National / International News

Twitter #music pulled from App Store

BBC - Mon, 2014-03-24 01:43
The artist and song discovery service is pulled from Apple's App Store and will close on 18 April.

Flight MH370: Richard Westcott Q&A

BBC - Mon, 2014-03-24 01:27
Ask the BBC's Richard Westcott your flight MH370 questions

China wants explanation on US spying

BBC - Mon, 2014-03-24 01:23
China demands a clear explanation from the United States following reports that it infiltrated the servers of the Chinese telecoms giant, Huawei.

Woods gun murder suspect arrested

BBC - Mon, 2014-03-24 01:20
A 31-year-old man is arrested on suspicion of the murder of a man who was found dead in woods in Leeds after being shot.

Missing plane: China spots 'objects'

BBC - Mon, 2014-03-24 01:15
A Chinese plane spots possible debris as more nations join the search for the missing Malaysian plane in the southern Indian Ocean.

Natural gas could help Cyprus' economic growth

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-03-24 01:00

It's been one year since the second largest bank in Cyprus, Laiki Bank, was shut down leading to a $13 billion European Union bailout.  The country's financial services sector was a big part of the economy and its resulting overhaul lead many bank depositors to lose a chunk of their savings. The BBC's Lucy Burton joins Marketplace Morning Report host David Brancaccio to explain how the country is doing one year later -- and how it hopes to recover. 

From Marketplace.org, a look at previous coverage about Cyprus:

-Lessons from Cyprus: How to work without cash
-How the Cyprus crisis has some thinking of Bitcoin
-Where will money launderers go after Cyprus

The economic benefits of attending the G-8 summit

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-03-24 01:00

The future of the G-8 is in question, as seven of its eight members meet in the Netherlands. Russia, which annexed Crimea last week, didn't get an invite.

According to Ian Hurd, an associate professor of political science at Northwestern University, Russia could lose its permanent membership.  

"I think there is a lot of value in symbolic terms to having a seat at the table," Hurd says.

But Eswar Prasad, a professor of international economics at Cornell University, says the G-8's influence has waned, and the G-20, which includes emerging economies, has become more important. There's an irony here, he says.

"This particular grouping takes on more significance when it excludes somebody," Prasad says, "rather than when it includes somebody."

Starbucks is expanding serving alcohol and small plates

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-03-24 01:00

The coffee giant Starbucks has announced plans to expand the number of shops that sell the alcoholic beverages from several dozen today to 40 by the end of the year. With this come practical costs like liquor licenses, training staff, washing dishes – but former Starbucks executive John Moore, who runs the marketing consultancy Brains on Fire, says here’s the big concern: "There is an old saying that is so true. There is no ‘and’ in brand.’ If you try to stand for everything, you ultimately stand for nothing,” he says.

This beer and wine move comes after Starbucks spent hundreds of millions to expand its reach into juice, baked goods and tea. The risk, says Moore, a diluted brand – a word no coffee company ever wants to touch.

25 Years After Spill, Alaska Town Struggles Back From 'Dead Zone'

NPR News - Mon, 2014-03-24 01:00

The tiny fishing town of Cordova, Alaska, has weathered disruption in every facet of life since an oil tanker ran aground in 1989, spilling millions of gallons of oil into Prince William Sound.

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Student loans face timebomb - Labour

BBC - Mon, 2014-03-24 00:55
The coalition faces a "student loans timebomb" which could prove "catastrophic" for the Lib Dems, Labour warns.

Leaving the comfort zone to learn computer code

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-03-24 00:38

After eight years, Patsy Price had grown bored of working as a program manager at Google.

"I got more and more responsibility and higher-visibility projects, but I was further away from the technology," she said. "I was managing teams, but I got really jealous of the software engineers who were developing all the cool products."

So last spring Ms. Price quit to embark on a new career. "When people learned I had quit Google, they didn't believe people actually quit Google," she said. "I said, yes, they do because Google opens your eyes about what is possible."

This may sound like another story of a Silicon Valley executive weary of the long days of a manager at a technology giant, despite the high salary, and intent on seeking opportunities elsewhere, but Ms. Price's story is different. She was not among the early Google employees who could take their millions and never work again. She was 57, married with three children and two grandchildren and had enough money to live for six months without a paycheck.

She quit Google to learn how to be a computer programmer, or coder, in tech parlance. It's a hot job with a median salary of $74,280, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Yet Ms. Price was giving up seniority and a solid six-figure paycheck as she approached 60 to break into an industry that is overwhelmingly young, male and unencumbered with family commitments.

