National / International News

PM: Juncker defeat not my last stand

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-27 09:54
David Cameron vows to fight on for reform in Europe despite what Labour says is a "humiliating" defeat in his battle to stop Jean-Claude Juncker getting the EU's top job.

U.K. Loses Big Vote On The Future Of Europe — Now What?

NPR News - Fri, 2014-06-27 09:48

U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron was furious when EU leaders voted to nominate Jean-Claude Juncker as head of the European Commission. It raises questions about the U.K.'s future in the EU.

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Chris Kamara catches Brazilian thief

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-27 09:40
Football pundit and former Leeds United star Chris Kamara chases down a suspected thief at the World Cup in Brazil.

Imams urge fighters to shun Syria

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-27 09:30
Imams from mosques around the UK use Friday prayers to urge young British men to avoid travelling to Syria to fight in the country's civil war.

'Broken' Ferrari sold for £10.8m

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-27 09:21
A rebuilt 1954 Ferrari sells for £10.8m in an auction at the Goodwood Festival of Speed.

Dov Charney, the World Cup and Aereo over Brunch

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-06-27 09:21

As part of the new Marketplace Weekend, Lizzie O'Leary will sit down for a weekly conversation about the topics you want to know more about and the stories you may have missed. In this, the inaugural epsiode, Lizzie sat down at Les Noces Du Figaro in downtown Los Angeles with Andrea Chang of the L.A. Times and Buzzfeed's Ken Bensinger.

The brunch discussion topics included:

1. The Supreme Court's decision on Aereo.

2. Andrea Chang's report on the exit of Dov Charney from American Apparel, the company he founded:

American Apparel founder Dov Charney was an unpredictable executive.

Although heralded as a retail innovator and an advocate for American manufacturing and fair wages, he also faced numerous sexual misconduct accusations.

Over the years, the chief executive -- who on Wednesday was ousted by American Apparel's board of directors because of "alleged misconduct" -- behaved oddly during many interviews with Times reporters. 

During a factory tour several years ago, he refused to answer questions about the company and talked repeatedly about "Sesame Street."

3. Ken Bensinger's report on U.S. soccer and the World Cup, examining the man who helped build soccer in the United States:

In the middle of 1989, suburban soccer dad Chuck Blazer had just lost his job, had no income, and was struggling with debt.

But he did have a few things going for him: He was audacious, with a keen eye for opportunity; he was a splendid salesman; and he knew a vast amount about the world’s most popular sport. Not the fine points of on-field strategy — he’d never actually played the game — but rather the business of American soccer, which was, back then, woeful. Compared to baseball, basketball, and football, soccer was a starving runt. Multiple professional leagues had flopped. TV networks couldn’t even figure out how to fit commercials into the 90-minute, time-out-free games, and they rarely bothered to broadcast the sport. The United States national team hadn’t qualified for a World Cup in nearly 40 years.

A quarter-century later, American soccer has become an athletic and economic powerhouse, due substantially to the contributions of Blazer. He helped win Major League Soccer’s first real TV contract, and just last month the MLS inked a $720 million TV deal. The U.S. national team, which he helped promote, is now a World Cup mainstay, ranked higher than powers such as France and the Netherlands. And more people in America are playing soccer than any team sport save basketball.

Dov Charney, the World Cup and Aereo over Brunch

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-06-27 09:21

As part of the new Marketplace Weekend, Lizzie O'Leary will sit down for a weekly conversation about the topics you want to know more about and the stories you may have missed. In this, the inaugural epsiode, Lizzie sat down at Les Noces Du Figaro in downtown Los Angeles with Andrea Chang of the L.A. Times and Buzzfeed's Ken Bensinger.

The brunch discussion topics included:

1. The Supreme Court's decision on Aereo.

2. Andrea Chang's report on the exit of Dov Charney from American Apparel, the company he founded:

American Apparel founder Dov Charney was an unpredictable executive.

Although heralded as a retail innovator and an advocate for American manufacturing and fair wages, he also faced numerous sexual misconduct accusations.

Over the years, the chief executive -- who on Wednesday was ousted by American Apparel's board of directors because of "alleged misconduct" -- behaved oddly during many interviews with Times reporters. 

During a factory tour several years ago, he refused to answer questions about the company and talked repeatedly about "Sesame Street."

3. Ken Bensinger's report on U.S. soccer and the World Cup, examining the man who helped build soccer in the United States:

In the middle of 1989, suburban soccer dad Chuck Blazer had just lost his job, had no income, and was struggling with debt.

But he did have a few things going for him: He was audacious, with a keen eye for opportunity; he was a splendid salesman; and he knew a vast amount about the world’s most popular sport. Not the fine points of on-field strategy — he’d never actually played the game — but rather the business of American soccer, which was, back then, woeful. Compared to baseball, basketball, and football, soccer was a starving runt. Multiple professional leagues had flopped. TV networks couldn’t even figure out how to fit commercials into the 90-minute, time-out-free games, and they rarely bothered to broadcast the sport. The United States national team hadn’t qualified for a World Cup in nearly 40 years.

