National / International News

Dinosaur chase scene reconstructed

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-02 15:43
Scientists digitally reconstruct the scene of a dinosaur chase - preserved in the mud of an ancient river bed in Texas.

U.S. Troubled By Iran's Choice Of 1979 Hostage-Taker For U.N. Post

NPR News - Wed, 2014-04-02 15:11

Iran wants Hamid Aboutalebi as its new United Nations ambassador. He was among a group of Muslim students who 35 years ago seized American diplomats in Tehran.

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Investors hunger for GrubHub

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-04-02 15:07
Friday, April 4, 2014 - 05:56 GrubHub.com screenshot

Momentum is building ahead of the initial public offering for GrubHub.

"So far this year, there have been 65 IPOs, raising $10.7 billion, a level of activity we have not seen since 2000," says Kathy Smith, a principal with Renaissance Capital, which specializes in researching and investing in IPOs.

In the case of GrubHub, Smith says sales are growing by more than 40 percent. 

And with more people using smartphones, the number of consumers using GrubHub could keep growing.

But GrubHub also faces potential challenges from other Internet companies like Yelp and Google.

“All these companies could theoretically can come in and say, ‘Hey, we’re going to be competing against you. Watch out.’ That’s their biggest worry,” says Peter Krasilovsky, a senior analyst with the media-research firm BIA/Kelsey.

Marketplace Morning Report for Friday April 4, 2014by Jeff TylerPodcast Title: Investors hunger for GrubHub Story Type: News StorySyndication: SlackerSoundcloudStitcherSwellPMPApp Respond: No

VIDEO: Jude Law on getting older

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-02 15:02
Jude Law talks to Talking Movies' Tom Brook about the freedom of taking on different screen roles as he gets older.

Police convicted of data breaches

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-02 15:01
An increasing number of Scottish police officers are being investigated for breaching data protection laws, BBC Scotland learns.

How American energy independence could change the world

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-02 15:00
How America being self-sufficient in energy could change the world

Warren Buffett's advice: Tweet cats

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-04-02 14:59
Wednesday, April 2, 2014 - 17:12 Kabukicho Shinjuku/Flickr

We're just taking Warren Buffett's advice.

In a video produced by his alma mater, the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Warren Buffett advises the chancellor on what to tweet.   Yeah. Cats.   Marketplace for Wednesday April 2, 2014by David GuraPodcast Title: Warren Buffett's advice: Tweet catsStory Type: News StorySyndication: SlackerSoundcloudStitcherSwellPMPApp Respond: No

Goal was a ridiculous joke - Mourinho

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-02 14:45
Chelsea boss Jose Mourinho says some of his side's defending was "a joke" in their 3-1 Champions League defeat by PSG.

Campaign Finance Ruling Winners: The Political Pros

NPR News - Wed, 2014-04-02 14:36

In practical terms, the Supreme Court ruling could mean more money flowing to political operatives and party committees.

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VIDEO: UK Coal miners face job losses

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-02 14:28
The UK's largest coal producer, UK Coal, is to cut 1,300 jobs and two mines as it battles to stave off insolvency.

Shooting At Fort Hood Leaves 4 Dead, 16 Injured

NPR News - Wed, 2014-04-02 14:27

The suspected shooter at the Texas Army post is Ivan Lopez, a Pentagon official tells NPR. Authorities say he was being evaluated for PTSD and treated for depression.

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VIDEO: Stolen art recovered in Italy

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-02 14:24
Paintings by Paul Gauguin and Pierre Bonnard hung on an Italian factory worker's kitchen wall for almost 40 years after being stolen, police reveal.

Warren Buffett's advice: Tweet cats

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-04-02 14:12

In a video produced by his alma mater, the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Warren Buffett advises the chancellor on what to tweet.   Yeah. Cats.  

VIDEO: Student deported to Mauritius

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-02 14:07
A High Court judge has refused to grant an emergency injunction to block the removal of an A-Level student from north London back to Mauritius.

VIDEO: Why are chocolate bars shrinking?

BBC - Wed, 2014-04-02 13:59
Consumers are starting to notice that although they are paying the same, some food items they buy are getting smaller.

Lagarde: Global recovery hinges on IMF reforms

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-04-02 13:57
Wednesday, April 2, 2014 - 16:36 BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images

Without U.S. support for reforms of institutions like the International Monetary Fund, global recovery from the financial crisis will likely continue at an unacceptably slow place, the head of the IMF says.

In an interview with PBS NewsHour's Judy Woodruff on Wednesday, Christine Lagarde, the managing director of the IMF, discussed the decision by lawmakers to pass an aid package to Ukraine but dropped sections of legislation regarding IMF reforms that would "make a bit more space for China," as Lagarde says. The failed provisions were supported by both the Treasury Department and Lagarde (prompting this op-ed written by Lagarde in the Wall Street Journal in late March), but raised the ire of Republicans and Democrats in Washington, including Speaker of the House John Boehner. 