"This was a huge risk," she said. "I was leaving a great job and I would be making half the money I was making before. But I wanted marketable skills."

She had two motives: She missed her early career, when she worked fabricating silicon chips for computers, and she wanted a career where she could continue working for another decade or more.

So she applied to several coding boot camps — think cram sessions — and was accepted into the 12-week intensive web development program in San Francisco at one of them, General Assembly.

She became one of the thousands who each year are trying coding as a new career. While most are in their late 20s and early 30s, the schools say there is a cadre of people in their 40s and 50s who have either grown tired of their current careers or see coding as the way to job security.

"We've gotten a lot of feedback from employers that they love that, while they have coding skills, they have another well of experience to draw on," said Jake Schwartz, co-founder and chief executive of General Assembly, which has five campuses in the United States as well as ones in London, Hong Kong and Sydney.

Mr. Schwartz said the school's enrollment has grown quickly, with 1,700 in its immersive programs this quarter, up from 1,150 in the fourth quarter of 2013. The cost for the web developer course is $11,500.

While General Assembly's New York campus in the Flatiron District is a series of open, loft spaces with walls used as white boards for marking and nooks for collaborating, it functions more like a 19th century guild, where developers pass the craft on to newbies.

"When we started we thought we needed all of these business professors to lend validity to the program," said Mr. Schwartz, 35, who taught himself to code. "What our students really wanted were practitioners who were really active in their fields giving their perspective on what is important."

When the students finish, he said, the school works hard to find them jobs. He said it had a 95 percent placement rate within three months of graduating.

For those students who need more initial training, General Assembly has an apprenticeship program where they work at a company four days a week and return for course work on Fridays.

Adam Enbar, co-founder and chief executive of the Flatiron School, another coding boot camp, said he wanted to test how teachable coding was to people without a background in computer science or engineering. He deliberately mixed people from all walks of life in the school's first class.

"We had a boxer, an investment banker, a professional poker player, an NPR producer," he said. "We made it diverse and they all got jobs."

For middle-age people who want to understand coding but not become coders there are other options. Decoded offers one-day classes for $1,495. It also holds classes for companies that want employees to understand coding.

The intensive programs are careful not to make their promises too grand. There is only so much someone can learn in a few months. "We're trying to teach them to walk into a company and be productive and add value," Mr. Enbar said. "What do we need to teach them so they're productive and continue to learn for years?"

When Ms. Price finished the General Assembly program, which she found intense and difficult, she had a job. While she never expected to learn how to code well enough to return to Google, she knew there were plenty of small companies that needed solid, competent programmers.

"I'm a 1956 T-Bird and up against Maseratis, Ferraris and Priuses," she said. "I wasn't the best coder in my class. But as a newbie coder I've been given opportunity and I'm asked for my opinion."

And since she switched careers not to make more money in the short term but to continue working into her 60s, she made sure companies knew that she expected to start at the bottom.

In her interview at SmartZip, which makes a real estate app aimed at real estate agents, she was asked how much she earned at Google. "I said, 'That's irrelevant,'" Ms. Price said. "You're hiring me to be junior developer and junior developers make between $60,000 and $80,000 a year." She got the job.

But like any field that attracts people changing careers, old or young, some people come to coding in search of a career that will stick. Raymond Gan, who has a degree in chemical engineering, had five careers — from web developer to surgical neurophysiologist — before he enrolled in the developer class at the Flatiron School.

"I realized from my coding experience years ago that what I really enjoyed was consulting," said Mr. Gan, from Quito, Ecuador. Mr. Gan, who asked that his exact age not be published, said he was confident that this career would stick. "This is both sides of my personality," he said. "You can be introverted and extroverted as a software consultant. You can talk to people and then you can go and build something."

While Ms. Price had spent her career at technology companies and Mr. Gan had an engineering background, there are people with apparently less relevant backgrounds.

Tim LaTorre, 42, had worked in graphic design, mostly for Nautica, the clothing and apparel company, off and on for nearly 20 years. He said he was inspired to learn how to code after he had an idea for a travel app that he couldn't bring to fruition without coding skills.

After attending a talk at General Assembly, he decided to apply. From the start, though, he felt out of his league in class. "Half of us were what I call Muggles," he said, referring to the people in the "Harry Potter" stories who are born to nonmagical families.

