National / International News

After rescue, a question: Who owns Antarctica?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-01-02 07:33

Down in Antarctica, those researchers trapped in the ice are finally on their way home.

The rescue operation was an international one. A Chinese helicopter shuttled stranded researchers from the Russian ship to an Australian icebreaker.

International cooperation is sort of the theme in Antarctica; a place for science, not business. But considering its untapped natural resources, can Antarctica remain unpolluted by economic interests?

For a long time, there’s been speculation about the natural resources buried under Antarctica. It remains only speculation for a good reason.

“At the South Pole, the ice is over 9,000 feet thick. So even getting down to terra firma to find out whether or not there were minerals or resources there would be very difficult,” says Frank Klotz, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Klotz says the U.S. should keep a presence in Antarctica in order to maintain influence over how the continent is governed.

Under an international treaty, Antarctica is kept as an icy lab for scientists.

Ohio State University geologist Berry Lyons is headed to Antarctica next week.

“The international cooperation is probably unique. And a really good model for international cooperation,” says Lyons.

But that international model cuts both ways. For example, the governing body in Antarctica works on consensus.

“Their version of consensus is that everyone unanimously has to agree to a proposal in order for it to move forward,” says Andrea Kavanagh, director of The Pew Charitable Trusts’ Southern Ocean sanctuaries project.

She’s been working to extend protections for the marine life around Antarctica because fishing boats are finding their local waters are all fished-out.

“And that’s why Antarctica has become a great, new, lucrative fishing ground,” says Kavanagh.

The big prize in those waters is Chilean sea bass. Because of its high price per pound, fishermen call it ‘white gold.’

Instead of cooperation, there’s international competition to net the Antarctic fish.

Who owns Antarctica?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-01-02 07:33

Down in Antarctica, those researchers trapped in the ice are finally on their way home.

The rescue operation was an international one. A Chinese helicopter shuttled stranded researchers from the Russian ship to an Australian icebreaker.

International cooperation is sort of the theme in Antarctica; a place for science, not business. But considering its untapped natural resources, can Antarctica remain unpolluted by economic interests?

For a long time, there’s been speculation about the natural resources buried under Antarctica. It remains only speculation for a good reason.

“At the South Pole, the ice is over 9,000 feet thick. So even getting down to terra firma to find out whether or not there were minerals or resources there would be very difficult,” says Frank Klotz, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Klotz says the U.S. should keep a presence in Antarctica in order to maintain influence over how the continent is governed.

Under an international treaty, Antarctica is kept as an icy lab for scientists.

Ohio State University geologist Berry Lyons is headed to Antarctica next week.

“The international cooperation is probably unique. And a really good model for international cooperation,” says Lyons.

But that international model cuts both ways. For example, the governing body in Antarctica works on consensus.

“Their version of consensus is that everyone unanimously has to agree to a proposal in order for it to move forward,” says Andrea Kavanagh, director of The Pew Charitable Trusts’ Southern Ocean sanctuaries project.

She’s been working to extend protections for the marine life around Antarctica because fishing boats are finding their local waters are all fished-out.

“And that’s why Antarctica has become a great, new, lucrative fishing ground,” says Kavanagh.

The big prize in those waters is Chilean sea bass. Because of its high price per pound, fishermen call it ‘white gold.’

Instead of cooperation, there’s international competition to net the Antarctic fish.

AUDIO: Eye reflections could help solve crime

BBC - Thu, 2014-01-02 07:33
Photographers can now be identified by looking at the reflection in the eyes of people in the photo, according to research.

Premier League: 2013 in numbers

BBC - Thu, 2014-01-02 07:32
A statistical look at a year when Manchester United's Sir Alex Ferguson retired and Liverpool's Luis Suarez was the top scorer

Fan rescues child from under train

BBC - Thu, 2014-01-02 07:31
A Cardiff City fan is hailed a hero after rescuing a toddler from train tracks while on his way to the match at Arsenal.

Colorado cannabis customers swarm

BBC - Thu, 2014-01-02 07:13
Hordes of customers brave bitter cold as the world's first state-licensed marijuana industry opens for business in the US state of Colorado.

Juanita Moore, Groundbreaking Actress, Dies

NPR News - Thu, 2014-01-02 06:58

Her role as Annie Johnson in the 1959 film Imitation of Life led to an Oscar nomination — just the fifth at that time for a black actor or actress. Moore was 99 when she died on Wednesday.

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Nigella calls court case 'mortifying'

BBC - Thu, 2014-01-02 06:57
TV cook Nigella Lawson discusses the recent court case in which she was depicted as a serial cocaine abuser in her first TV interview since the verdict.

