National / International News

Warring South Sudan Factions Arrive In Ethiopia For Peace Talks

NPR News - Thu, 2014-01-02 09:13

The talks in Ethiopia will focus on a cease-fire, as well as political prisoners and the 2015 presidential elections. But the fighting in the world's newest country continued even as delegates gathered.

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Rail fare rise comes into effect

BBC - Thu, 2014-01-02 09:10
An average 2.8% increase in rail fares comes into effect on Thursday, pushing the cost of some commuter travel to more than £5,000 a year.

Fresh description of New Year rapist

BBC - Thu, 2014-01-02 09:00
Police issue an updated description of a man suspected of raping a woman in Edinburgh during new year celebrations.

Israel ex-PM Sharon 'critically ill'

BBC - Thu, 2014-01-02 08:55
The condition of Israeli ex-PM Ariel Sharon - who has been in a coma since 2006 - is now critical, "with some danger to life", his doctors say.

Michael Schumacher Remains In Coma On Eve Of 45th Birthday

NPR News - Thu, 2014-01-02 08:54

The race car legend fell while skiing in France on Sunday. A blow to his head caused extensive bleeding in his brain. Doctors induced a coma and have operated twice. They aren't talking publicly about his chances for recovery.

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Murder woman moved to be near family

BBC - Thu, 2014-01-02 08:52
A woman who was found murdered while house-sitting had recently moved back to West Sussex from Scotland to be close to her family, they have said.

PM rejects Help to Buy bubble fear

BBC - Thu, 2014-01-02 08:43
Prime Minister David Cameron hails the success of the Help to Buy mortgage guarantee scheme and denies it is inflating the property market.

South Sudan fighting ahead of talks

BBC - Thu, 2014-01-02 08:37
Fighting is continuing in South Sudan, the army tells the BBC, as the warring factions prepare to begin peace talks in Ethiopia.

Weapons find at Palestinian mission

BBC - Thu, 2014-01-02 08:32
Czech police say that they have found weapons at the home of the Palestinian ambassador who was killed by an explosion at his home in Prague on Wednesday.

Weapon used in fatal attack on boxer

BBC - Thu, 2014-01-02 08:30
A weapon was used in a "brutal attack" in which an amateur boxer suffered serious injuries and later died, police say.

Q&A: Rail fare rises

BBC - Thu, 2014-01-02 08:20
Why is the cost of train travel going up?

PM backs 'life means life' sentences

BBC - Thu, 2014-01-02 08:09
David Cameron says "life should mean life", as the government considers US-style sentences totalling hundreds of years for serious offenders.

New Year's resolution: Don't get hacked

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-01-02 08:07

For some tech companies, hopes to not get hacked in 2014 have already been dashed.

Self-destructing messaging app Snapchat is on the defensive this week. 4.6 million user names -- and their associated phone numbers -- were leaked in a security breach. And Microsoft calling service Skype has become the latest victim of the hacking unit calling itself the Syrian Electronic Army. That's after the S.E.A. apparently hacked into Skype's Twitter and Facebook accounts and started broadcasting messages telling people not to use Microsoft because the company sells data to governments. The BBC's Dave Lee joins us to help explain.

Click the audio player above to hear more.

VIDEO: Rail company: Fares are 'good value'

BBC - Thu, 2014-01-02 07:59
A spokesman for Chiltern Railways has defended fare rises, saying he recognises that prices are high, but that they still represent good value for money.

Moved By Emotion: This Story Changed A Photographer's Lens

NPR News - Thu, 2014-01-02 07:56

Kristie McLean traveled to Ethiopia to photograph women with obstetric fistula, a hole formed between the birth canal and bladder or rectum during labor. The terrible injury results in incontinence, and rejection by society. One story affected McLean more than any other; later, she learned its power was in its telling.

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Missing teenager 'died from a fall'

BBC - Thu, 2014-01-02 07:49
A missing teenager whose body was found in central Manchester died from a fall, a post-mortem examination finds.

River bursts banks after heavy rain

BBC - Thu, 2014-01-02 07:44
The River Towy bursts its banks in Carmarthen and high tides threaten further flooding as bad weather continues to cause problems.

After rescue, a question: Who owns Antarctica?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-01-02 07:33

Down in Antarctica, those researchers trapped in the ice are finally on their way home.

The rescue operation was an international one. A Chinese helicopter shuttled stranded researchers from the Russian ship to an Australian icebreaker.

International cooperation is sort of the theme in Antarctica; a place for science, not business. But considering its untapped natural resources, can Antarctica remain unpolluted by economic interests?

For a long time, there’s been speculation about the natural resources buried under Antarctica. It remains only speculation for a good reason.

“At the South Pole, the ice is over 9,000 feet thick. So even getting down to terra firma to find out whether or not there were minerals or resources there would be very difficult,” says Frank Klotz, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Klotz says the U.S. should keep a presence in Antarctica in order to maintain influence over how the continent is governed.

Under an international treaty, Antarctica is kept as an icy lab for scientists.

Ohio State University geologist Berry Lyons is headed to Antarctica next week.

“The international cooperation is probably unique. And a really good model for international cooperation,” says Lyons.

But that international model cuts both ways. For example, the governing body in Antarctica works on consensus.

“Their version of consensus is that everyone unanimously has to agree to a proposal in order for it to move forward,” says Andrea Kavanagh, director of The Pew Charitable Trusts’ Southern Ocean sanctuaries project.

She’s been working to extend protections for the marine life around Antarctica because fishing boats are finding their local waters are all fished-out.

“And that’s why Antarctica has become a great, new, lucrative fishing ground,” says Kavanagh.

The big prize in those waters is Chilean sea bass. Because of its high price per pound, fishermen call it ‘white gold.’

Instead of cooperation, there’s international competition to net the Antarctic fish.

Who owns Antarctica?

Marketplace - American Public Media - Thu, 2014-01-02 07:33

Down in Antarctica, those researchers trapped in the ice are finally on their way home.

The rescue operation was an international one. A Chinese helicopter shuttled stranded researchers from the Russian ship to an Australian icebreaker.

International cooperation is sort of the theme in Antarctica; a place for science, not business. But considering its untapped natural resources, can Antarctica remain unpolluted by economic interests?

For a long time, there’s been speculation about the natural resources buried under Antarctica. It remains only speculation for a good reason.

“At the South Pole, the ice is over 9,000 feet thick. So even getting down to terra firma to find out whether or not there were minerals or resources there would be very difficult,” says Frank Klotz, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Klotz says the U.S. should keep a presence in Antarctica in order to maintain influence over how the continent is governed.

Under an international treaty, Antarctica is kept as an icy lab for scientists.

Ohio State University geologist Berry Lyons is headed to Antarctica next week.

“The international cooperation is probably unique. And a really good model for international cooperation,” says Lyons.

But that international model cuts both ways. For example, the governing body in Antarctica works on consensus.

“Their version of consensus is that everyone unanimously has to agree to a proposal in order for it to move forward,” says Andrea Kavanagh, director of The Pew Charitable Trusts’ Southern Ocean sanctuaries project.

She’s been working to extend protections for the marine life around Antarctica because fishing boats are finding their local waters are all fished-out.

“And that’s why Antarctica has become a great, new, lucrative fishing ground,” says Kavanagh.

The big prize in those waters is Chilean sea bass. Because of its high price per pound, fishermen call it ‘white gold.’

Instead of cooperation, there’s international competition to net the Antarctic fish.

AUDIO: Eye reflections could help solve crime

BBC - Thu, 2014-01-02 07:33
Photographers can now be identified by looking at the reflection in the eyes of people in the photo, according to research.

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