National / International News

Woman's home targeted in hate crime

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-16 02:36
A house in Newtownabbey, County Antrim, is targeted overnight in what is believed to have been a racist attack.

VIDEO: The story of the 1974 World Cup

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-16 02:35
BBC Sport looks back at the story of the 1974 World Cup.

Rose confident for US Open defence

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-16 02:31
British golfer Justin Rose says he is pleased with his form as he prepares to defend his US Open title at Pinehurst.

Algorithm given seat on board

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-16 02:29
A venture capital firm has appointed a computer algorithm to its board of directors, allowing it to vote.

Bosnia and Serbia hit by floods

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-16 02:20
Emergency teams are in action in Bosnia and Serbia after the worst floods in more than a century deluged towns and killed at least three people..

Gas prices seem to be falling (for now)

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-05-16 02:16

After a steady rise since February, gas prices are leveling off, and even dropping in parts of the country. But the relief is only temporary.

Still, it should come as no surprise. Why? Because this is pretty much how gas prices play out every year.

Typically, gas prices typically bottom out in January. By spring, refineries start to go offline for maintenance -- so prices tend to increase.

Gas prices drop again before the summer driving season (where we are right now), only to go back up yet again during the summer.

AAA's Michael Green says the boom in domestic oil production is also playing a factor.

"Prices aren't as volatile than they were in the past," Green says.

Review after scoutmaster sex attacks

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-16 02:11
The Scout Association will fully review the case of former scoutmaster who was jailed for 12 years for 26 sex offences against boys in the 1960s and 1970s.

VIDEO: The story of the 1950 & '54 World Cups

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-16 02:09
BBC Sport looks back at the story of the post-war World Cups of 1950 and 1954.

Nigeria leader cancels Chibok visit

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-16 01:45
Nigeria's president will not now visit the town of Chibok, where more than 200 schoolgirls were abducted a month ago, officials say.

VIDEO: Mr Turner exhibits at Cannes

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-16 01:29
Stars turn out to see director Mike Leigh's Mr Turner, as it premieres at the Cannes Film Festival

GCHQ seeks recruits with competition

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-16 01:21
A new competition backed by GCHQ and the National Crime Agency is looking for members of the public to show off their digital skills.

UK 'could delay independence date'

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-16 01:21
The proposed date of Scottish independence should be delayed if it is not in the best interests of the rest of the UK, a Lords report recommends.

VIDEO: Victim's mum: Free Boko Haram killers

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-16 01:10
A British woman whose son was kidnapped and killed by Boko Haram in Nigeria says she would be happy for her son's murderers to be released, if it helped save the schoolgirls.

Royal Archive documents revealed

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-16 01:08
Windsor Castle offers first glimpse of archive

Blake eyes Yorkshire cricket career

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-16 01:06
Jamaican sprinter Yohan Blake is interested in playing cricket for Yorkshire when he retires from athletics in five years.

Archaeology and business in London's 'Big Dig'

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-05-16 01:00

Europe's biggest construction project is currently underway in London: a new 73-mile long rail link passing underneath the British capital.

Crossrail – as it's called – will bring the city's transport system into the 21st century, increasing its rail capacity by 10 percent and carrying over 200 million passengers every year. But tunneling deep under a historic city like London means burrowing into the past.

"Crossrail is actually the largest archaeological dig that this country has seen in many,many years," observes the project's director Andy Mitchell.

Working alongside Crossrail's tunnel engineers, the company's small, in-house team of archaeologists has – so far – carried out dozens of excavations. Ten thousand items have been discovered from the Stone Age to the Roman period and through to the Victorian Era. The latest find – skeletons of victims of the plague or Black Death that swept through Europe in the 14th century – is causing real excitement in academic circles:

"It's fascinating stuff for us, giving us an insight into what the population was like in those years," says Don Walker of the Museum of London. "The find could shed further light on the biggest catastrophe to hit this city, causing huge social change. The Black Death wiped out perhaps half the population. Everything changed. Labor became scarce. And that's why there are theories that the plague was responsible for ending feudalism."

