins the demolition of the last remaining high-rise building from the infamous Cabrini-Green housing project March 30, 2011 in Chicago, Illinois. The complex once housed 15,000 residents and was notorious for its crime, gangs and drugs. 

This week on the show, Marketplace Money will be tackling gentrification. Tell us about your experience!

(function(){var qs,js,q,s,d=document,gi=d.getElementById,ce=d.createElement,gt=d.getElementsByTagName,id='typef_orm',b='https://s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/share.typeform.com/';if(!gi.call(d,id)){js=ce.call(d,'script');js.id=id;js.src=b+'widget.js';q=gt.call(d,'script')[0];q.parentNode.insertBefore(js,q)}})()by Marketplace Money StaffStory Type: BlogSyndication: PMPApp Respond: No

A letter to the President warns of history repeating itself

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-03-19 13:43
Thursday, March 20, 2014 - 04:00 NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images

Civil liberties activists hold a rally against surveillance of US citizens by the National Security Agency (NSA) at the Justice Department in Washington on January 17, 2014. The NSA's activities are at the center of legislation that internet companies are hoping to influence.

Formed in 1975 to examine the possible overreach of national security investigation and intelligence, the Church Committee - named after the chairman of the committee, Frank Church - was responsible for the creation of the Federal Intelligence Surveillance Act. At the time, the committee investigated when and how the NSA had overstepped its bounds, including the opening of people's mail without notification.

Former members of the group sent President Obama a letter this week sighting similarities between their findings during the original investigation and the current situation with NSA surveillance. In fact, they pointed out that this time around, the technology available has made the offenses much worse and larger in scope. Cyrus Farivar, senior business editor at Ars Technica, points to the increase in personal technology that the average American carries on their person.

"Typically in those days people had one phone at a fixed location: their office, their home. Nowadays, nearly all of us carry around mobile phones in our pockets which act as a really good proxy for showing where we are [and] when we are in time...I think that that’s really incredible to see these veterans of looking at some of these abuses from 40 years ago saying now that what’s going on today is far worse than what they saw previously."

Marketplace Tech for Thursday, March 20, 2014Marketplace Morning Report for Thursday, March 20, 2014by Ben JohnsonPodcast Title: A letter to the President warns of history repeating itselfStory Type: News StorySyndication: Flipboard BusinessSlackerSoundcloudStitcherBusiness InsiderSwellPMPApp Respond: No

Motherwell 2-0 Inverness CT

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-19 13:43
Scottish League Cup final runners-up Inverness Caley Thistle suffer more disappointment as they lose to Motherwell.

Where Obamacare is shunned, insurance brokers step in

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-03-19 13:39

Uninsured people only have until the end of the month to buy coverage under the Affordable Care Act if they want to avoid the new penalty for not having health insurance.

In states where politicians are dead set against Obamacare, the task of getting people enrolled is falling to a group that's only too happy to help – private insurance agents.

Despite having one of the highest rates of uninsured people in the nation, Georgia is no friend to the Affordable Care Act. Recently, the state House passed the “Georgia Health Care Freedom and ACA Noncompliance Act” by Republican State Rep. Jason Spencer.

Among other things, Spencer’s bill would nix an already modest program administered by the University of Georgia. It pays 11 people called “navigators” to help almost 2 million uninsured in Georgia buy coverage through the federal exchange.

There are, however, many more people like Helen Grove, a private insurance broker in Warner Robins, Ga.

Grove recently helped veterinary technician Andrea Wallace sign up for coverage – something she’s done for a living for almost a decade, though the process has changed of late.

“Alright, so we’ll just go to Healthcare.gov,” Grove says as she types in the web address on Wallace’s computer. The online marketplace offers a much smaller range of plans, and one of them was the clear winner for Wallace – one that comes with a reduced deductible of $3,250.

Back in her office, Grove acknowledges that just about anybody can do this on the website by themselves.

“But first of all, do you really want to? I mean some people, they are just intimidated by the whole thing,” she says.