Work in America: Our special series in partnership with the New York Times looking at how the improvements in technology, combined with companies’ increased ability to outsource, have conspired to make radical changes to work in America.

 

But he kept at it, even though he struggled. His goal was never to be a hard-core coder but to merge his design background with his coding skills to get a job in technology. He now works for Sailthru, an email marketing company.

For people like Ms. Price being a coder is a badge of honor. "My husband thought I was crazy that I'd be doing a job for half the money," she said. "But I'm five times happier doing this, and I'll be making that money again."

David Brancaccio: Maybe you've been thinking about a career change lately. As part of our collaboration with the New York Times, reporter Paul Sullivan takes a look at some mid-career switchers who are learning to code. 

PAUL SULLIVAN: Last May, at age 57, Patsy Price walked away from a good mid-level management job at Google to learn to code.

PATSY PRICE: My job was pretty great, but I felt obsolete.

SULLIVAN: So Price signed up for an intensive twelve-week class at General Assembly, one of a handful of new schools around the country where you can learn to code, quickly - sometimes in a day, sometimes weeks. It wasn't easy. The code was hard to learn and the grandmother of two found the students were a lot younger.

PRICE: I like to think of myself as a 1956 T-bird and going in and competing against Maseratis, Ferraris, Priuses and coding wizards, really.

SULLIVAN: Wizards indeed. Tim LaTorre, another mid-career switcher at 42, spoke to me in a General Assembly classroom. He described the age difference in his coding class as a little Harry Potter-esque.

TIM LATORRE: Half of us were what I call Muggles, normal people probably coming from a different discipline. And the other half of the class were who I'd call Wizards. Usually younger and they could pick up coding so much quicker.

SULLIVAN: LaTorre says he struggled to keep up with the intense pace. A turning point came when he was assigned to work in a group of six on a project: three wizards, three muggles.

LATORRE: And the wizards just took off. They left us for dead.

SULLIVAN: LaTorre dug in and made it through. And when it was over, he quickly got a job at a start-up focused on personalized marketing. In the interview, he says he could see the hiring manager's eyes light up when LaTorre mentioned his previous fifteen years as a graphic designer.

JAKE SCHWARTZ: That richness of experience combined with the skills can really be a core asset.

Jake Schwartz is the CEO and co-founder of General Assembly. He says the hardest part for mid-career switchers can be just hanging in there when the coding gets tough.

SCHWARTZ: It does involve a certain amount of making yourself vulnerable when you go back to the classroom after many years.

SULLIVAN: Patsy Price - the 57-year-old former Googler - says she learned that lesson quickly.

PRICE: I just needed to give myself permission to listen and learn and not hold myself up to their standard. If I did, I would have been just crushed and I would have quit.

SULLIVAN: Price is now a junior developer at SmartZip - a real estate app company. She says one of the reasons she loves this new job is because she can be so useful now that she can code. 

PRICE: I'm basically making half of what I made a year ago, but I'm four times happier. 

SULLIVAN: And isn't that what retraining is all about? I'm Paul Sullivan for Marketplace.

Learning to code

Marketplace - American Public Media - Mon, 2014-03-24 00:38

After eight years, Patsy Price had grown bored of working as a program manager at Google.

"I got more and more responsibility and higher-visibility projects, but I was further away from the technology," she said. "I was managing teams, but I got really jealous of the software engineers who were developing all the cool products."

So last spring Ms. Price quit to embark on a new career. "When people learned I had quit Google, they didn't believe people actually quit Google," she said. "I said, yes, they do because Google opens your eyes about what is possible."

This may sound like another story of a Silicon Valley executive weary of the long days of a manager at a technology giant, despite the high salary, and intent on seeking opportunities elsewhere, but Ms. Price's story is different. She was not among the early Google employees who could take their millions and never work again. She was 57, married with three children and two grandchildren and had enough money to live for six months without a paycheck.

She quit Google to learn how to be a computer programmer, or coder, in tech parlance. It's a hot job with a median salary of $74,280, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Yet Ms. Price was giving up seniority and a solid six-figure paycheck as she approached 60 to break into an industry that is overwhelmingly young, male and unencumbered with family commitments.

"This was a huge risk," she said. "I was leaving a great job and I would be making half the money I was making before. But I wanted marketable skills."

She had two motives: She missed her early career, when she worked fabricating silicon chips for computers, and she wanted a career where she could continue working for another decade or more.