Crossrail is in the business of building a rail link but like all companies carrying out major construction projects on historically important sites in Britain it is legally obliged to employ the services of professional archaeologists.

"Virtually all of the archaeology in Britain these days is actually done as a response to a commercial development , funded by the developers themselves," says the Museum's Nick Elsdon.

Crossrail is spending $9 million on sifting and preserving the artifacts and human remains that it has come across; that's out of a total construction budget of $25 billion. A small price to pay – it says –for delving into the city's extraordinary past.

"You know this is a historic project," says Crossrail's Andy Mitchell. "We're building the future's history. So I think we engineers have a natural empathy with archaeology , certainly in a town like London."

Most archaeology in Britain is funded by commercial developers. Photo credit: Crossrail

A billion shirts, nothing to wear! It's Silicon Tally

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-05-16 01:00

It's time for Silicon Tally. How well have you kept up with the week in tech news?

This week we're joined by Terry Bush, a Marketplace Tech listener from South Bend, Indiana. var _polldaddy = [] || _polldaddy; _polldaddy.push( { type: "iframe", auto: "1", domain: "marketplaceapm.polldaddy.com/s/", id: "silicon-tally-a-billion-shirts-nothing-to-wear", placeholder: "pd_1400191724" } ); (function(d,c,j){if(!document.getElementById(j)){var pd=d.createElement(c),s;pd.id=j;pd.src=('https:'==document.location.protocol)?'https://polldaddy.com/survey.js':'http://i0.poll.fm/survey.js';s=document.getElementsByTagName(c)[0];s.parentNode.insertBefore(pd,s);}}(document,'script','pd-embed'));

Marketplace heads to London

Marketplace - American Public Media - Fri, 2014-05-16 01:00

From exploring the chasm between the top  1 percent of Americans and those struggling to get by, to the housing bubble (or lack thereof) in Phoenix, Arizona, Marketplace works to find the intersection between the facts on the page and the choices people make as a result. And it’s not news that these issues aren’t inherently "American." Someone on the other side of the globe understands just as well as anyone else the difficulty of trying to feed a family on not enough pay.

Here in the U.S., that manifests itself in the struggle to survive on minimum wage and getting by on food stamps. And certainly we’re not the only ones with CEOs of companies getting paid disproportionately more than the people who work for them.

The question isn’t if our foreign compatriots worry about the same things we do, but how these issues manifest for them and to what degree.

So, we’re headed overseas -- to London, specifically.

All next week, Marketplace Morning Report will be broadcasting from the BBC, taking a closer look at some of these issues in our series Mind the Gap.

We’ll be looking at the increasing disparity between the haves and the have-nots in the U.K. In fact, the numbers are pretty staggering -- the five wealthiest families in the U.K. have more money than the poorest 20 percent. And new data show a 163 percent increase in the number of people who were given emergency food supplies. And with significant numbers of poorer Londoners being priced out of the city and having to relocate to cheaper parts of the country, we’ll examine how folks are feeling about being squeezed out by wealthy foreigners.

From an American perspective, this all sounds awfully familiar.

Plus, we’ll be joined by guests like former board member of the American Chamber of Commerce in Russia, Jamison Firestone, to talk about cooling business ties between London and Russia. We’ll also talk to BBC reporter Rob Broomby about the Scotland Independence Referendum, and what London and Scotland have to gain and lose depending on the outcome.

It’s all part of Marketplace applying what we do best to the perspective of our friends across the Atlantic. So steep a pot of tea, brush up on the lyrics to “God Save the Queen,” and don your favorite football team’s jersey (no, not that football): Marketplace Morning Report is headed to London.

Malaysia Airlines losses worsen

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-16 00:53
Malaysia Airlines losses widen after the disappearance of Flight 370, raising questions about the future of the 76-year-old carrier.

Steve Bruce - the man & the manager

BBC - Fri, 2014-05-16 00:37
Banter, batterings, family and fallouts: Robbie Savage on what makes the Hull boss an inspiration.
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