A quarter-century later, American soccer has become an athletic and economic powerhouse, due substantially to the contributions of Blazer. He helped win Major League Soccer’s first real TV contract, and just last month the MLS inked a $720 million TV deal. The U.S. national team, which he helped promote, is now a World Cup mainstay, ranked higher than powers such as France and the Netherlands. And more people in America are playing soccer than any team sport save basketball.

If Aereo is dead, what's next in the evolution of TV?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-06-27 09:18

In a decision this week the Supreme Court effectively pulled the rug out from TV streamer Aereo. The company is small, but the ramifications are big.

Quartz Senior Editor Zach Seward says the decision will impact consumers and could significantly alter the fight to make TV internet-friendly:

But part of the US Copyright Act of 1976 was written explicitly to prevent cable companies from doing that. In its ruling, the court found that Aereo functions like a cable company: “Behind-the-scenes technological differences do not distinguish Aereo’s system from cable systems,” justice Stephen Breyer wrote. As a result, the court found, Aereo’s service constitutes a “public performance” of television for which it needs a copyright license. Aereo had argued that it’s more like an equipment provider: Its customers rent tiny antennas, which are connected to a DVR and attached to a very long cord. But because that cord is actually the internet, the case threatened to implicate other cloud technology, as well.   

“The Court vows that its ruling will not affect cloud-storage providers and cable-television systems,” justice Antonin Scalia wrote in a dissenting opinion, “but it cannot deliver on that promise given the imprecision of its result-driven rule.” He mocked the majority’s finding that Aereo resembles a cable company, saying it would “sow confusion for years to come.”

Underlying the back-and-forth between Scalia and Breyer is a long-running dispute about how to interpret legislative statutes like the Copyright Act. Breyer’s interpretation takes into account that Congress, in 1976, intended to prevent more-or-less exactly what Aereo is now doing. Scalia—along with justices Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas, who joined him in the dissent—think the only thing that matters is the strict text of the law.

If Aereo is dead, what's next in the evolution of TV?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-06-27 09:18

In a decision this week the Supreme Court effectively pulled the rug out from TV streamer Aereo. The company is small, but the ramifications are big.

Quartz Senior Editor Zach Seward says the decision will impact consumers and could significantly alter the fight to make TV internet-friendly:

But part of the US Copyright Act of 1976 was written explicitly to prevent cable companies from doing that. In its ruling, the court found that Aereo functions like a cable company: “Behind-the-scenes technological differences do not distinguish Aereo’s system from cable systems,” justice Stephen Breyer wrote. As a result, the court found, Aereo’s service constitutes a “public performance” of television for which it needs a copyright license. Aereo had argued that it’s more like an equipment provider: Its customers rent tiny antennas, which are connected to a DVR and attached to a very long cord. But because that cord is actually the internet, the case threatened to implicate other cloud technology, as well.   

“The Court vows that its ruling will not affect cloud-storage providers and cable-television systems,” justice Antonin Scalia wrote in a dissenting opinion, “but it cannot deliver on that promise given the imprecision of its result-driven rule.” He mocked the majority’s finding that Aereo resembles a cable company, saying it would “sow confusion for years to come.”

Underlying the back-and-forth between Scalia and Breyer is a long-running dispute about how to interpret legislative statutes like the Copyright Act. Breyer’s interpretation takes into account that Congress, in 1976, intended to prevent more-or-less exactly what Aereo is now doing. Scalia—along with justices Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas, who joined him in the dissent—think the only thing that matters is the strict text of the law.

Friday's gossip column

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-27 09:13
Liverpool want at least £80m for Luis Suarez, Inter Milan give up on Erik Lamela, Arsenal may lose Mikel Arteta, plus more.

A Doctor Tries To Save A 9-Year-Old Stricken With Ebola

NPR News - Fri, 2014-06-27 09:08

The child was brought to a treatment center in the back of a pickup truck with his dying mother. Doctors knew his condition was dire. But they thought that maybe they could save him.

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10 things we didn't know last week

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-27 09:05
Early risers are more unethical at night, and more nuggets from the week's news.

Summit backs Juncker in blow to UK

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-27 08:51
EU leaders nominate Jean-Claude Juncker as next European Commission president, despite strong UK opposition.

Emin 'hopes' bed will go to museum

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-27 08:47
Tracey Emin "hopes" her famous artwork My Bed will end up in a museum after it is sold at auction next week.

Man charged over Salmond threats

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-27 08:47
A man appears in court in East Lothian charged in connection with online threats against Scotland's First Minister Alex Salmond.

Miliband raises border post prospect

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-27 08:30
Ed Miliband says a Labour government at Westminster would consider building border posts if Scotland voted for independence.

Every Lidl doesn't help Tesco

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-27 08:29
Every Lidl doesn't help Tesco

Former Haiti President Manigat dies

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-27 08:22
Haiti's ex-President Leslie Manigat, who served a brief term in 1988 before being ousted, has died after a long illness at the age of 83.

Winning by losing: The (un)American way?

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-27 08:18
Americans miffed by those celebrating a defeat

Ex-PM aide charged over abuse images

BBC - Fri, 2014-06-27 08:12
Patrick Rock. a former senior adviser to the prime minister, has been charged by police over child abuse images.
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