So she applied to several coding boot camps — think cram sessions — and was accepted into the 12-week intensive web development program in San Francisco at one of them, General Assembly.

She became one of the thousands who each year are trying coding as a new career. While most are in their late 20s and early 30s, the schools say there is a cadre of people in their 40s and 50s who have either grown tired of their current careers or see coding as the way to job security.

"We've gotten a lot of feedback from employers that they love that, while they have coding skills, they have another well of experience to draw on," said Jake Schwartz, co-founder and chief executive of General Assembly, which has five campuses in the United States as well as ones in London, Hong Kong and Sydney.

Mr. Schwartz said the school's enrollment has grown quickly, with 1,700 in its immersive programs this quarter, up from 1,150 in the fourth quarter of 2013. The cost for the web developer course is $11,500.

While General Assembly's New York campus in the Flatiron District is a series of open, loft spaces with walls used as white boards for marking and nooks for collaborating, it functions more like a 19th century guild, where developers pass the craft on to newbies.

"When we started we thought we needed all of these business professors to lend validity to the program," said Mr. Schwartz, 35, who taught himself to code. "What our students really wanted were practitioners who were really active in their fields giving their perspective on what is important."

When the students finish, he said, the school works hard to find them jobs. He said it had a 95 percent placement rate within three months of graduating.

For those students who need more initial training, General Assembly has an apprenticeship program where they work at a company four days a week and return for course work on Fridays.

Adam Enbar, co-founder and chief executive of the Flatiron School, another coding boot camp, said he wanted to test how teachable coding was to people without a background in computer science or engineering. He deliberately mixed people from all walks of life in the school's first class.

"We had a boxer, an investment banker, a professional poker player, an NPR producer," he said. "We made it diverse and they all got jobs."

For middle-age people who want to understand coding but not become coders there are other options. Decoded offers one-day classes for $1,495. It also holds classes for companies that want employees to understand coding.

The intensive programs are careful not to make their promises too grand. There is only so much someone can learn in a few months. "We're trying to teach them to walk into a company and be productive and add value," Mr. Enbar said. "What do we need to teach them so they're productive and continue to learn for years?"

When Ms. Price finished the General Assembly program, which she found intense and difficult, she had a job. While she never expected to learn how to code well enough to return to Google, she knew there were plenty of small companies that needed solid, competent programmers.

"I'm a 1956 T-Bird and up against Maseratis, Ferraris and Priuses," she said. "I wasn't the best coder in my class. But as a newbie coder I've been given opportunity and I'm asked for my opinion."

And since she switched careers not to make more money in the short term but to continue working into her 60s, she made sure companies knew that she expected to start at the bottom.

In her interview at SmartZip, which makes a real estate app aimed at real estate agents, she was asked how much she earned at Google. "I said, 'That's irrelevant,'" Ms. Price said. "You're hiring me to be junior developer and junior developers make between $60,000 and $80,000 a year." She got the job.

But like any field that attracts people changing careers, old or young, some people come to coding in search of a career that will stick. Raymond Gan, who has a degree in chemical engineering, had five careers — from web developer to surgical neurophysiologist — before he enrolled in the developer class at the Flatiron School.

"I realized from my coding experience years ago that what I really enjoyed was consulting," said Mr. Gan, from Quito, Ecuador. Mr. Gan, who asked that his exact age not be published, said he was confident that this career would stick. "This is both sides of my personality," he said. "You can be introverted and extroverted as a software consultant. You can talk to people and then you can go and build something."

While Ms. Price had spent her career at technology companies and Mr. Gan had an engineering background, there are people with apparently less relevant backgrounds.

Tim LaTorre, 42, had worked in graphic design, mostly for Nautica, the clothing and apparel company, off and on for nearly 20 years. He said he was inspired to learn how to code after he had an idea for a travel app that he couldn't bring to fruition without coding skills.

After attending a talk at General Assembly, he decided to apply. From the start, though, he felt out of his league in class. "Half of us were what I call Muggles," he said, referring to the people in the "Harry Potter" stories who are born to nonmagical families.

Work in America: Our special series in partnership with the New York Times looking at how the improvements in technology, combined with companies’ increased ability to outsource, have conspired to make radical changes to work in America.

 

But he kept at it, even though he struggled. His goal was never to be a hard-core coder but to merge his design background with his coding skills to get a job in technology. He now works for Sailthru, an email marketing company.

