National / International News

VIDEO: Fire destroys Brazil favela

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-03 07:45
Four people are injured in a huge fire which swept through a slum in eastern Sao Paulo on Wednesday.

Muslim school 'plot' probe 'glacial'

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-03 07:38
An investigation into an alleged plot by Muslim hard-liners to seize control of several schools in Birmingham must report immediately, an MP says.

Top doctor backs 'garden gym' idea

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-03 07:32
One of the UK's top doctors says there is an accumulating body of evidence that highlights a link between urban green space and benefits to human wellbeing.

Court In Turkey Orders Twitter Service Restored

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-03 07:29

The social media site was blocked in the runup to last Sunday's local elections, but the ban was deemed a breach of free expression and ordered reversed.

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The New One wins Aintree Hurdle

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-03 07:27
The New One, ridden by Sam Twiston-Davies, wins the Aintree Hurdle on day one of the Grand National meeting.

BSkyB: Referendum 'for the people'

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-03 07:22
Satellite broadcaster BSkyB says it has no plans to change its business in Scotland, whatever the outcome of September's independence referendum.

'Hot' Oregon Blueberry Fight Prompts Farm Bill Changes

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-03 07:15

A dispute between Beaver State blueberry farmers and workers spurred Congress to change an obscure provision in a 1938 labor law. Some fear it will delay pickers' paychecks.

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AUDIO: Does ethnic background affect grades?

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-03 07:08
White British children are being outperformed in key GCSE subjects by those who speak English as a second language.

Thursday's gossip column

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-03 06:56
Man Utd to offer £40m for Kroos, Courtois to consider future, Fulham to sack Magath, plus more

VIDEO: Train and car in level crossing smash

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-03 06:50
Four people were injured when a train smashed into a car on a level crossing in Houston, Texas.

PODCAST: Fewest first quarter layoffs since 1995

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-04-03 06:43

American companies announced fewer layoffs January to March than in any first quarter since 1995. Might that be a hint of good things to come in the month's big employment report that's on the way? We consult Diane Swonk, chief economist at Mesirow Financial in Chicago.

Also, when it comes to measuring the health of a country's economy, using the nation's Gross Domestic Product is often the barometer of choice. But as more dollars change hands, why aren't the outcomes always better? There's a new listing of 132 countries that uses 54 different indicators that together measure how well a country is doing in giving its citizens good lives. It's called the Social Progress Index. Michael Green, CEO of the Social Progress Imperative, says that although GDP is important, it doesn't tell the whole story.

Disaster 'robbed children of father'

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-03 06:39
The Hillsborough inquests jury hears from relatives of some of those who died, including a widow who says it "robbed" her five children of their father.

Security boss 'would not break law'

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-03 06:28
News International's head of security tells the phone-hacking trial that he is loyal to his employer but "would not commit a crime for anyone".

Devolved powers 'could be returned'

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-03 06:24
Devolved powers for social welfare could be handed back to Westminster, Northern Ireland's first minister suggests.

AUDIO: How the zebra got its stripes

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-03 06:24
Why do zebras have stripes? Scientists at the University of California reveal the answer.

Thousands Of Artifacts Seized At 91-Year-Old Indiana Man's Home

NPR News - Thu, 2014-04-03 06:20

The collection of items has "immeasurable" cultural value, the FBI says. Some artifacts are Native American; others are Russian and Chinese. It's unclear how many were collected legally.

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VIDEO: Plain packages' grim picture for smokers

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-03 06:04
As the government moves forward with plans to ban branding on cigarette packs in England, the BBC's Peter Taylor visits a tobacconist in Australia where a ban was introduced in 2011.

VIDEO: What if Wal-Mart paid its employees more?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-04-03 05:57

Food stamps turns 50 this year. Since the program was written in to law, it's become one of those government programs that gets a lot of attention from politicians on both the left and the right -- especially recently. 

The program has been growing furiously in the past 15 years. In fact, one in seven Americans is on food stamps today. That's more than twice what the rate was in 2000. Some of that can be explained by changing eligibility requirements and job-losses during the recession. But the fastest growing group of food stamp participants in the last few decades are people who have jobs and work full year-round.

In our series on The Secret Life of a Food Stamp, Marketplace Wealth & Poverty Desk reporter Krissy Clark reports on how big retail chains that employ these workers also themselves take in tens of billions of dollars in food stamps.

In this video, produced by our series partner Slate, we estimate how much more Wal-Mart might have to charge for some products, if it raised wages high enough that a typical worker earned too much to qualify for food stamps.

Note: Eligibility for food stamps varies according to income, number of dependents and other factors. This estimate of Walmart's potential cost from raising wages is based on wages for a Walmart employee with one dependent working 30 hours a week, a typical retail worker based on federal data.

VIDEO: What if Wal-Mart paid its employees more?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-04-03 05:57

Food stamps turns 50 this year. Since the program was written in to law, it's become one of those government programs that gets a lot of attention from politicians on both the left and the right -- especially recently. 

The program has been growing furiously in the past 15 years. In fact, one in seven Americans is on food stamps today. That's more than twice what the rate was in 2000. Some of that can be explained by changing eligibility requirements and job-losses during the recession. But the fastest growing group of food stamp participants in the last few decades are people who have jobs and work full year-round.

In our series on The Secret Life of a Food Stamp, Marketplace Wealth & Poverty Desk reporter Krissy Clark reports on how big retail chains that employ these workers also themselves take in tens of billions of dollars in food stamps.

In this video, produced by our series partner Slate, we estimate how much more Wal-Mart might have to charge for some products, if it raised wages high enough that a typical worker earned too much to qualify for food stamps.

Note: Eligibility for food stamps varies according to income, number of dependents and other factors. This estimate of Walmart's potential cost from raising wages is based on wages for a Walmart employee with one dependent working 30 hours a week, a typical retail worker based on federal data.

Nigeria ex-bank chief wins damages

BBC - Thu, 2014-04-03 05:37
A Nigerian court awards about $300,000 (£180,000) in damages to suspended central bank chief Lamido Sanusi after he files a harassment case against the government.

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