And the best part is that brokers do this at no cost to the consumer. The insurance company pays their commission.  Except, that’s also the worst part, says Rick Chelcko, president of a health benefits consulting firm in Cleveland.

“Insurance companies give brokers not only commissions for the products they sell, but they give them lots of incentives, ‘bonuses’ or what have you,” Chelcko says. “That motivates brokers to concentrate business with a particular favored carrier.”

Officials in Florida are investigating a brokerage firm for allegedly holding “Obamacare Enrollment Team” events without disclosing ties to particular insurers. But any broker who shoves clients toward the company with the best bonuses isn’t going to last long, Grove says.

“People can see that,” she says. “You build a reputation.”

And in Grove’s politically conservative market, insurance brokers are often the only source of real information, she says.

“I did have one person, I had spoken with his wife at length, and then when I went out to speak he said, ‘Whoa, I didn’t know this was gonna be Obamacare,’” Grove recalls. 

Grove had to break it to the guy – all insurance is Obamacare now.

Where Obamacare is shunned, insurance brokers step in

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-03-19 13:39

Uninsured people only have until the end of the month to buy coverage under the Affordable Care Act if they want to avoid the new penalty for not having health insurance.

In states where politicians are dead set against Obamacare, the task of getting people enrolled is falling to a group that's only too happy to help – private insurance agents.

Despite having one of the highest rates of uninsured people in the nation, Georgia is no friend to the Affordable Care Act. Recently, the state House passed the “Georgia Health Care Freedom and ACA Noncompliance Act” by Republican State Rep. Jason Spencer.

Among other things, Spencer’s bill would nix an already modest program administered by the University of Georgia. It pays 11 people called “navigators” to help almost 2 million uninsured in Georgia buy coverage through the federal exchange.

There are, however, many more people like Helen Grove, a private insurance broker in Warner Robins, Ga.

Grove recently helped veterinary technician Andrea Wallace sign up for coverage – something she’s done for a living for almost a decade, though the process has changed of late.

“Alright, so we’ll just go to Healthcare.gov,” Grove says as she types in the web address on Wallace’s computer. The online marketplace offers a much smaller range of plans, and one of them was the clear winner for Wallace – one that comes with a reduced deductible of $3,250.

Back in her office, Grove acknowledges that just about anybody can do this on the website by themselves.

“But first of all, do you really want to? I mean some people, they are just intimidated by the whole thing,” she says.

And the best part is that brokers do this at no cost to the consumer. The insurance company pays their commission.  Except, that’s also the worst part, says Rick Chelcko, president of a health benefits consulting firm in Cleveland.

“Insurance companies give brokers not only commissions for the products they sell, but they give them lots of incentives, ‘bonuses’ or what have you,” Chelcko says. “That motivates brokers to concentrate business with a particular favored carrier.”

Officials in Florida are investigating a brokerage firm for allegedly holding “Obamacare Enrollment Team” events without disclosing ties to particular insurers. But any broker who shoves clients toward the company with the best bonuses isn’t going to last long, Grove says.

“People can see that,” she says. “You build a reputation.”

And in Grove’s politically conservative market, insurance brokers are often the only source of real information, she says.

“I did have one person, I had spoken with his wife at length, and then when I went out to speak he said, ‘Whoa, I didn’t know this was gonna be Obamacare,’” Grove recalls. 

Grove had to break it to the guy – all insurance is Obamacare now.

MP demands health board resignations

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-19 13:28
Labour MP Ann Clwyd calls for the chair and chief executive of a health board to resign claiming it released private details on the investigation into the death of her husband in hospital.

Al-Qaida Spokesman: I Warned Bin Laden That U.S. Would Kill Him

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-19 13:16

Sulaiman Abu Ghaith took the stand in a Manhattan court on Wednesday. He said that in a conversation with the al-Qaida leader he predicted the U.S. "will not settle until it kills you."