The IMF will release a revised version of its global economic outlook next week, which is expected to show a slight upward trend in activity, but Lagarde says that even talk of global reforms, such as sanctions on Russia in response to activities in Ukraine and Crimea, points to the continued powerful role of U.S. involvement: 

Delays in implementing IMF-suggested governmental reforms in countries such as Ukraine will result in global economic growth slowing down in kind, she noted. 

“The U.S. was one of the founding partner[s] of the IMF, and it is the leading shareholder of the institution. No matter what is said, the United States will keep its veto right over decisions that are made in this institution. So to make a bit more space for China or for the emerging market economies is only representative of where the world is going.  And we have to be the institution of the future or serve international cooperation with the constant solid leadership of the United States of America. Not exercising that leadership is a mistake.”

Whether U.S. lawmakers agree with Lagarde that supporting IMF-suggested policy is or is not an act of leadership is up for debate. 

Watch the full interview here, courtesy of PBS NewsHour.

Lagarde continues her public speaking tour prior to the IMF's latest outlook on Thursday, April 3 at the Women in the World conference, which you can watch here

by Margarita NoriegaStory Type: BlogSyndication: PMPApp Respond: No

Traders Defend High-Speed Systems Against Charges Of Rigging

NPR News - Wed, 2014-04-02 13:51

Author Michael Lewis says high-frequency traders have figured out a way to game the system. Some of those traders say that while there are "bad actors," high-speed trading plays a legitimate role.

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What to do when healthcare isn't enough

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-04-02 13:50
Thursday, April 3, 2014 - 15:48 Jessica Kourkounis

“I wish I could get better and get all this cleared and get me a job and work,” Garcia says.

We were all trying to breathe through our mouths, and despite his obvious pain, 45-year-old Mariano Garcia sat transfixed, watching his podiatrist Dr. David Millili cut through the bandages wrapped around Garcia's left calf.

It was one of those moments that takes forever, the smell filling the air. As the dressings came off, the room went quiet.

Garcia gagged, and Millili balked.

“I don’t have access to treat this right,” Millili said. “I don’t see any maggots or anything. I’m not dealing with this.”

Millili turned to Garcia:  “When was the last time the bandages were changed?”

“Last time I was here,” Garcia said.

Millili was incredulous. “Really? A week?” he said.

Jessica Kourkounis

Millili changing Garcia's bandages.

Garcia’s been coming to Cooper University Hospital in Camden, N.J. for two years now, and everybody in the exam room knows exactly what needs to happen: Those bandages must get changed daily. But no matter how simple it sounds, it’s not happening.

Garcia says it hurts him too much to do it, and visiting nurses say they don’t feel safe going to his neighborhood. Frustrated and defeated, Millili has one choice right now, but he knows sending Garcia to the hospital is just a temporary fix.

“When we finally get things turned in the right direction again for him, how do we keep it that way?” Millili says. “Three weeks after he leaves the hospital, why are we not in the same situation? I can’t control infection. I can’t control pain. I can’t control these wounds.”

The doctor is talking about Garcia, but he may as well be talking about one of the biggest puzzles in this new era of healthcare. How can doctors keep people healthy when they have almost no control over what happens outside the four walls of the hospital?

It’s the edge of the healthcare world.

“A lot of clinical care is kind of like the tree falling in the forest,” saysRebecca Onie who runs the non-profit Health Leads, which works with medical providers to connect their patients to social services. “For example, a patient will come in to manage her diabetes but needs to refrigerate her medication and hasn’t had electricity for six weeks.”

Onie says now that hospitals either must drive down costs, or face what could be crippling financial penalties. Healthcare executives must leave the medical map behind and head out for the uncharted territory.

“They are going to have to begin paying for a set of things that have historically [been] considered outside the scope of traditional healthcare,” she says.

And so we are beginning to see healthcare’s first, hesitant steps, where doctors and hospitals wade into the world of social services. 

Health Leads works with 20 providers, serving some 15,000 families. Kaiser Permanente, one of the top health systems, has several pilot programs, including one in Oregon where ambulance staff act more like social workers – helping solve would-be domestic problems, and avoiding trips to the ER.

“We spend almost 1.5 times more than the next most expensive country and yet our health outcomes are among the very worst in all high income countries,” says Yale public health professor Elizabeth Bradley.

She says it’s no mystery that education, poverty and safety have more to do with a person’s overall health than medical care does. In her book last fall, Bradley and her co-author, Lauren Taylor, found people in countries that spend less on medical care but more on social services were healthier than people in the United States.