For people like Ms. Price being a coder is a badge of honor. "My husband thought I was crazy that I'd be doing a job for half the money," she said. "But I'm five times happier doing this, and I'll be making that money again."

David Brancaccio: Maybe you've been thinking about a career change lately. As part of our collaboration with the New York Times, reporter Paul Sullivan takes a look at some mid-career switchers who are learning to code. 

PAUL SULLIVAN: Last May, at age 57, Patsy Price walked away from a good mid-level management job at Google to learn to code.

PATSY PRICE: My job was pretty great, but I felt obsolete.

SULLIVAN: So Price signed up for an intensive twelve-week class at General Assembly, one of a handful of new schools around the country where you can learn to code, quickly - sometimes in a day, sometimes weeks. It wasn't easy. The code was hard to learn and the grandmother of two found the students were a lot younger.

PRICE: I like to think of myself as a 1956 T-bird and going in and competing against Maseratis, Ferraris, Priuses and coding wizards, really.

SULLIVAN: Wizards indeed. Tim LaTorre, another mid-career switcher at 42, spoke to me in a General Assembly classroom. He described the age difference in his coding class as a little Harry Potter-esque.

TIM LATORRE: Half of us were what I call Muggles, normal people probably coming from a different discipline. And the other half of the class were who I'd call Wizards. Usually younger and they could pick up coding so much quicker.

SULLIVAN: LaTorre says he struggled to keep up with the intense pace. A turning point came when he was assigned to work in a group of six on a project: three wizards, three muggles.

LATORRE: And the wizards just took off. They left us for dead.

SULLIVAN: LaTorre dug in and made it through. And when it was over, he quickly got a job at a start-up focused on personalized marketing. In the interview, he says he could see the hiring manager's eyes light up when LaTorre mentioned his previous fifteen years as a graphic designer.

JAKE SCHWARTZ: That richness of experience combined with the skills can really be a core asset.

Jake Schwartz is the CEO and co-founder of General Assembly. He says the hardest part for mid-career switchers can be just hanging in there when the coding gets tough.

SCHWARTZ: It does involve a certain amount of making yourself vulnerable when you go back to the classroom after many years.

SULLIVAN: Patsy Price - the 57-year-old former Googler - says she learned that lesson quickly.

PRICE: I just needed to give myself permission to listen and learn and not hold myself up to their standard. If I did, I would have been just crushed and I would have quit.

SULLIVAN: Price is now a junior developer at SmartZip - a real estate app company. She says one of the reasons she loves this new job is because she can be so useful now that she can code. 

PRICE: I'm basically making half of what I made a year ago, but I'm four times happier. 

SULLIVAN: And isn't that what retraining is all about? I'm Paul Sullivan for Marketplace.

Row over 'independence' deficits

BBC - Mon, 2014-03-24 00:35
The Scottish government is challenged to update its forecast of the deficits Scotland would run if it becomes independent.

Referee decisions cost us - Ronaldo

BBC - Mon, 2014-03-24 00:27
Real Madrid forward Cristiano Ronaldo says "unbelievable decisions" cost them in Sunday's 4-3 home defeat by Barcelona.

Russian troops 'overrun Crimea base'

BBC - Mon, 2014-03-24 00:20
Russian troops seize control of a Crimean naval base at Feodosia, the third such attack in 48 hours, Ukrainian officials tell the BBC.

VIDEO: Prosthesis advance offers new hope

BBC - Mon, 2014-03-24 00:18
For many amputees, adapting to life after losing a limb is challenging - and while technology has advanced in recent years, prosthetic limbs can be uncomfortable and even painful to use.

New push for energy firm probe

BBC - Mon, 2014-03-24 00:05
Consumer group Which? and the Federation of Small Businesses are asking regulators to investigate the "broken" energy market.

AUDIO: Acid attack victim criticises police

BBC - Mon, 2014-03-24 00:05
A woman left scarred when her friend attacked her with acid discusses her ordeal, criticising the police.

Co-op Bank to raise extra £400m

BBC - Mon, 2014-03-24 00:02
The Co-op Bank plans to raise another £400m by issuing new shares following the discovery of additional costs related to past misconduct and poor documentation.

On The Mend, But Wounds Of Violence Still Scar Juarez

NPR News - Sun, 2014-03-23 23:58

Juarez, Mexico — terrifyingly violent a few years ago — is quieter now. But life across the Rio Grande from El Paso, Texas, is still difficult for many.

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