National / International News

DWP leads the way on stats complaints

BBC - Thu, 2014-07-03 01:59
The department which leads the way on statistics complaints.

VIDEO: House of Commons

BBC - Thu, 2014-07-03 01:59
It will be free for gay couples to convert their civil partnerships to marriage, MPs are told.

VIDEO: Baby delivered by passing tourist

BBC - Thu, 2014-07-03 01:53
Money was thrown and crowds cheered as a woman gave birth outside shops in Birmingham city centre.

VIDEO: Will.i.am's new musical machines

BBC - Thu, 2014-07-03 01:48
Musician and producer Will.i.am is taking part in the Digital Revolution exhibition at the Barbican art gallery in London.

VIDEO: Spry daughter 'cannot see her again'

BBC - Thu, 2014-07-03 01:42
The adopted daughter of Eunice Spry has said she will do all she can to stop her mother being housed nearby when released from prison.

FGM failure is a 'national scandal'

BBC - Thu, 2014-07-03 01:32
The failure to tackle female genital mutilation (FGM) is a "national scandal" with as many as 170,000 victims in the UK, MPs say.

Indians tweet 'Who is Maria Sharapova?'

BBC - Thu, 2014-07-03 01:26
How Sharapova managed to stun a billion Indians

Rival 'inflation' teams to share data

BBC - Thu, 2014-07-03 01:23
Scientists on rival projects looking for evidence that the early Universe underwent a super-expansion are in discussion about working together and publishing a joint paper.

In Iraq's Sacred City Of Najaf, Clerics Call On Shiites To Fight

NPR News - Thu, 2014-07-03 01:18

Senior Shiite Muslim clerics usually stay out of politics. But they've broken with tradition and issued a call to arms. Shiites are now volunteering — and dying — in the fight against Sunni Muslims.

» E-Mail This

In Iraq's Sacred City Of Najaf, Clerics Call On Shiites To Fight

NPR News - Thu, 2014-07-03 01:18

The Shiite Muslim clerics usually stay out of politics. But they've broken with tradition and issued a call to arms. Shiites are now volunteering — and dying — in the fight against Sunni Muslims.

» E-Mail This

Study maps fracking methane risk

BBC - Thu, 2014-07-03 01:10
A major study into the potential of fracking to contaminate drinking water with methane is published, highlighting where shale deposits and aquifers coincide.

VIDEO: Secrets of plant roots revealed

BBC - Thu, 2014-07-03 01:10
Plants have been grown inside a microscope to allow scientists to watch their roots developing in 3D.

Tech and train-hopping

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-07-03 01:00

My family likes to tell stories. Sometimes they get changed and exaggerated in the retelling: Dad got chased by a grizzly. No, it was two grizzlies. It was two grizzlies and he was on a horse. Wasn't it?

But one story I know to be true, at least in its simplest form: My dad used to hop trains out west.

I remember him telling me how dangerous it was. Sometimes the train would stop where you wanted to get off, sometimes it wouldn't. You had to hit the ground running as fast as you could just to stay on your feet and avoid falling into the tracks and under the wheels.

My family is from Colorado, and this is the type of story that reminds me of our roots. 

That's why when I heard about Ted and Asa Conover's story, I had to talk to them. This father and son duo is from New York City, but they've both caught the train-hopping bug --Ted first, then Asa -- and went on an adventure together to do it.

I can vaguely remember adventures like that with my own father. Not as dangerous or as illegal, but walking the line. Linking arms so we could pull something out of the rubble at the town dump because it wasn't trash. Hopping a fence here or there. As a kid you have to learn boundaries by pushing against them, and if you're lucky you have a guardian who helps you learn how to do that and survive it. 

The interesting thing about this week's conversation with the Conovers is that technology has changed the game of train-hopping. It used to be an oral tradition of sorts -- knowing the right moves and knowing when and where a train might stop. Heck, at any given time you could be riding a train and have no real idea how far you'd traveled or how close you were to your destination. But now there are smart phones and PDF documents shared among the hoppers that detail the gathered knowledge of this illegal pastime. There's even a rumor -- almost a tech ghost story -- about a special infrared scanner that law enforcement uses to catch people train-hopping near Cheyenne, Wyoming.

Ted Conover was saying that no matter how tech has changed the process, your success still depends completely on your own ingenuity. I thought that sounded like hacking, and he agreed. 

We all see our world change as we get older, and we lament the change. School shootings make for exhaustive visitation rules. More lawyers make for neighbors who don't invite you to use their pool on a hot day. Smart phones make for staring at screens instead of interacting with and meeting strangers. In the case of train-hopping, technology seems to hinder and help; depending on how you define "bad" and "good," it's got a bit of both.

Yeah, I know hopping trains is illegal and dangerous, and I'm not trying to encourage others to do it. In fact I would discourage people from doing it (for the record, Ted Conover probably would too). But that doesn't mean it's a story we shouldn't tell. It's part of my own family history -- part that's always made me proud to have a connection to the west. Like riding horses or knowing how to start a fire in the snowpack, there's something about train-hopping that makes me feel proud of the people and place where I come from. This July 4th week, that feels just about right. 

VIDEO: Footage of eagle raiding Springwatch nest

BBC - Thu, 2014-07-03 00:44
Video shows a young sea eagle pushing the Springwatch eagle chick out of its nest in an attack never before caught on film in Scotland.

VIDEO: Politician sobs and wails at briefing

BBC - Thu, 2014-07-03 00:44
A Japanese politician Ryutaro Nonomura who wailed and sobbed when quizzed by journalists about expenses has yet to prove that he spent public funds legitimately.

What's wrong with Brazil?

BBC - Thu, 2014-07-03 00:39
Can Brazil find their spark at the World Cup?
ON THE AIR
Echoes
Next Up: @ 02:00 am
BBC World Service

KBBI is Powered by Active Listeners like You

As we celebrate 35 years of broadcasting, we look ahead to technology improvements and the changing landscape of public radio.

Support the voices, music, information, and ideas that add so much to your life.Thank you for supporting your local public radio station.

FOLLOW US

Drupal theme by pixeljets.com ver.1.4