“The major reason we are not doing better... the unnamed culprit is that we are probably spending less on the social services than is necessary,” Bradley says.

This social service healthcare frontier isn’t as popular as the California Gold Rush, but it's close. It’s on the tip of tongues at healthcare conferences. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation identified it earlier this year as one of three critical steps to move healthcare forward. Even the nation’s largest healthcare program for the poor – Medicaid – has signaled its willingness to pay for some care outside the traditional stuff -- for example, air conditioners for asthmatics.

“We recognize that it can’t just be the office visit,” says Dr. Stephen Cha, the chief medical officer for Medicaid. “That’s the core of it, but we have to think about when we face this patient, we are looking at much more than just what we can do in that 15-minute span.”

In this first wave of programs, insurers aren’t paying for job training, hospitals aren’t moving families out of dangerous neighborhoods. But if interventions save money, then the game changes.

Kaiser Permanente’s Raymond Baxter, who oversees several non-medical projects, including the paramedic pilot, says it’s early, but that he sees promise.

“We are now adding a cost to the system in the short term,” he says. “However, if that intervention averts a series of visits to emergency rooms, in the long run you are going to see some real gains here.

Harvard health economist Amitabh Chandra has his doubts. Providers can only save money if they can pinpoint which patients truly benefit – a tall order – he says.

“I think of that as analogous to the man mission to Mars,” Chandra says. “It’s something that can be done. There is no theorem in economics or statistics that says it’s not possible. But you need absolutely terrific data to be able to make that happen. And I’ve just never seen it.”

Chandra’s driving at the X-Factor so often at the crux of healthcare: What can make people change their behavior?

Which brings us back to Mariano Garcia in Camden.

“I wish I could get better and get all this cleared and get me a job and work,” Garcia says.

Garcia’s life is so precarious, his options all risky. If he lands a spot in an inpatient treatment program for his leg, he’s not sure what happens to his one-room apartment.

Jessica Kourkounis

Garcia at home. 

“I don’t want to lose my place because I’ve going to the hospital,” he says. “When I get discharged from the hospital, then I’m where am I going to go out?”

There’s no easy answer, which is what makes wading outside medical care tricky. But hospital staff addressing Garcia’s social needs has helped him keep appointments and – even once or twice – change his own bandages.

Marketplace for Thursday April 3, 2014by Dan GorensteinPodcast Title: What to do when healthcare isn't enoughStory Type: FeatureSyndication: Flipboard BusinessSlackerSoundcloudStitcherBusiness InsiderSwellPMPApp Respond: No

Stop, Thief! When Colleagues Steal From The Office Fridge

NPR News - Wed, 2014-04-02 13:50

Colleagues steal Greek yogurt and half-eaten oranges, and bosses help themselves to their employees' frozen dinner. Yes, fridge theft is apparently rampant in offices all over the world.

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Lagarde: Global recovery hinges on IMF reforms

Marketplace - American Public Media - Wed, 2014-04-02 13:36

Without U.S. support for reforms of institutions like the International Monetary Fund, global recovery from the financial crisis will likely continue at an unacceptably slow place, the head of the IMF says.

In an interview with PBS NewsHour's Judy Woodruff on Wednesday, Christine Lagarde, the managing director of the IMF, discussed the decision by lawmakers to pass an aid package to Ukraine but dropped sections of legislation regarding IMF reforms that would "make a bit more space for China," as Lagarde says. The failed provisions were supported by both the Treasury Department and Lagarde (prompting this op-ed written by Lagarde in the Wall Street Journal in late March), but raised the ire of Republicans and Democrats in Washington, including Speaker of the House John Boehner. 

The IMF will release a revised version of its global economic outlook next week, which is expected to show a slight upward trend in activity, but Lagarde says that even talk of global reforms, such as sanctions on Russia in response to activities in Ukraine and Crimea, points to the continued powerful role of U.S. involvement: 

Delays in implementing IMF-suggested governmental reforms in countries such as Ukraine will result in global economic growth slowing down in kind, she noted. 

“The U.S. was one of the founding partner[s] of the IMF, and it is the leading shareholder of the institution. No matter what is said, the United States will keep its veto right over decisions that are made in this institution. So to make a bit more space for China or for the emerging market economies is only representative of where the world is going.  And we have to be the institution of the future or serve international cooperation with the constant solid leadership of the United States of America. Not exercising that leadership is a mistake.”

Whether U.S. lawmakers agree with Lagarde that supporting IMF-suggested policy is or is not an act of leadership is up for debate. 

Watch the full interview here, courtesy of PBS NewsHour.

Lagarde continues her public speaking tour prior to the IMF's latest outlook on Thursday, April 3 at the Women in the World conference, which you can watch here

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