PODCAST: Fiat buys the rest of Chrysler

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-01-02 06:39

The FT100 in London is down about a tenth percent on this first day of trading in 2014. Dow, S&P and Nasdaq futures are all down. The number of people signing up for unemployment benefits dipped slightly in the last week, a hint that the job market is holding steady.

The Italian carmaker Fiat has reached a deal to buy the rest of American automaker Chrysler, something it has wanted to do for years. Fiat hopes the deal will make it easier for them to compete with companies like Toyota and Volkswagen. Perhaps more importantly, Fiat desperately needs some of Chrysler’s cash.

And, foreclosures are way down from the worst of the housing crisis. But as we start this new year, don’t be surprised if some places see a rise in foreclosure sales. That’s because foreclosures that have been slowly working their way through judicial pipelines are now coming to market. That may prove a rude awakening in some areas.

Ford reveals solar-powered car

BBC - Thu, 2014-01-02 06:37
Ford has revealed plans for a hybrid car that will be powered using a solar panel on the roof, ahead of CES 2014 in Las Vegas.

Accident Or Not? Palestinian Diplomat's Death Is A Mystery

NPR News - Thu, 2014-01-02 06:20

The Palestinian ambassador to the Czech Republic was killed Wednesday by an explosion at his home in Prague. At first, officials said he may have triggered a bomb meant to explode only if a safe was tampered with. But other officials are disputing that account.

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Train hits London station's roof

BBC - Thu, 2014-01-02 06:17
An investigation is launched after a train's overhead line connector hits the roof of a central London station, causing long delays.

BBC rejects subscription fee calls

BBC - Thu, 2014-01-02 06:15
The BBC rejects calls to introduce a voluntary subscription fee for its services as part of a government inquiry into the future of the BBC.

City search for teenager stepped up

BBC - Thu, 2014-01-02 06:14
Police have launched a large-scale operation including sniffer dogs and up to 40 officers to search for a missing 18-year-old.

Rwanda exile 'murdered' in S Africa

BBC - Thu, 2014-01-02 06:07
Exiled former Rwandan intelligence chief Patrick Karegeya was apparently murdered in South Africa, police say.

Fiat hopes Chrysler deal will help it compete with VW, Toyota

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-01-02 06:07

The Italian carmaker Fiat has reached a deal to buy the rest of American automaker Chrysler, something it has wanted to do for years.

“The main reason is it will allow them to fully integrate as one company,” says Michelle Krebs, senior analyst with Edmunds.com.

Fiat hopes the deal will make it easier for them to compete with companies like Toyota and Volkswagen. Perhaps more importantly, Fiat desperately needs some of Chrysler’s cash.

According to analyst Dave Sullivan, with AutoPacific, Europe’s anemic economy hasn’t been good for auto sales.

“Chrysler is really helping to keep Fiat afloat during these difficult times,” he says.

Fiat’s relationship with Chrysler goes back to 2009, when Chrysler was in bankruptcy.

“I mean, you could say that Fiat was basically gifted a stake in Chrysler,” Sullivan says.

The rest of the company went to the UAW Retiree Medical Benefits Trust, which had considered an IPO to sell its shares.

With this agreement, that won’t happen. The UAW will sell its ownership stake in a deal valued at more than $4 billion.

Fiat reaches deal to buy rest of Chrysler

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-01-02 06:07

The Italian carmaker Fiat has reached a deal to buy the rest of American automaker Chrysler, something it has wanted to do for years.

“The main reason is it will allow them to fully integrate as one company,” says Michelle Krebs, senior analyst with Edmunds.com.

Fiat hopes the deal will make it easier for them to compete with companies like Toyota and Volkswagen. Perhaps more importantly, Fiat desperately needs some of Chrysler’s cash.

According to analyst Dave Sullivan, with AutoPacific, Europe’s anemic economy hasn’t been good for auto sales.

“Chrysler is really helping to keep Fiat afloat during these difficult times,” he says.

Fiat’s relationship with Chrysler goes back to 2009, when Chrysler was in bankruptcy.

“I mean, you could say that Fiat was basically gifted a stake in Chrysler,” Sullivan says.

The rest of the company went to the UAW Retiree Medical Benefits Trust, which had considered an IPO to sell its shares.

With this agreement, that won’t happen. The UAW will sell its ownership stake in a deal valued at more than $4 billion.

John Lewis reports healthy sales

BBC - Thu, 2014-01-02 06:06
Store chain John Lewis reports strong sales over the Christmas period, but rival Debenhams says its chief financial officer has resigned.

VIDEO: Nigella 'mortified' by court ordeal

BBC - Thu, 2014-01-02 06:04
Nigella Lawson has spoken about the trial of two of her former assistants, who were found not guilty of fraud after a court process which saw numerous allegations about the TV cook's personal life emerge. .

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