» E-Mail This

Why Ukraine's Situation Makes Russia's Other Neighbors Nervous

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-19 13:12

From the Baltic states to Central Asia, plenty of former Soviet satellites have large populations of ethnic Russians — and more than a few of them are yearning to be free.

» E-Mail This

Smith College president talks affordable education

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-03-19 12:53
Wednesday, March 19, 2014 - 15:51 Wikimedia Commons

A postcard of Smith College back in 1923.

What’s  it like to run the institutions that are on the front lines of the debate we're having in this country over higher education and its merits?

Kathleen McCartney, who  just took over as the president of Smith College a little less than six months ago, says cost is a big part of her thinking.

She said one of her main focuses is making a college education affordable for low-income students. McCartney comes from a middle-class family and is the oldest of five children.  She attended Tufts University because of generous financial aid, and says the country needs to make sure students from a background like hers can go to the best schools, no matter the cost.

“We have students who are going to be enrolling at Smith next year who went to charter schools, just from the lowest of low families,” said McCartney. “So we’re doing as much outreach as we can, and I know that other colleges are doing the same.”

 McCartney said one thing students and families need to do is think past the “sticker price” of a college education.

"I think we have to educate families, because some colleges are not a good bargain," said McCartney.  "What parents and students need to do is find things out like ‘How much debt does the average student leave this college with?'"

 

Marketplace for Wednesday March 19, 2014Interview by Kai RyssdalPodcast Title: Smith College president talks affordable educationStory Type: InterviewSyndication: SlackerSoundcloudStitcherSwellPMPApp Respond: No

Smith College president talks affordable education

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-03-19 12:51

What’s  it like to run the institutions that are on the front lines of the debate we're having in this country over higher education and its merits?

Kathleen McCartney, who  just took over as the president of Smith College a little less than six months ago, says cost is a big part of her thinking.

She said one of her main focuses is making a college education affordable for low-income students. McCartney comes from a middle-class family and is the oldest of five children.  She attended Tufts University because of generous financial aid, and says the country needs to make sure students from a background like hers can go to the best schools, no matter the cost.

“We have students who are going to be enrolling at Smith next year who went to charter schools, just from the lowest of low families,” said McCartney. “So we’re doing as much outreach as we can, and I know that other colleges are doing the same.”

 McCartney said one thing students and families need to do is think past the “sticker price” of a college education.

"I think we have to educate families, because some colleges are not a good bargain," said McCartney.  "What parents and students need to do is find things out like ‘How much debt does the average student leave this college with?'"

 

Ad For Surgical Robot Violated University of Illinois Policies

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-19 12:50

A medical center surgical team endorsed the da Vinci robot in an advertisement that ran in The New York Times Magazine in January. A university review found no fraud but said rules weren't followed.

» E-Mail This

I want to play in four World Cups - Adam Jones

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-19 12:22
In his BBC column, prop Adam Jones says he has an ambition to reach 100 Wales caps and play in four Rugby World Cups

Bungling burglar snared by selfie

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-19 12:22
A bungling thief who sent a picture of himself burgling a house to his victim's colleagues is jailed.

In First Press Conference, New Fed Chair Goes Vague

NPR News - Wed, 2014-03-19 12:20

In her first press conference as chair of the Federal Reserve, Janet Yellen pledged to keep interest rates low, but at times she wavered in word choice.

» E-Mail This

Bin Laden spokesman speaks at trial

BBC - Wed, 2014-03-19 12:16
A man US prosecutors say was al-Qaeda's spokesman after 9/11 testifies Osama Bin Laden wanted him "to deliver a message to the world".

KBBI is Powered by Active Listeners like You

As we celebrate 35 years of broadcasting, we look ahead to technology improvements and the changing landscape of public radio.

Support the voices, music, information, and ideas that add so much to your life. Renew here or visit KBBI by April 21 to enter to win one round-trip airfare with Era between Homer and Anchorage. Thank you for supporting your local public radio station.

ON THE AIR

FOLLOW US

Drupal theme by pixeljets.com ver.1.4